Nutrition Made Easy: 3 Principals to Healthy Eating

Nutrition Made Easy: 3 Principals to Healthy Eating


RAMON SODANO: Well,
hello everyone. Welcome to Nutrition Made
Easy, Three Principles to Healthy Eating. My name is Ramon Sodano. And I am the coordinator
for fitness services and education over at Washington
State University’s Student Recreation Center. So what that means is I oversee
the personal training, strength conditioning, weight room, and
well-being online departments. Another job that I have
here at the university is I’m an adjunct
faculty member. So I teach a couple classes
in the kinesiology department, one of which is
nutrition related to fitness and
sport, which is kind of one of my specialties,
which is why you have me talking about nutrition. However, in today’s
lecture we’re not going to be talking about
it related to fitness and sport. We’re going to be talking about
just kind of general, not even requirements. Just general guidelines to
help lead you to healthy eating to make these things simple. The whole point of
this entire lecture is for you to understand
simple tips and tricks that you can utilize to make
eating very simple for you. I know out there there are
all these crazy fad diets. There is how to lose this many
pounds in X amount of time. And you have the ketogenic diet. You have intermittent fasting. You have the zone diet. You have the warrior diet. You have all these
different things out there. And it can just be very
overwhelming at times. And while those things
definitely have some evidence to them, they have some
good information to them, and they do work,
it’s not like you have to dive into
one of these things to make sure that you
are developing the best, most optimal, healthy you. So why we are here today is
to kind of give you really what are the basics of
a lot of those diets, and just the simple rules
to follow that will make you a healthier individual. So with that, we’ll kind of
get started in today’s lecture. And yeah. I hope you all enjoy. So it’s always good to give
the topic of what we’re going to talk about today. So the first thing we’re
going to talk about– and it’s really going to be
the backbone to everything that we talk about it–
is this concept of JERF. We’ll discuss eating from
the rainbow, tips and tricks for shopping, what
nutrient density is, and why that’s important to you
and just the typical consumer, marketing schemes,
and this kind of idea I have called live life. So first and
foremost, that kind of brings me to this
concept that’s not new. Right? Hippocrates, way back
in the day, in 400 BC, had the famous quote
that I’m sure many of you heard that says, “Let food be
thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” So this is just
essentially saying, what you put in
your body is going to dictate how your body works. So in Western culture,
we are in this sense of we are not thinking
about preventative care. We wait for things to
happen, and then we try to deal with the
symptoms instead of dealing with their root causes. So we want the pill
to fix anxiety. We want the pill
to fix depression. All these things
start to develop, and we’re going to start
hammering out and trying to fix these symptoms, which
actually the root cause may be coming from just an
unhealthy lifestyle. And that unhealthy lifestyle,
one of the pillars of it, may be improper nutrition
or unhealthy nutrition. Other pillars we’ll
consider, physical activity. And another big one is sleep. Of course, there’s
other pillars as well. But those are the
three big ones. But it’s just always funny to
me that back in ancient times that we already knew that
what we put in our body was going to dictate our health. And I’m just trying
to get back to that. I’m trying to make
it simple again, understand that food can
be a medicine for you. And it’s not even a medicine
to fix the problems. It’s a medicine to not let
the problems ever develop. So if we can kind of
get back to that root, and understand that
proper nutrition, a proper healthy
lifestyle is going to help us negate these
different kind of ailments that develop from us. So I just kind of always
like breaking that up. So moving on to our first
concept of our first principles that we’re going to
talk about for the three principles for making nutrition
easy is this concept of JERF. JERF stands for
Just Eat Real Food. And this is something
that me and a good friend of mine, John Camp– I have to give him a shout out. I don’t know if we really
came up with this acronym. I highly doubt we did. But I think we are the ones
that are taking it mainstream. I have my students all over the
university talking about it. We’ve given other lectures
and webinars at other places. And I mean, we want
to make JERF t-shirts. You know? This is a lifestyle
that we like to live. And it just comes
to the standpoint of putting real food
inside your body. So staying away from this
unnatural stuff that’s highly processed, has
shelf lives of 250 years, and all this kind
of nonsense that’s out there that is not really
what your body was meant to break down, digest,
and put into utilization of energy production. A lot of these quote, unquote,
fake foods or unnatural foods that we have are so relatively
new to the human digestive system that it can kind of send
our system into an alarm, which has all kinds of different
detrimental effects, and stuff like that as well. So we’re going to kind
of go through some of the process of where
