Should Protein Be Part of Your Anti-Cancer Diet? – Dr. Ben Johnson

Should Protein Be Part of Your Anti-Cancer Diet? – Dr. Ben Johnson


Ty Bollinger: What does your diet look like? Dr. Ben Johnson: My diet that I want my patients
eating looks green, very green. Vegetables, lots of
vegetables, all kinds of vegetables in all forms, but key to that is the fresher the
better. So, cutting to you the
less time the better. If you have your own garden, that’s awesome. And then secondly is organic, because you
don’t want those pesticides and chemicals and artificial fertilizers and things working
against you. Ty Bollinger: Okay. Dr. Ben Johnson: So fresh, raw, organic are
the keys, vegetables and then nuts and fruits. And I do allow
my patients to eat small portions of meat. I want it to be organic, free range, or wild
caught, harvested. Ty Bollinger: Okay. So the way that the animals are raised affects
the meat. Dr. Ben Johnson: You know we have all these
studies showing that two eggs a week causes increase in
prostate cancer and red meat causes colon cancer in all of these studies. But you don’t see anybody
comparing organic free range eggs against pen fed, chickens. Ty Bollinger: Right.
Dr. Ben Johnson: You don’t see the free-range meat. Again, so I would love to see those studies done. Of course, no drug company is going to fund those. And no independent farmer has the money to
do that. I don’t
think the meat, the eggs, the things are the problem. I think it’s what we do to them. We put a chicken or a
cow in a pen or a hog. And we feed them genetically modified corn. That’s not their diet. I mean they’re out there eating grass, including
the chickens, and crickets. So they’re out
there eating things that we, when we raise them commercially, that’s not what we’re
feeding them. So now
they have concentrated, genetically modified corn and other chemicals in their body. And then we eat that and
concentrate it in ours. Ty Bollinger: Wow! Dr. Ben Johnson: So I don’t think it’s
the – I’m not a vegetarian. I have no problem with vegetarians as
long as they get adequate amounts of protein, which is sometimes difficult to do unless
they’re educated as to how to get those. And there are certain amino acids you just
don’t find in vegetables at all. But we have nice
supplements these days. So you go to a supplement store and get those. So I don’t have a problem with a patient
being a vegetarian. But I certainly don’t have a problem with
them being, omnivarian because, we need protein, especially our immune systems need protein. I just want it to be healthy protein.