The Most Dangerous Fruits In The World

The Most Dangerous Fruits In The World


We all have our ancestors to thank for eating
their way through centuries of foods, in order to find out what’s delicious, and what’s definitely
not. “Don’t. Eat. Metal. DON’T EAT METAL!” And no, not even your produce section is safe. So, which fruit around the world is the most
dangerous? Some of these might even be growing in your
very own backyard. Yellow star fruit According to Authority Nutrition, star fruit
is low in calories, high in fiber, and loaded with vitamin C. But for anyone with weak kidneys,
star fruit also packs high amounts of oxalates. In some cases, eating too much star fruit
can lead to kidney damage and seizures. Folks on prescription meds should also be
cautious — much like grapefruit, star fruit can interact with medications — so check
with your doctor before imbibing, and watch out for those stars. Ackee fruit Jamaica’s national fruit, if not prepared
and eaten properly, can induce what’s been called Jamaican Vomiting Sickness, which can
even lead to coma, and hypoglycemia. Ackee fruit is toxic when unripe. And even when it is ripe, the seeds remain
poisonous. Get your ackee from a person who knows how
to eat it. Elderberries Most of the elderberry plant is actually poisonous,
and contains a cyanide-inducing glycoside in the roots, stems, leaves, and seeds. The berries also contain a small amount of
the poison in their seeds, which is destroyed when the berry is properly harvested and cooked. Then, it can be used in syrups, jams, pies
— even wine. So pick your poison properly prepared. Pangium edule fruit Native to Southeast Asia, the pangium edule
develops a large, brown fruit that is often called a football fruit. Prepared properly in many Indonesian dishes,
the football fruit’s seeds are filled with hydrocyanic acid, which can cause sleepiness
and delirium. But when the seeds aren’t being used for rat
poison, they’re boiled down or fermented to remove the poison, and made into a cooking
oil. Yew berries The yew shrub is a popular plant for landscaping,
due to its ease of care, evergreen nature, and drought-resistance. But tucked into the plant’s little red berries,
is a highly poisonous seed. While some wildlife may be able to consume
the berries by passing the seeds intact in their droppings, humans should never risk
eating this highly toxic berry. Just a few seeds can cause convulsions, rapid
collapse, and fatalities. “Whoa, no way. We are not eating that.” Rhubarb One bite of rhubarb crisp and you’ll forget
all about the plant’s poisonous leaves. And yes it’s a veggie in the scientific sense,
but it’s often prepared like a fruit. The glycosides and oxalates in its leaves
can cause burning of the throat and mouth, stomach pain, kidney troubles, and even coma
if eaten in large quantities. Only the stalk of the plant is edible, lending
a sweet and sour flavor to jams, pies and sauces. Aside from that, there’s not much more to
know about the rhubarb, except, well… “Never rub another man’s rhubarb!” Cashew apples Cashews are technically not a nut. They’re part of the seed of an apple-like
fruit, and grow on the outer end of its host. The cashews that we eat are surrounded by
a toxic hull that must be roasted off before the “raw” cashew can be extracted. The fruit, known as a cashew-apple, is popular
in its native land of Brazil, and is even made into a much-loved juice. Cashew-apples are too delicate for travel,
so are only sold in areas where they’re cultivated, like Brazil, Nigeria, India, and Southeast
Asia. For now, most of us will just have to settle
for simple cashews. “You got any cashews in there?” “No. I picked them out.” “Typical.” Thanks for watching! Click the Mashed icon to subscribe to our
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