we came up with this idea of just eat real food to give
you a little bit of evidence of why we believe that it is
going to make a healthier you, and help lead to a healthier
individual all the way around. So how we came up
with this concept, or not really us again– but
where we really relate it to is this concept of a lot
of people will always think about a healthy
diet is low in fat, or a healthy diet is
low in carbohydrates. Or a healthy diet is
moderate in protein. So they’re thinking
about these distribution of macro nutrients. Your macro nutrients
are your energy producing nutrients, which is
your protein, carbohydrates, and fats. OK. So all these different diets. For instance, the
ketogenic diet out there, it’s pretty much a
zero carb, high fat, moderate protein diet. And while it does have lots
of great benefits to it and stuff, a lot of
people in that field– not even in the
field, but the people who are consumers of
the ketogenic diet, start to demonize carbohydrates. And, again, excessive
carbohydrates is bad. But so is excessive fat. And so is excessive protein. Right? So anything in
excess is really bad. But what we started to
come to the realization, and when we did a lot of the
research on different macro nutrient protocols, what
we saw was that there’s different civilizations around
the world who have drastically different macro
nutrient profiles, yet they don’t have
to deal with all the crazy metabolic disorders
and other ailments and diseases that us in the Western
culture deal with. So a lot of these
different civilizations will have a dominantly
carbohydrate diet that we see in a lot of
Eastern Asian cultures. And a lot of these
different civilizations, like we’ll see in
the Inuit tribes have a dominantly high fat diet. And a lot of other of
these civilizations, in some African
hunting cultures, or even Aboriginals
in Australia, they have a dominant meat
diet, or a protein diet. And all these individuals,
with their wide array of different macro
nutrient profiles, are not getting nearly
as sick as we are. And the root cause of
that is really twofold. One would be that they
are getting their food sources from real food. They’re getting
their carbohydrates from real sources
of carbohydrates. They’re not getting what I
call cardboard carbohydrates, your wheat thins, your wafers,
all that deliciousness. Right? That’s not real food. They’re actually getting
their carbohydrate sources from the field, putting
them into their meals, and eating them like that. Additionally, they’re also
not extremely sedentary. They are physically active. And they are doing something. They are not sitting in a
desk or a chair all day, not moving their bodies. What seems to happen with
us in Western cultures especially is that we
have developed technology so far that we are able to
sit within a keyboard’s reach and have everything
delivered to us. OK. Even if you are eating
nothing but real food, but you’re eating
an amount in excess of your total daily
energy expenditure, and you’re not having
any physical activity, that can lead to some
metabolic disorders as well. It just seems that we are
so pampered and spoiled now, and we’ve come such a
long way with everything at our fingertips
is actually going to make some serious detrimental
causes to our health. I think I explained
it one time before. I feel like where
we’re going is, if anyone has seen
the movie Wall-E, they have these individuals who
are living on spaceships who just sit in these motorized
floating cars that take them everywhere. They’re drinking 44
ounce big gulp sodas. And they’re just morbidly obese. And they don’t do
anything, because they have this technology that is
doing everything for them. If we want to
utilize our bodies, this is not what we want. And we’ll talk about discipline
here in a little bit. We need to learn how
to balance this widely technological advanced
world with our primal bodies that we have. Because if we don’t utilize
our bodies in the way that it was constructed
over millennia of years, and also the food
that was utilized in it over those many years,
it’s going to deteriorate. It’s going to falter. And it’s not going
to be healthy. And it’s going to lead
to a lot of problems. So, again, this JERF concept
really came from the idea that these different cultures,
different civilizations had wildly different
macro nutrient profiles, but still never
saw, or don’t see the same metabolic syndromes,
and diseases and ailments that we do in Western cultures. And I kind of touched on
this next slide a little bit already. But this is
something that I like to bring up for the
evolution of human nutrition. My slide’s looking a
little weird right now. I apologize for that. But that’s OK. So what I’m trying
to really illustrate with this slide
is, if we’re going to be super intense about how
long our digestive system has been developing over time,
we see that our first fully upright bipedal hominid,
the Australopithecus came around about 4
million years ago. So this is our earliest
known ancestor. OK. So this, if you want to stretch
it as far as we possibly can, again, there’s other
types of creatures that we evolved from
even further back, but this is our
earliest known ancestor. If we want to start dictating
that our digestive system started to develop, we
could go back as far as 4 million years ago. However, if you want to be a
little bit more conservative, when the Australopithecus
line diverges into some lines, of which
eventually will rise to homo sapiens, i.e.
