Nutrition for Bone Health Other Nutrients and Foods

Nutrition for Bone Health Other Nutrients and Foods


So other nutrients and food. I’m just going to touch
on some of these things– magnesium, sodium or salty
foods, meat and high protein foods, caffeine again,
and soft drinks. The magnesium, normal levels
really does help protect bone. Higher intakes of
magnesium have been related to higher bone density. Magnesium is really available
in a lot of good, hearty foods that you see here at
the bottom of the slide. I do know a lot of people that
take supplemental magnesium, whether it’s for bone health. But it also helps a lot
of times with regularity. So when I see people taking
magnesium supplementation, I’m always a little
bit skeptical why. You know, a lot
of times it really does help with GI regularity. But again, this is something
that you can pretty easily get from food. So there’s not necessarily a
reason to supplement magnesium. Sodium and salty foods– we as Americans probably consume
twice as much sodium or salt as we need. And so really got to be careful,
because high salt intake can really cause your body to lose
calcium, leading to bone loss. So I would try to limit it. Most people think, well,
I don’t use a salt shaker, I’m really saving so much salt. And that’s really the
minimum of how people get sodium in their diet. Processed food, canned
foods, we really are kind of on the go,
like everything easy, like everything prepared for us. So if you are not
preparing something, seasoning it yourself,
there is usually built in a bunch
of sodium in there. So meat and high protein foods. We are also, over the
past probably 10 years, become super protein obsessed,
and protein, protein, protein. Everyone’s doing some form
of a high protein diet. So too much protein
really can be harmful. Again, as Americans,
we are pretty much consuming on a
regular basis twice as much protein is we need. Even with kids I
see parents saying, oh no, he doesn’t
eat enough protein. It is definitely untrue. So I mean, unless there is some
sort of diet restriction, issue with digestion, religious
preference, or whatever, it’s just really not the case. You just want to be careful
of how much you’re consuming. Remember, that dairy
does contain protein. It is not one of the highest
of protein-containing foods, but it does have it. But it also has
calcium in there, so you’re at least getting
a little bit of calcium from the dairy foods. Caffeine. You really want to be
careful with caffeine intake. Most people– really,
the recommendation is two to three servings. And by servings, I
mean probably if you’re having coffee or tea about
a normal sized cup, which would be 8 ounces. And for Starbucks goers,
it would be a tall. And for Dunkin’
Donuts people, it would be whatever a small is. That would be one serving. So if you’re having ventis
or large coffees every day, and having multiples, and in
the presence of inadequate bone nutrients– meaning
calcium and vitamin D– you are very likely leading to
kind of helping your body along with bone loss. Soft drinks, colas,
really I think– and this is more because
of the phosphorus. Colas, meaning brown colas, not
the lighter colors or ginger ale, Sprite, 7 Up,
all of those things don’t have phosphorus
in them naturally. But you really just
want to be careful. Carbonation in itself
is not harmful to bone. It is the phosphorus
in the colas. But again, caffeine– I’ve now seen caffeine
added to sodas that were never caffeine containing. So a lot of the orange
sodas, grape sodas now have caffeine added. And so you just
really want to know what you’re consuming,
how much you’re consuming of these things. And really, more likely,
a lot of the soft drinks sort of over
the past few decades– I feel like the people
in your 20s and 30s now really didn’t
grow up necessarily drinking milk every day. And so also there were more
energy drinks, soft drinks. You’re sort of that generation. And so that of was replacing
the calcium-rich drinks.