SUGAR APPLE Sweetsop Taste Test | Fruity Fruits

SUGAR APPLE Sweetsop Taste Test | Fruity Fruits


[Fluffing a Duck Music] Hello my beautiful lovelies! Hi, it’s Emmy. Welcome back to another Fruity Fruits episode. Today, I’m going to be eating this. And this beautiful, prehistoric-looking fruit is called a sugar-apple, also known as a sweetsop; and its scientific name is a Annona squamosa. Isn’t it amazing? It almost looks kind of like a pinecone or something; kind of similar to a cherimoya, or a custard apple, but a little bit different. So this fruit came to me in a very sweet fashion; it arrived in a box all the way from Florida from lovely Victoria. Victoria, thank you so much for sending this to me! This came actually off her father’s tree. I’ve never had one of these fruits before — I’ve never actually seen one of these before, so I can’t wait to taste some. She picked this on Tuesday; the package arrived on the Thursday; and she said that it’d be ready to eat in a few days. And I read that once it starts to give a little bit, and it starts to split at the stem, it’s about ready to eat. She said also it doesn’t like cold, you have to keep it in a warm spot; you don’t want to put them in the refrigerator, so I’ve just had this sitting on my counter. It has a bit of a green tinge to it, a little bit of pink in between, but nice little lobes like this. In case you’ve missed it, be sure to check out my Fruity Fruits playlist; includes lots of interesting fruits including a lot of tropical fruits. All right, let’s go ahead and give this a taste. So, here’s the stem and…. that’s what’s inside. Isn’t that interesting? So you’re supposed to just pull this apart, and when it’s ripe, it should just give a little bit, kind of like a peach. So, you pull each one of these lobes off. Isn’t this amazing? Look at that! And you’re not supposed to eat the skin, so we’ll peel that off. The interior reminds me a little bit of a mangosteen because it’s you know lobed and white like this. It has a light fruity scent to it. It’s nice. So this fruit is native of the West Indies and tropical Americas, but, it is now grown in parts of Southeast Asia and Asia as well. Very popular in the tropics. We’re not gonna eat the skin portion. And then we can just separate these each in a little lobe; and each lobe has a seed. You can push a little black seed out. Look at that, isn’t that beautiful? It reminds me a little bit of the… dragon’s eyes. So there’s the fruit! Alright, let’s give that a go! Itadakimasu! Mmm! Oh, that’s nice! It’s juicy — kind of reminds me of a grape with a little bit more chew — and the flavor is lovely! A little bit like a melon; a little bit like watermelon, but much sweeter. And it’s not perfumed, as much as say something like a lychee, where it feels very, very or tastes very, very floral. It’s really kind of subtle. It’s delicious. I love the beautiful black seeds, how you eat this kind of slowly. It’s delicious. I’m gonna save the rest of this for my sons because I think they’ll adore it. Victoria, thank you again for sharing your father’s sugar-apples with me. They are delicious! And next time, I’m down in Florida, I’ll be sure to look for them. Well, this time of year at least. I hope you guys enjoyed that one; I hope you guys learned something. Be sure to share this video with your friends and follow me on social media, and I’ll see you in my next video. Toodaloo; take care; byeee! [Fluffing a Duck Music] [Singing] Fruity fruity fruity fruity fruity fruity fruit!