us, we’re looking around 3 million years ago. OK. And if we want to be when
first true humans came out, let’s play it at the
most conservative, 1 and 1/2 million years ago. Or I guess 1.8
million years ago, since I guess we’re at 2020. Right? We’re at 2018. Well, I’ll jumping ahead. I’ve been doing
interviews with students who’ve been telling me their
graduation dates for college, which is 2020 and 2021, which
is why that’s in my head. Anyway, super beside the point. But if we talk about
our earliest true human, the homo habilis, came around
at 1 and 1/2 million years ago, and that’s being
conservative, that’s saying that our digestive
system has started to evolve 1 and 1/2 million years ago. And that was based off of what
was available to us really. We were a feast,
famine kind of species. Right? We didn’t have readily
available food. We did not have
widespread farming. We definitely didn’t
have Uber Eats. So we didn’t have that
stuff being delivered to us. Right? We were constantly
on the look for food, hunting and gathering, and
getting it, and maintaining real food in our diet. We can go all the
way down this line, and the next stop I like to take
is the agricultural revolution, so when farming really
became prevalent amongst human civilization,
which is about 10,000 BC, so about 12,000 years ago. So this is when a
lot of people will talk and be like, well,
widespread farming started 12,000 years ago. So we’ve had 12,000 years
to be able to adjust our digestive systems. Well, they may be
somewhat right here. The farming back then was
much different than what the farming is right now. They didn’t have the mega
farms with pigs stacked on top of each other, and
living in their own filth with each other, all
that kind of stuff. We didn’t have pesticides being
sprayed on massive landscapes and all those kinds of things. So I would say what
was being farmed at that time was much different
than what’s going on right now. And with that,
they were obviously doing their own farming. It wasn’t like you had
Jim who is the farmer of this entire civilization. Everybody had their
own stuff going on at their own little house. And they were having to
do all the physical labor to be able to obtain all of that
farm food, farm game, and stuff like that. So what we’re really seeing
is with the Industrial Revolution– and if we’re
going to be generous, we’re going to say
it started in 1760. But really what the
Industrial Revolution and the technological
revolution, this is going to start in 1840. And this is when we’re seeing
manufacturing automation enabled mass production and
distribution of novel foods and ingredients reflected in
the increase of consumption of bread, cereal grains,
refined sugars, such as table and fructose, vegetable
oils, so on and so forth. So we’re giving ourselves
200 years or so of time to develop to this newly
widely available food. And then, honestly,
if we’re going to be super honest
about everything, it’s not til the
19 and 1960s when this really widespread
crazy distribution of food, with all the high
fructose corn syrup, all these preservatives to
give really super long shelf time, your super sizes, all this
different stuff came abundant. So I honestly really think
that this new style of food that we’re putting in our
body, it’s only been going on for the last 50 to 60 years. And if you look at, we’re
developing our digestive system for 4 million years, and now
we’ve had an abrupt halt, not only in our physical
activity, but also in the food that we’re putting
in our body, we are going to not be able
to handle what’s happening. These trans fats,
these different things that are completely not
known to the human digestive system are going to send
your system on alarm, cause a bunch of
chronic inflammation, which has been shown time
and time again in research. It leads to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes wasn’t a
thing until refined sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and
all these added sugar in foods really came about. And it was super small
amongst our civilization. It was only in adults. And that’s why it was
called onset diabetes. But now you’re seeing it over
and over again in children, because they’re just eating
so much sugar non-stop, causing so many insulin
spikes that your body’s not able to utilize the sugar and
just builds up in the blood, developing these
hyperglycemic reactions and leading to type 2 diabetes. These things are new
to the human body. These things aren’t
meant to happen. It’s not what the human body
is supposed to go through. So it shows that something
is drastically wrong. It’s not wrong in
our food supply. Obviously we need to feed
a mass amount of people. We didn’t have 3.7 billion
or however many people that we have right
now back then. So, of course, we
need to figure out ways to have mass
production of food health. But we also need
to learn that we don’t need to over
consume to the state that we are right now. And also, just the lack
of physical activity, because most of
us have desk jobs. Let’s put it this way. I always explain it like this. The human creature
is meant to try to be as efficient as
possible, because we are used to living in a
feast, famine kind of time. So that’s why we
hold fat in our body. We have from around anywhere
from 50,000 to 70,000 extra calories on our
body to be able to survive in times of famine. Even if you are sitting at a
super low body fat percentage, we need to hold
on to that stuff, because the human
body was smart. And it knew that
it was going to go in times of famine,
times of stress where it needed that
excess energy on it. Just in the last 50 to 60
years, or let’s be generous. In the last 200 years,
that’s not so much prevalent. Right? We no longer live to survive. We live to enjoy. So we need to
figure out a balance to be able to handle all this
stuff that’s ready for us at our fingertips. Right? I don’t even have to go to
the post office to get stamps. I can go to stamps.com
to get my stamps. Right? I mean, there’s tons. Like Uber Eats is out there. I don’t even need to go to
the store to get my food. I can sit in my couch, have
the Cheetos fall on my belly button, find [INAUDIBLE]
