STRANGE Fruits You’ve Never Heard Of!

STRANGE Fruits You’ve Never Heard Of!


from the sacred fruit of Buddhist monks
to the rotting stink of a tropical favorite today we look at strange fruits
you’ve never heard of number fourteen carambola often called a
starfruit for its distinct pointed ridges the carambola is native to
Indonesia the Philippines and other nearby regions used as an ingredients
for a variety of juices preserves and relishes the carambola is entirely
edible it’s yellow tinge to translucent flesh is sour and the small breeds and
sweet in the larger ones but overall they have a tart and subtle taste the
skin of the carambola is thin and waxy taking on different shades of yellow
when ripe another particular feature of this produce is its gelatinous layer of
goo known as Errol that coats and protects about a dozen seeds per fruit
number 13 Perea often found in tropical climates the Perea fruit is also known
as the aptly named bitter melon recognizable by its bumpy wart like
exterior and strange elongated shape the innards of this fruit are spongy and
surround big flattened seeds unlike most other fruit the Perea can be
eaten fresh or ripened with the preferred stage of consumption dependent
on the species the Chinese Korea for example is best
when still mostly green and has a crunchy hydrating texture resemblance of
a cucumber except bitter the flesh in this state remains a plain off-white
other variations however taste best when allowed to ripen fully when the skin of
the fruit turns yellow and peels back revealing sweet and juicy red pulp
beneath in addition to its culinary uses this fruit has been used traditionally
in herbal remedies and medicinal concoctions across the globe number 12
persimmon mostly popular in Asia the persimmon can be found around the world
with varieties also harvested regularly in Mexico the Philippines and American
Midwest the fruit comes from tall trees that reach heights of anywhere between
15 and 60 feet the flesh of the persimmon is dry and pucker inducing
until ripe when it produces its yellow orange or orange brown complexion the
fully developed taste is sweet and high in glucose for this fruit which is
technically albeit surprisingly classified as a berry number 11 Halla
fruit like the result of a pineapple genetically spliced with a pine cone the
hollow fruit is native to and almost exclusively eaten in Australia and the
Pacific Islands it’s sticky Center host a bundle of stocks called keys notable
for their green coarse and bulbous tops and sweet yellow fibers near the point
the pulpy ends of each key from the Halla fruit needs to be chewed on and
broken down but once they are the thick sticky nectar inside resembles a mix of
mango and sugarcane while a tasty treat when eaten raw as a paste or made into a
juice this strange fruit takes on a different phase when left out in the Sun
too long the Halla fruit will begin to ferment
and can currently start to produce an incredibly foul odor a trait that has
earned it the colloquial name of stink not number 10 buddhas had rarely
referred to by its more technical name of the fingered citroen the spindly
strange shaped fruit known commonly as Buddha’s hand has a wide variety of uses
due to its unique shape this fruit has been a staple of not just food goods but
is also utilized in perfume religion medicine and even decor the Buddha’s
hand has a special fragrance making it perfect for adjusting the scent of rooms
and clothing it’s bulky size and odd contour make it a popular choice for
containers and even as an ornamental plant in gardens and on patios across
Asia and living up to its namesake Buddha’s palm is a traditional offering
and New Year’s gift as it symbolizes happiness longevity and good fortune
number 9 rambutan translating to Harry from male Indonesia languages the thinly
spines surface of the rambutan resembles a scarlet Hedgehog or perhaps a burgundy
sea anemone a tropical fruit its leathery outer layer peels back to
reveal a white or pink tinted semi translucent Center the taste of rambutan
is said to be similar to a grape with a somewhat acidic flavor accenting the
sweetness of the fruit at the center of the rambutan is a single seed about the
size of a pistachio nut while they may be intrusive while delving into your new
favorite fruit these seeds have value as their high fat content makes them a
common ingredients in cooking and soap number eight miracle fruit imagine being
invited to a party in which bitter and sour foods like radishes beer pickles
lemons and limes were served after taking a mouth puckering bite the host
hands you a small red berry to try before the next tart tasting
miraculously the pickle suddenly has a sweet flavor instead of its usual acidic
zest these parties actually take place thanks to the miracle fruit surprisingly
containing little sugar this sweet tasting berry contains a special
molecule called miraculin that binds proteins when consumed with sour foods
unlocking your sweet receptors and giving everything a sweet taste for up
to 30 minutes or until you brush your teeth
