Top 5 Ways to Store Fresh Fruit without a Fridge

Top 5 Ways to Store Fresh Fruit without a Fridge


Alright, this is John Kohler with OkRaw.com.
Today we have another exciting episode for you, and once again I’m traveling. I travel
a lot. I’m here in Anaheim, California. We’re staying at the Sheraton Anaheim Hotel
this time, and the reason for this episode is to let you guys know how to basically keep
your fruit longer without refrigeration. Like most hotels you stay at might have a dinky
refrigerator nowhere near the size needed for a legitimate raw foodist, you know, that
eats lots of fruits and vegetables. But I want to share with you guys some tips that
I have found so I can store my fruit longer and not have it spoil and go bad as fast,
even without a refrigerator. So with that, let’s go ahead and head inside the hotel
room. So now let’s go ahead and head into the
hotel room and share with your guys all the fruit that I’m eating this trip, and a little
bit more. So this is not quite a normal hotel room, as you guys can see. We got mangoes
in the drawers. We got cases of cactus fruit out. Tangerines, lemons, limes, grapefruits—more
grapefruits. Apples, coconuts, bananas, more cactus fruits, lots of tomatoes. And then
this is not even all of my fruit. So, yeah, this is not how much I eat on a vacation or
on a trip down here at the Natural Products Expo West—be sure to stay tuned for that
video, it’s gonna be a good one—for next three days, and then driving back to Las Vegas,
and literally all the fruit you see here is gonna feed me for the next month. And we got
it at the Los Angeles Wholesale Produce Terminal—be sure to check my past episodes for an episode
on my produce haul and all the stuff I got and for how much it was. This stuff was incredibly
cheap, and that’s why I’m doing this. I can save a lot of money by buying in bulk,
wholesale. But now I want to share with you guys how to store it, because even if you
buy this stuff and it goes bad before you get to eat it, it’s not really serving you.
It’s probably serving my compost pile, but not gonna serve you, so here’s my Top 5
tips on how to store your fruits and some vegetables longer without refrigeration.
Step number one, store it close to the ground as possible. So all these things are on the
ground, some are a little off the ground, but I think we’re on a concrete slab here.
Concrete slab, and then of course the carpet, and that’s gonna stay cooler. Warm air rises.
So by the ground, it’s colder, and with the colder temperature, the fruit is gonna
last longer. It’s not gonna ripen as quicker. Now if you want your bananas to ripen, get
a high, tall shelf and put it up really high, because heat rises so it’ll be warmer up
there. So that’s tip number one. Tip number two—we gotta go over here. Tip
number two, if you got an AC unit in your room or wherever you’re at, crank it all
the way down. Now you might freeze a little bit, this one unfortunately only goes down
to sixty five, and we’re gonna turn on the fan on high so we’re running the air—but
also we’re gonna have the lowest temperature. Temperature’s critical in storing different
fruits and vegetables. Some fruits—many fruits will like it at sixty five degrees
and it’ll preserve it longer, but some fruits it actually still may be too hot. You know,
you shouldn’t put all your fruits, all these in the fridge, because some fruits can be
damaged and actually, let’s go over to one of the cases to show you guys what I mean.
For example, like on this case of coconuts—and actually many different fruits, if you get
the whole case, you’ll actually see if you look closely, you’ll find a temperature
on there. You know, so these young coconuts here from Mexico should be stored at forty
degrees Fahrenheit. And every different fruit or vegetable it better stored best or worst
at certain temperatures. For example, many of you guys have fridges and your fridge’s
usually set at maybe forty degrees plus or minus, approximately, and at that temperature
something like an apple will store amazingly in the fridge. But if you take something like
a tomato, put it in your fridge, it’s far too cold for the tomato. Many people even
think cucumbers will be fine in the fridge, cause that’s what you’re supposed to do
with cucumbers, but the cucumbers could get burned at forty degrees or thirty-six degrees
because it’s too cold. I mean, same with the eggplants over here, right. The eggplants
will get burned, they’ll get a funky, mealy texture and they’re not gonna be optimal
inside the fridge. So optimally, to store something like the cucumbers or the eggplants,
I would want to store it around fifty degrees, you know, that’d be much better.