movie stub tickets in between my belly
crease and my groin. I’m obviously
exaggerating right now. But it’s just, we’re
turning into sloths. And it’s because
in our nature is we want to conserve as
much energy as possible. It’s just in our human
nature because we never knew when we needed
to expend that energy. But now there is not that time
when we expend that energy. So we need to figure out
some sort of self discipline in our nutritional habits
and in our physical activity to make everything
come full circle and get back to what the
human body is supposed to be, and how it’s supposed to work. We’ll touch on this stuff
again a little bit later in some different slides. But just for some
fun, we have evolution of AI, which maybe more
important for a different day when the androids take
over, and cell phones are then implanted in our mind. #BlackMirror. OK. So now kind of coming
back to the JERF concept. OK. So if we’re trying to
JERF, one of our principles is to just eat real food. It sounds easy to do. Right? So it actually is
pretty easy to do. But these are some ways
to identify real foods from unnatural foods. OK. So let us turn up
the heat right now, and get down on our real
foods and our unnatural foods. OK. So you can see on the left,
we have our real foods. On our right we have
our unnatural foods. And for some reason,
there’s very limited bullets on our real foods. Maybe cause there’s less
things in real food. So first and foremost,
eating real food, that food comes from the Earth. Does it grow from the ground? I always say it this way. Like I saw my buddy had
organic potato chips. I’m like, oh yeah, they
came off the tree like that? Right? It’s those kinds of things. Right. Just because it says
organic, doesn’t mean that’s how it’s
going to come in nature. Does it come from
the Earth like that? OK. We have animal products. Right. There’s our meats. There are natural
sources of food. Granted, there’s things that
happen within factory farming, all those kinds of
things that’s going to be detrimental to the meat. But still, animal products
are going to be real foods. Then when you’re
looking at the labels, they have minimal
to no ingredients. They don’t have all
this crazy stuff that you can’t pronounce
on the ingredient list. It’s going to say
lettuce and water. OK. It’s not going to
say a bunch of stuff. When we’re looking at
our unnatural foods, these things are loaded
with multiple ingredients. They have food
additives in them. They have food coloring, added
sugars, hydrogenated fats. This trans fat concept is crazy. So hydrogenated
or trans fat was– I can’t remember if it was
in the ’50s or the ’60s when it was developed– but
what a hydrogenated fat is is the ability to either
remove or add a hydrogen ion. I can’t remember what you do. But you do something with
the hydrogen in a fat. And it allows fats
that are usually liquid at room temperature to
be solid at room temperature. So this kind of
fat has never been introduced into the
human digestive system until maybe 60, 70 years ago. And this is one of the main root
causes of chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis,
cardiovascular diseases, and all these kinds of things. Trans fat is actually
being banned from foods and it’s been taking
out of all foods. They have a certain
amount of time. I believe I heard
this like a year ago. And they had like
a three year period to be able to get trans
fat out of different foods on the shelf. So there is so much bad that
comes from hydrogenated bad that they’re actually going
to be removing it from food. So always be wary
of hydrogenated fat. I’ll be honest, don’t worry
about saturated fat too much. I understand that
general recommendations is going to tell you
that you should only have 10% of your diet
coming from saturated fats. However, if you’re eating a diet
that’s coming from real foods, and you’re getting a good
distribution of macro nutrients, and you’re getting
good sources of saturated fats, you’re most likely
going to be OK. Additionally, when we’re
looking at unnatural foods, these things have the
extended shelf life. I’m sure many of you have heard
about how a Twinkie can survive a nuclear blast. It’s always the example I use. And that’s cause
that thing has so many different preservatives,
different types of chemical structures, and it’s
the high fructose corn syrup, the trans
fat in there that allows that to last for
a long period of time. Well, it is good to have
extended shelf life, because it gives food
long periods of time to sit on the
shelves, be purchased, and they don’t go bad so fast. We don’t have as
much food waste. Putting those
things in your body isn’t super conducive
to your health. So it has a little bit
of a give and take. This is where that
discipline comes in. So I’m going to kind of move
on to some tips for JERFing, which kind of takes these
concepts to another level. And one of them is
this KISS principle. And this is Keep
It Simple Stupid. Right? So choose foods with the
least number of ingredients. We talked about how
real foods have little to no ingredients in them. When choosing foods, try to
find ones that have the least number of ingredients. We want to avoid
sauces, ketchup, barbecue sauce, and soy sauce. All these things have excessive
amounts of added sugar in them that is going to take your
carbohydrate and sugar totals well over the roof. That’s going to lead to
excess caloric intake that will lead to all kinds
of obesity, metabolic, and cardiovascular issues. There are sauces out there
that are going to be OK. Obviously if you can
make your own ketchup from your own tomatoes
and stuff, that’s fine. Again, anything
in excess is going to have some detrimental causes. You have your hot sauces that
are coming more from peppers and things like that. They’re going to have
zero calories in them. They’ll be all right. But for the most part,
those delicious sauces that we love to drench our foods
in, especially barbecue sauces, maple syrup– maple syrup, by the
way, has like 45 grams of sugar per two tablespoons. It’s ridiculous. So just be careful
with those things. Again, I’m not going to tell you
to give these things completely up. But learn how to use them