the miracle fruit continues to be used in Africa to sweeten foods and drink
because it remains banned in the United States with miraculin classified as an
illegal undeclared sweetener number 7 durian
considered the king of fruits across Southeast Asia this large spiny melon
like produce is known as the durian beneath its mace shaped rind the durian
hides oblong yellow chunks of flesh resembling something between a large nut
and an indistinct animal organ while its appearance is certainly strange to
unfamiliar eyes what truly separates this fruit from others is its notorious
stench depending on the individual the smell of durian can evoke a feeling of
ecstasy or one of repulsion as descriptions have ranged from
reminiscent of a sweet perfume to the stinking rod of raw sewage it’s
polarizing odor has caused it to be banned in public places throughout its
native land though its flavour is said to be delicious and alike a blend
between almond and custard or caramel and is a common ingredient in Southeast
Asian dishes number six Lange’s hat originating from the
Malaysian Peninsula the langsat comes in a wide variety and typically grows in
clusters looking like a chandelier made of potatoes but contrasting the dry
dense core of the starchy root the flesh of these fruits is like a marriage
between grape and grapefruit with its sharp sugary taste the major types of
langsat fall into two categories the smaller langsat that grows in larger
bundles and the larger Dooku which only get to the size of a golf ball the Duke
who are valued as supposedly having a less sappy core and sweeter flavor its
hairy outer shell has been used in some countries to treat diarrhea and even a
mosquito repellants when ignited number 5
mangosteen springing forth from the evergreen tree of the same
the purple plum mimicking fruit known as the mangosteen can be found in Asia
India and even tropical regions in Florida and Puerto Rico but unlike its
juicy soft fleshed doppelganger this fruits outer rind hardens into a thick
protective layer guarding its white pulpy innards from pests once picked a
mangosteen does not remain edible for long and its ripeness can be especially
difficult to decipher as its stiff skin makes for a hard indication of
digestibility rarely found in North American markets mangosteen remains a
popular export of Thailand as consumers worldwide have found somewhat unorthodox
uses for the fruit as a medicinal ingredient a component for tanning
leather and other strange applications number four a key traditionally in
African fruit the ickey is a soap berry similar to the lychee and rambutan that
is a staple in a variety of Caribbean recipes today this strange rotund fruit
gives the appearance of an apple crossed with a bell pepper before ripening when
it splits and reveals a unique inner core protruding from its cracked ma are
typically three large black seeds coated in a spongy flesh that keeps the seeds
attached to the fruit this fluffy whitish yellow interior is buttery and
creamy in its texture with a mild tank like a semi-sweet scramble day adopted
by Jamaica as its national fruit the ickey has even been used in the
production of some Jamaican wines but despite its popularity the fruit poses a
danger when consumed unripened and can induce bouts of sickness and vomiting
number 3 Pattaya harvested from cacti native to Central and South America the
Pattaya or dragon fruit as it’s often called is now a favorite in Australia
the Caribbean and Southeast Asia as well grown in varieties ranging from a
strongly sour and juicy texture to mildly sweet and saturated with seeds
different regions prefer different types of Pattaya these low-calorie fruits are
favorites and teas juices sports drinks and even alcoholic beverages so next
time you take a vacation to your favorite tropical getaway be sure to
order yourself a drago tini and give this flaming red fruit a fair shot
number 2 agua hey this pinecone strawberry fusion
known as the agua hey fruit in Peru comes from the
marici a palm tree native to the swamps and tropics of Central and South America
this large tree has been reported to reach as high as 115 feet the fruits
that grow from these trees grow in large hanging clusters and the shiny scales of
the skin protect a sweet yellow Center used in sweets preservatives juices and
white but these aren’t the only food that come from these trees as the sap of
the MER reach a tree has proven to be sweet enough to drink fresh or preserve
into wine and the buds that sprout from its stalks are considered a vegetable in
some cultures even the palm weevils that burrow within the trunks of these
topiary titans are treated as a delicacy number one black sapote a specific type
of persimmon this goopy cocoa colored fruit echoes a thick chocolate pudding
in color texture and taste hidden within the tar-like innards of the black sapote
are typically up to a dozen seeds and it’s thin green yellow skin becomes
edible when ripe but this fruit reminiscent of a hazelnut flavored
papaya is completely inedible when unripe as it tastes a bitter agitating
acidity and have even been used in the Philippines as fish poison