And if you think about it, that only makes sense. One of the things I always encourage
you guys to do is grow your own gardens, grow your own foods, and leave the foods on the
vine, out in nature growing until you need to harvest it. Like if I had eggplants in
my garden, like I do every summer, I leave them on the plant, and if I want to eat one
I don’t harvest them all and put them in my fridge. That’s lame, man. But that’s
what we have to do because we have grocery stores we buy food at and wholesale produce
terminals. In the garden, you would pick it, come inside and use it as soon as you need
it and it would stay outside and think about it. When do cucumbers and eggplants and things
like tomatoes grow? They don’t grow in the winter. No, no, no. they also don’t like
cold temperatures in your fridge. The tomatoes will be out in the summertime, eighty degree
weather. The cucumbers are out in eighty degree weather. Same with the eggplants. The eggplants
thrive in a hundred degree weather. That’s why we should not store them too cold, they’ll
get burned. So store them in a nice temperature range that they’re gonna like is definitely
the best for them. So as a true raw foodist, you might need a
couple fridges that are in different temperature ranges. So you could have a refrigerator that’s
like thirty-six to four. You could have a refrigerator that’s like fifty to sixty
degrees, and maybe even have a fridge that’s like seventy degrees or so to control the
temperature. And also important, what we’re gonna talk about next, is the humidity. Very
important to control the humidity. I’m not really controlling the humidity in this environment
other than not opening the window. And we have the fan on that’s gonna blow and circulate
some air. You need to have a proper humidity—and once
again I can’t say “Use this humidity, it’s the best!” You always want to dehumidify
your air or you need to add humidity. I don’t like generalizations in life, no matter what
it is. And just like that, some fruits like lower humidity. I know the cactus fruits—they’re
used to growing in the desert in a low humidity climate. They’re gonna store better in a
low humid climate. I’ve had these guys store for up to a month no problem in a low humid
environment. Some crops, such as like oranges, if they’re in high humidity, they’re gonna
rot and spoil and mold and go bad faster. So that’s another very good tip, you may
have to add humidity if you’re in an arid climate, and actually subtract or take away
humidity if you’re somewhere where it’s super humid.
So I already kind of discussed about airflow. Airflow’s super important. We’re in a
hotel so we don’t have fans or anything but we got the air conditioning that’s blowing
some air and kind of circulation some air which is important. And airflow, proper air
flow around the fruits, are very important. So if you have these at home, it might be
good to put a fan on it or even an evaporative cooler, depending on where you live, to get
some airflow because stagnate air can create mold growth and whatnot. Another thing to
do for air circulation besides blowing a fan is getting the fruit out of the boxes. So
take the fruit and getting little trays like this—I like to get these for free at Costco.
And you can just basically put your fruits in a box and basically, instead of having
them stacked like four on top of each other, you want to have them single story. So like
a ranch home, which is one level, verses a skyscraper which can be twenty levels. A lot
of these fruits are packed really deep and they’re not getting as much circulation.
Another thing you’re noticing is I’ve opened up all the fruits. The box tops are
not on the fruits. This is for a very important reason—is because many fruits will off gas,
ethylene gas, and ethylene gas will speed up the ripening process and it’s my job
to slow that down to a snail’s pace so that I can be able to eat all the food before it
goes bad. So another tip to store your fruits longer
is to cull your produce. So what does that mean? That means that today I went through
all of the cactus fruits that we bought over here, that’s why some of them look a bit
empty, and I pulled out all the ones that were bad. They had bruised spots, maybe molding
a little bit, were attracting some fruit flies, were smushy and kind of dripping juice—you
want to pull all those out because literally, rot begets rot. So if I left those in there,
they would just literally infect—the mold will infect the other cactus fruits and then
the whole batch would go bad. You ever heard the terms, you know, one bad apple in the
barrel of apples could cause them to all spoil. So you want to go through and like, if there’s
ones that are bruised like that, that’s not optimal. Hey, pick that out, make it your
next meal, and make sure you have all blemish free fruit in there that you’re gonna be
storing so that they’re store longer instead of shorter.
So while I do have the majority of the fruits actually out of the fridge, I did get…an
almost worthless fridge here in the room, and I want to encourage you guys, if you are
staying at a hotel, you might want to stay at a place that has, you know, they’re called
like suites where they have partial kitchenette with a full-sized fridge and a kitchen you
can actually make food at. I chose not to stay at one of those this time. But the fridges
can be valuable—and I do encourage you guys some fruits are better stored in the fridge
than out, so I took the most valuable produce to me and put it inside the fridge, so let
me show you guys what I got in the fridge. And because I over packed the fridge, the
door will not shut properly…so I had to take some tape here to tape the door shut
otherwise it’s gonna pop open with an explosive force.
So as you guys can see here, what I got inside the fridge, just tons of blueberries that
were like eight dollars a case and organic strawberries. These things are ultra-valuable
and they spoil ultra-fast. And that’s my next topic that I really want to discuss with
you guys. Now, when buying your fresh fruit, it’s always best to buy fruit that has not
previously been refrigerated. Just like I talked about the cucumbers and eggplants and
tomatoes and things like bell peppers—they grow outside in the weather. In eighty degrees,
ninety degree weather in the summertime. That’s when they grow, that’s the temperature they
like. Once you take those fruits and you take them out of their climate into the fridge,
basically—for all practical purposes—they get damaged slightly and now they’ve been
accustomed to the cold and they’re never the same.