with some sort of discipline. Shop at your local
farmer’s market. We are super lucky
out here in Pullman. In Moscow, our neighboring
town over across the border in Idaho, has an
awesome farmer’s market. You get to meet your local
farmers at the farmer’s market. So you’re going
to be able to know where your food’s coming from. Most of the time, they’ll
be able to let you go there and see how, if you’re
going to get meat from them, you see how their
cattle’s raised. If you want to, you can
see how it’s slaughtered. You can see how
everything’s done so you make sure you’re
getting quality food sources, and hopefully that the animal’s
being treated in a humane way as well. We want to make sure to
eat superfoods, things like broccolis, almonds, kale,
chia seeds, spinach, eggs, lentils, et cetera. And you can go online and
take a list of superfoods. There’s tons out there. When looking at an ingredient
or nutrition labels, let’s avoid numbers. Avoid food dye number
two and things like that. I promise you, food dye
number two is not a real food. It’s not coming in
nature like that. A huge important one,
especially to you men out there, domesticate yourself. Learn how to cook. You need to know what’s
going in your body. I know you can go
to a restaurant and get a good meal that
you think is healthy. But you have no idea
all the different things that are being put in there. Right? It may have this delicious
taste due to a certain cream sauce that was put in there that
has excess amounts of calories put into it, with
high amounts of sugar, and high amounts of fat, and
are all that in there as well. And just when you
cook your own food, it brings you into a
connection with your food that’s also important
to understand. Grow your own or hunt. Right? Grow your own vegetables. Get your own fruit trees. If you can provide yourself with
your own vegetables, fruits, and things like that,
you know how it’s grown. You know what’s going with it. Same with hunting. You’re going to get
a lot better quality protein from a wild animal. And then there’s the whole
benefits of the hunt, coming into tune with nature. You have a lot more
respect for that animal once you are hunting it. I understand the
vegans and stuff out there are going to
disagree with me. But there is something. It’s not romantic. It’s a relationship that
you build with this animal that you have a connection with. And it makes you appreciate
the meat much, much more. Eat everything. Bulk up. Get veggies during
their seasons. Don’t discriminate. Eat all the foods on your plate. Try to join a co-op. Co-ops are great. Support your local farmers
and your local businesses. For the most part, they’re
going to have good quality foods there. And don’t feed the trash bin. Utilize. That kind of goes into
don’t discriminate as well. Right? Utilize every vegetable
that you have. Use carrot nubs for soups,
broccoli stocks for pesto, all that kind of stuff. Learn how to use everything. So JERFing is our
first principle. And our other two
principles are going to be a product of JERFing. So, again, just eat real food. Get back to what is naturally
meant to go in your body, and that your body
knows how to digest. Now, our principle
number two is going to be what I call
eating from the rainbow. So this means you’re going
to eat fruits, vegetables, and meats of all
different colors. So the reasoning behind
this is the reason that foods have
different colors in them is cause it dictates their
different micronutrient and phytochemical profiles that
give the food a certain color. So foods that are
usually colors of red have vitamins A and C in them. Foods that are more
purple have vitamin C and K. Orange has
got C and A in there. All these different things
have different colors that have different
micronutrients and phytochemicals in them. And micronutrients
and phytochemicals are essential to how your
body runs its daily functions. So we’ll talk about
micronutrients here in a second. But micronutrients are different
than your macro nutrients. So macro nutrients are your
protein, carbohydrates, and fats. Right? Those are the ones
that give you energy. They have calories in them. OK. Micronutrients
and phytochemicals do not have any
calories in them. And they are needed
in smaller amounts. That’s like your B vitamins,
all that kind of stuff. But what they are
used for is they allow for the
enzymatic reactions to take place in your
body that utilize macro nutrients for metabolism
and energy production, for one. There’s tons of other
things that they do. Right? Calcium is always
known to help in bone health and other things. Iron’s going to help
deliver oxygen, increase the oxygen delivery in
your red blood cells, and things like that. So it’s not just for enzymatic
functions of metabolism and energy production. That’s predominantly your
B vitamins right there. But all these micronutrients
and phytochemicals allow your body to
do the processes that it needs to do to survive
and to optimize at a higher efficiency. So you need these
things in there. And you need them in a variety. OK. That’s why eating
from the rainbow is good, because it allows you
to have that variety of all these different micronutrients
and phytochemicals without even thinking about it. You don’t need to get a bunch
of different supplements to do this. And, in fact, a lot of people
are taking excess amounts of certain vitamins. The RDAs kind of show that
there is no extra increase on performance or
optimization of human health when you go above certain
recommended daily allowances. And sometimes that
can be detrimental. Right? Your fat soluble vitamins,
if you take an excess amount, can actually be very
detrimental to your health. Granted, some vitamins
in a little bit of excess can show some, not
so much performance enhancing effect for
athletes, but some health benefits as well. But what can happen is if
you’re focusing so much of taking one vitamin there are
these things called bivalence, or bivalent vitamins,
and bivalent minerals, which they have
competing interests. They’re both utilizing things. And if you have too
much of one, it’s not going to allow the
other to do its thing. So you want to make sure to
have a good balance of all these things. And eating from the rainbow is
