Increasing Fruits and Vegetables

Increasing Fruits and Vegetables


(music)NARRATOR: Just a few
decades ago,
Texas was a different place.The food we ate was grown
in our own communities.
Today, we’re moving
less and eating more.
Nearly one in three Texans are
obese, and obesity has become
a leading cause of death
in America.
But Texans are
bringing healthy back.
Across the state, communities
are being reshaped to support
and transform our
health and well-being.
Because reducing obesity
starts with growing community.
(music) ♪ ELENA MARIN, M.D.: Su Clinica Familiar is a community health center, located in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. We take care of an array
of health problems. But the one big one that we
are handling at this time is obesity. Obesity is linked to so many
other diseases: high blood pressure, stroke,
diabetes, liver disease. If we don’t control obesity,
it’s going to break the bank when it comes to
healthcare costs. ♪ BELINDA REININGER, Ph.D:
In Brownsville, like many communities, there are lots
of fast food options, there are grocery stores,
there’s convenience stores. But we didn’t see a place
highlighting fresh fruits and vegetables. TRACIE WOOD: We know obesity is
a problem in Texas, and we also know that obesity is a symptom
of the policies and environments that make it difficult to make
healthy choices in Texas. Studies have shown that if
you change the environment and make fruits and vegetables
more available, you can have an impact on
obesity. BELINDA REININGER: Surprisingly,
we are in an agricultural area and yet here, in our own
community, we didn’t have a farmers’ market. DR. MARIN: There was a state
grant that came out to help communities address
the issue of obesity. I felt that we could take some
of that money to try to develop some infrastructure to do
some really good things in Brownsville. That’s kind of how the birth
of the farmers’ market idea came into being. (rooster crows) So we have here, we have broccoli, onions. We have carrots, lettuce,
and green beans, onions, cilantro, beets, and radishes. ♪ ♪ BELINDA REININGER: The
Brownsville Farmers’ Market,Del Campo a Su Mesa, which
means, “From the fields to your table,” is a brand new
market in Brownsville selling fruits and vegetables,
and other local items to consumers right here. ♪ ROSE GOWEN, M.D.: The Market
was designed for the sole intent of reducing obesity
rates and improving diabetes rates in our community. The Market is here as a
message that the environment can help you. CATHERINE MARTIN: The Market
operates every Saturday. We have growers from
the region coming in. They bring in the fresh produce. It could be carrots. It could be broccoli, cabbage. The grapefruit does well. We’ve had a good year
for the grapefruit. MAN: How much are the eggs? VENDOR: Three dollars. ♪ BELINDA REININGER: There is a
wide range of people who come to the Market from different
walks of life, different economic strata, different
ethnic backgrounds, and that was our goal. We provide vouchers to some of
our low-income families to make it a little more affordable to
buy fresh fruits and vegetables, to introduce them to the Market,
and get used to incorporating that into their diet. DR. MARIN: Low-income families
who may not be able to afford some of the fruits and
vegetables, the voucher program has been very instrumental. ♪ BANANA CHARACTER: Hello! ♪ CATHERINE MARTIN:
We’ve had food demos. This is our first official food
demo, which is really good. We want to help them learn
about different ways to cook the food or to enjoy what
they have purchased. DR GOWEN: Suggesting that,
perhaps, these eggplants, or squash, or carrots would
taste better than the canned engages them to think,
“You know what? This is fun. I might be – they might
be right about that.” ♪ BELINDA REININGER: I think the
Brownsville Farmers’ Market has benefited the community
in a number of ways. But one of the biggest is the
presence of a healthy option that has now become a
center of discussion. And we would recommend it to
other communities for changing your environment to promote
vegetables and fruits, and a healthy lifestyle. TRACIE WOOD: Communities are
starting to come together and try to increase access to
fruits and vegetables within their own communities because
they realize there’s a problem, and they want to be part of
the solution.NARRATOR: To learn more, visit
TexasBringingHealthyBack.org