Many of you guys may have experienced this with tomatoes. If you get tomatoes from the
garden, they taste really good. Tomatoes from the store don’t taste as good. One of the
reasons, besides them being picked too early, because maybe growing high quality stuff,
is because they’ve been fridged and the flavor changes. Besides the flavor changing
in a refrigerated produce, the storability goes down. So if you’ve never fridged your
tomatoes, they’re gonna last longer than tomatoes that have been picked, fridged, taken
out of the fridge and left out of the fridge. So the berries have been fridged so I’m
putting them back in the fridge and also the berries tend to spoil very quickly in room
temperature. That being said, some product is more resilient
to being stored out of the fridge like I mentioned the cactus fruits and apples and oranges—many
of the fruits I got today—are actually fairly well stored outside the fridge in general.
So one of the things I wanted to share with you guys today really quick, is I got a case
of the green bananas, which are gonna ripen up in about several weeks. I’ll also be
able to eat those. Also got a case of these bananas that are riper now. And this is what
the fridge can do to your fruit—I know many of you guys have bought bananas that are like
this before, and if you’re paying full price for bananas like this, I would caution you
guys against it. Have you guys ever seen the bananas that are kind of like…look gray?
They don’t look nice and vibrant, and yellow, and normally this can happen a lot of times
in the winter. I don’t see it too often in the summertime. But in the wintertime when
they’re colder, basically this is known as fridge-burn. Not freezer burn but fridge
burn for the bananas. What happens when the bananas get too cold like when they’re fridged
because they shouldn’t be stored that cold, basically there’s an enzyme that causes
them to turn this color and then it stops, and stops the ripening process. So they’re
really not gonna be more ripe than they are now. I mean, they’re just not gonna ripen
properly. This is a good thing, like in the case, we
bought this case for drastically discounted price of forty pounds of bananas for six dollars
which I just couldn’t pass up even if they’re not the best tasting bananas because they
are organic. But it also locked in the ripening process and stopped the ripening process so
these won’t go bad as quickly and that is a desirable trait when you have, you know,
forty-four cases of fruit to eat within the next month and over a hundred individual pieces
of fruit sitting in front of you. So I’m glad that this was done. That being said,
this also does affect the flavor and I encourage you not to buy the bananas when they’re
little bit off-color like this. Go to a different store that hopefully will have nice, vibrant,
yellow bananas. So another way I’m sorting my food without
a fridge is with this thing. This is known as a thermoelectric cooler. No it does not
use ice. This has a standard cigarette lighter plug so you can actually travel with it, plug
it in your car, which is quite convenient. And then they actually have a plug in the
wall adapter that you can plug this in in here. So this is not a refrigerator, it only
cools down a certain amount of degrees past the ambient air temperature. And if it’s
not the middle of the summer, these things work great. And in here, you actually can
store some fruit. I got actually an overabundance of the organic blueberries that we’re storing
in here, and actually—besides being a fruitarian like I am and I eat plenty of fruit, I also
encourage you guys to really focus on your vegetables. So this is where I’m storing
all the vegetables. And for the vegetables, I like to store them in the plastic bag so
they retain some of the moisture. In general, the fruit should be removed from any plastic
bags for storage cause then they cannot breathe. And these are just a whole bunch of the different
greens we’re eating this trip. Got some bok choy, some spinach, some lettuce, and
some cabbage leaves. So this is another viable option. I do have a specific video on the
thermoelectric cooler. The cheapest place I’ve found to get that is actually Walmart.
So that’ll be the end of this video for storing your guys’ fruits without a refrigerator
and having it extend their life. It is really easy and some fruits can definitely be stored
longer than you may think, even without a refrigerator. If you think about it, what
did they do a hundred years ago before they had refrigerators, right? Think about that
for a minute. We’re all used to having the refrigerator appliances. Hundred years ago,
they didn’t have them, and still, they had plenty of food and they learned the ways,
the traditional ways to store their food. And there’s a lot more ways that I’ve
researched and learned to store things like vegetables and carrots and all these kind
of things, even without a refrigerator. That being said, I still believe it’s always
best to grow your own and pick it as you need it. So if you want to learn how to grow your
own fruits and vegetables, be sure to check my other YouTube channel as GrowingYourGreens.com.
If you liked like video, please give me a thumbs up. I really enjoy making these nuts
and bolts or how-to videos on how to be a better raw foodist or person that eats more
fruits and vegetables. How to save money buying wholesale and keeping it fresher longer. I
also have another video on Produce Management 101, I’ll put a link down below, where I
go over some storage tips as well. Also, be sure to check my past episodes. I
have over four hundred episodes on this channel, sharing with you guys how to get more fresh
fruits and vegetables and eat a healthy, plant-based diet I your life. And lastly, be sure to subscribe
if you’re not already. I have new videos coming out every week on tips and tricks so
that you can eat a healthier fruit and vegetable based diet.
So once again, this is John Kohler with OkRaw.com. We’ll see you next time and until then remember,
keeping eating your fresh fruits and vegetables. They’re always the best.