just a simple way to do this. So, again, your fruits,
vegetables, and your meats of all different colors. Get them in there. It doesn’t have
to be in one day, but throughout your
weekly cycle of eating. So when we’re moving on
to principle number three, this is kind of a simple
trick to actually have. This is shopping from the
perimeter of the store. So typically your fresh
fruits and all this stuff is going to be on the perimeter. More in the aisles are you going
to have those extended shelf life, cakes, cookies, pastas,
all that kind of stuff in there. And on the outside
borders, you’re going to have your fresh foods,
your meat, poultry, dairy, cheese. Again, you’ll have your bakery. You’re going to have some
bread and stuff there. I’m not the biggest
proponent of bread. If you can eat it in
moderation, you’re fine. But bread, again, does it come
out of the ground like that? No. But it comes as wheat, and
all this stuff, and grains, and we’ll break it down. So I’m not saying get off bread. But if it’s not
huge in your life, it’s probably one of the
better things to get rid of. I saw lots of benefits when
I stopped eating bread. Again, I don’t completely
take it out of my life. But I minimize it drastically. And also what is probably
going to be on the outside is going to be the booze aisle. Again, everything in
moderation, my friends. But, again, don’t
live up your life. But this trick of shopping from
the perimeter of the store, it makes things so simple. It keeps you out of
those dangerous aisles. I promise you, 99.9% of those
cereals that are marketed as healthy for you are dog crap. OK. Stay away from that stuff. Try to stick to the
perimeter of the stores, all that good stuff. So those are our
three principles. We have Just Eat Real
Food, eat from the rainbow, and then shop the
perimeter of the store. But now I want to kind of
dive into some other concepts that are important
that are essentially components of these principles. And we briefly talked about
nutrient density earlier. This is going to be dealing
with our micronutrients within our foods. OK. So nutrient density
identifies the proportion of nutrients in foods. So nutrients are components of
foods that an organism needs to survive and grow. Right. We talked about the
utilization of micronutrients within our foods, help with
the enzymatic functions, or our metabolism,
energy production. So those things are needed to
break down our macro nutrients and be able to help facilitate
those actions to take place, to allow our bodily functions to
work at the highest capability. It’s extremely important to
have these things in there. So when we’re talking
about nutrient density, we’re looking at foods that
aren’t calorically dense. Like they have lots
of calories in them. But they have more
micronutrients in them. So nutrient dense foods have a
good ratio of macro nutrients to micronutrients. Honestly, more
nutrient than calories. Energy dense foods
have higher levels of calories with less
nutrients, i.e. what we call empty calories. So things that aren’t utilized
for proper bodily functions. An example of this is you can
see 100 calories from a couple Oreos. I think it’s two Oreos
is 100 calories, compared to 100 calories of spinach. Right? You’ll see the amount
of spinach that you get is a huge amount
compared to those two Oreos. And you’re getting a host
of micronutrients in there. So you’re not having to deal
with those empty calories. So utilizing foods that
are more nutrient dense is extremely important for your
overall function as a human being. With that– well,
not even with this, but there is this concept
that drives me crazy. And it’s, so I can eat
whatever I want as long as it fits my macros. So lots of individuals
will be like, OK, I know my total daily
energy expenditure. So my total daily
energy expenditure is the amount of calories
that I expend each day. And if I eat at that number,
I will not lose weight. Nor will I gain weight. So say my total daily energy
expenditure is 3,000 calories. So if I ate 3,000 calories,
I wouldn’t lose weight and I wouldn’t gain weight. All right. So then people would do
what’s called macro nutrient profiling. So they’re going to do
a diet that is 40% fat, 30% carbohydrates, 30% protein. All right. That’s actually super outside
of general recommendation. So we can go more like
55% carbohydrates. We’ll go 15% protein. And the rest coming from fat. That fits more of the
general guidelines, which we don’t need to go down
that rabbit hole right now. But then they think, OK,
well, I have 3,000 calories. I have my 55% coming
from carbohydrates, which is whatever, somewhere
around 1,700 calories. So I could distill
those carbohydrates with a bunch of simple pasta,
Oreos, chips, crackers, and I’m fine, because
it fits my macros, and I’m not going over my
total daily energy expenditure. That’s very inaccurate thinking. And that’s due to
the fact that you’re eating a bunch of empty
calories with that idea, and you’re not getting
those micronutrients. And then that’s going to
be able to help facilitate those actions that your
body needs to put into place for you to optimize
and work properly. Right? So if you’re just eating,
even though you’re eating at your total
daily energy expenditure, and you’re eating within
the macro nutrient profiles, you’re still not creating
the most healthy you. And in all honesty,
you most likely will lose lean body
mass and gain body fat. You may maintain your
weight, but you’re going to lose a lot of
the beneficial things that can be on your body,
such as skeletal muscle and those kinds of things. And additionally, on
the inside of your body, just cause you’re not losing
weight, or gaining weight, and all that, you
have no idea what’s going on in your
arteries, what’s going on with your heart,
what’s going on with all those different things,
what’s happening to your liver due to this. What’s going on due to
the food that you’re putting into your body? So this idea of if it fits my
macros, I’m good, is faulty. OK. Where we are able to kind
of utilize this philosophy is with your high intense
athletes, your bodybuilders, your individuals who already
have a lot of lean muscle mass on their body. And they need to be able to
eat a large amount of calories to maintain the amount
of muscle on their body. Ronnie Coleman’s
a great example. He’s an old bodybuilder
who was gigantic, 300 pounds of solid muscle. He needs to eat anywhere from
like 7,000 to 8,000 calories a day to maintain his
muscle for his body. So he can eat a
bunch of junk food from that to
sustain what he has. However, that individual has
had like three back surgeries, and a bunch of hip surgeries,
and can barely move now. So he put his body
through stuff that wasn’t meant for the human body to do. So, again, it’s a
give and a take. If you have a sport that you
have to abide by, of course, you’re going to have to
do what you need to do to sustain your core totals. But I promise you. Getting better quality food,
nutrient dense food in there is going to make
you feel better. It’s going to make
you live longer. And it’s going to
be able to make you play with your great,
great grandchildren someday, which I know
a lot of us want to do. And if you want to
be a great athlete, honestly, being able to provide
yourself with the best way to increase those enzymatic
functions of the breakdown of those macro
nutrients in your body to be utilized as energy
during whatever performance that you have, getting quality
nutrient dense foods in there is going to help with that. So moving on from if
it fits your macros, well, we’re going to
stay kind of in this idea of nutrient density. I just wanted to
kind of give examples of different types of nutrient
dense foods and energy dense foods. So our nutrient dense foods. We have fresh fruits,
vegetables, berries, melons, mangoes, papayas, dark
green vegetables absolutely. Sweet potatoes, tomatoes. We’re seeing that
these are real foods. Right? They’re the just eat real foods. Now we’re going to go
over to this nonsense. So it’s many processed foods. We have cakes, snacks, donuts. I love donuts too. I get it. Candy. Most sauces. Pasta sauces are terrible. OK. Low fat and fat free products. What happens when you’re
doing these low fat and fat free products,
all they’re doing is jacking up the sugar
content that’s in there. So it’s a marketing scheme. I promise, if you look at fat
free milk compared to 2% milk, and you look at the carbohydrate
sugar content in there, the carbohydrate
and sugar content is going to be double to
triple what’s in the 2% milk. Don’t be scared of fat. Fat’s not bad for you. It’s an essential macro nutrient
that you need in your body. The only fat you should
be scared of is trans fat. Also breakfast cereals. They’re super dense in
carbohydrates and simple sugars. Breads and microwavable meals. Even this Lean Cuisine. Just cause it says lean does
not mean it’s good for you. And we’re going to talk
about marketing schemes here in a second. But there’s all these
crazy marketing schemes out there to make you
think things are certainly healthy for you. And they’re not. That Lean Cuisine is
a prepackaged food that’s going to last for
a long period of time that has to have all this other
nonsense put in there to be able to make it last
on that shelf for that long of a period of time. So be careful with what you eat. Look at the label. Look at the nutrient list. And look at the ingredients. Does it have little
to no ingredients? Yes. All right. Probably all right. If you look at the back
of that Lean Cuisine, there’s going to be a
host of things in there. OK. Be careful with these things. Stick to your
nutrient dense foods. And try to stay away
from your energy dense foods as much as possible,
till the time calls for it. Again, we’re not
giving up our lives. I wanted to bring up marketing
schemes, and just a few right now. Marketing schemes
drive me crazy. So we talked about
the low fat one. Right? So a great documentary for
people to watch out there. Oh, I’m spacing on the
name of it right now. That’s not good. And I just brought it up. So we’re going to have
to move on right now. If it comes to me,
I’ll [INAUDIBLE].. But there were just
examples in this documentary of this poor little
girl who was trying to eat all these healthy
foods to lose weight. And she was eating
these low fat foods. And she couldn’t
lose the weight. This kept coming on. She thought she was eating–
she was eating like the Nature Valley bars. That’s just sugar
right there too. Right? She’s eating excessive
amounts of grains and granola, and stuff like that. And she thought she was
eating healthy cause it’s marketed this way. But it’s not happening for her. And it’s because these
marketing schemes are lying to her, because
not necessarily does low fat mean healthy. OK. Then we have what
drives me crazy. We look at the “Silly
rabbit, tricks are for kids.” Right? So we’re marketing towards kids. And we’re marketing
essentially candy in a bowl. Right? As their morning meal
every single day. Trix is nothing but a
bunch of sugar in there. It’s nonsense for you. It’s terrible for you. And this is what we’re trying
to say that is on our kids menu. Right? You go to the restaurant. You look at the kids menu. You have like dino nuggets,
and all these different kinds of things that are just
super breaded foods. And granted, I’m assuming
they’re on there. I don’t have kids. So I’m a little bit biased here. Right? It’s easy for them to eat those
things cause they’re tasty. But we need to try to
develop some sort of sense of nutritional
quality in our youth so they don’t turn into the 40%
of America that’s now obese, and then the over 50%
that is overweight. Right? We need to do
something about that. So this marketing
scheme towards kids, and towards parents of
what’s healthy for kids, just blows my mind as well. Then I want to go into
the hormone free chicken. Right? So hormones aren’t even allowed
to be put into chickens. OK. So it’s just not
going to happen. It’s a marketing trick. It’s for you to spend
more money on a chicken because it’s hormone free. Granted, looking
at antibiotic free is a little bit
different of a story. And you can have your own views
on antibiotics in your meats. There is research on
both sides of that. So whatever your
opinion is on that, I can understand why you’d want
to buy antibiotic free chicken or something like that. But I promise you,
no chicken has ever had hormones pumped into it. The reason why you
have gigantic chickens is due to selective breeding
and the accelerated rate of their evolutionary
process to be able to develop those genes
in their chickens to be able to have gigantic chickens. OK? So that’s just another kind of
marketing scheme out there too. Then I’m going to go
to the Fig Newtons. OK. So this nutrition label is for
these Fig Newtons over here. So you see the front over here. It’s Fig Newtons. “Made with real fruit.” Right? Well, that’s probably
healthy for me. Well, then I go
back to the label, and I see a serving
is 110 calories. Oh, it’s only got 22
grams of carbohydrate, and just 12 grams of sugar. That’s not that bad. But when I look at the serving
size, that’s two cookies. OK. I said this so many times. And I’ve stolen this
joke from somebody else. But who eats two Fig Newtons? I eat Fig Newtons by the sleeve. OK. There’s no way I’m
eating two Newtons. So you see this, and if
you don’t have the idea to understand what
serving sizes are, that person is going to eat a
half a thing of Fig Newtons, maybe get 10 cookies in there. 10 cookies is going to
result in, I don’t know. What’s 10 times 12? Yeah. That’s 120 grams of
extra sugar right there. So just be careful
about that stuff too. Just understand that
things are marketed to you to make you want them. They’re going to
make it seem healthy, and all this kind
of stuff as well. And there’s all kinds of
detrimental effects with that as well. It looks like this next
slide we’re going to come to is a bit messed up as well. So I apologize for that. But this is kind of
an important one, which is the don’t stress it. OK. So don’t stress it. I talked about how we no
longer to live to survive. We live to enjoy. So I’ve given all these rules
about just eating real food, staying away from energy
dense foods, trying to eat from the rainbow, eat nutrient
dense foods, all this, that, and the other. While that’s all extremely
important, we do live in a time where we don’t have to
live to survive anymore. We don’t only have to
eat real food anymore. So we have to develop some
sort of self discipline. OK? So we’re spoiled right now. We’re spoiled with all these
treats and fruits of life. And we should
absolutely enjoy them, because they help
bring us together. Food’s an amazing thing
for getting together with family, friends, all this
stuff, all these individuals. And it brings people together. There’s cultural
differences within foods. It’s delicious to try. Like we should not take
those things completely out of our life. How I explain it to
a lot of my clients is if you say that I am not
going to ever eat sugar again, I’m not ever going
to eat Oreos again, I’m not ever going to
do this, this, or this, if you say that, those things
still control your life. OK. So you need to understand how
to be able to apply and utilize those things in a
disciplined manner where when you
have one cookie it doesn’t turn into 100 cookies. OK? So enjoy the fruits of life. Develop self-discipline
to be able to enjoy them without putting
your health at risk. I always tell people to
remember the calendar. If you have one day
where you have a pig out, and you do all this stuff, and
all this, that, and the other, don’t let it be like, aw,
well, I’m already here now. So I’m just going to eat like
this for the rest of my life. If you look at one
day on that calendar, you’re just in one year,
and you mess up on one day, and you have all the other
days that are decent, it’s probably not going to be
the biggest detrimental effect on you. So I always say,
remember the calendar. Now, imagine when that
calendar turns out to 60 years, 70 years, 80 years. I’m going to live until I’m 125. So imagine when that
turns into 120 years. OK? What we can’t see
underneath this picture is I always talk
about the 80-20 rule. So what’s blocked
out is the 80-20. A way to develop
self-discipline for yourself is, 80% of the
time you should be living by that jerk lifestyle,
that nutrient dense, eating good foods, and real
foods for the most part. But 20% of your life, yeah. Have fun. Have fun at Christmas,
Hanukkah, whatever it is that you celebrate,
at Thanksgiving. Whatever certain holidays,
gatherings, birthdays, celebrations that bring you
together, enjoy that stuff. Don’t be the
individual there like, well, I can’t eat that
because I’m on a diet. Don’t think of it as a diet. It’s a lifestyle. You’re going to be able to eat
these things for the most part throughout your time on
this Earth and be healthy. And then still, if you
have that discipline, eat the good yummy stuff
when the time arises. Don’t just do it all the time. Develop that self-discipline. If you’re a fitness
professional out there, though, if you’re
a personal trainer, you’re something like that,
you’re a strength conditioning coach, you have to
live by the 90-10 rule. You need to be
90% good, 10% bad. We are the exception, and
we need to set the example. I’m not telling you to give up
all those things in your life. Still enjoy them. But you need to set an
example for the rest of us. We don’t really have any
time for questions right now. But I still wanted to show
my little cute picture, because I said you were
the good kind of fat. But with that it was nice
chatting with all of you. Thank you for coming
to our webinar. We always have
webinars going on. So be sure to join well
being in the spring. We have a primitive shelter. What’s it called again? SPEAKER 2: I believe that’s
primitive shelter building. I’m not exactly sure of
the exact name of it. RAMON SODANO: So be sure to just
tune into all of our webinars, especially mine, cause
I’m the coolest obviously. And yeah. Again, my name is Ramon Sodano. If you have any questions for
me about this presentation, you can contact me at
[email protected] Again, that’s
[email protected] I love talking to all of you. I know that some of the
stuff that I talk about seems a little bit off of
what you’ve heard before. So I would very much like
to explain it to you, send you the research, and all
the data that I have on it. So with that, thank
you for your time. And it’s been a pleasure.