IDO PORTAL LIVE Q&A – Just Move World Premiere | London Real

IDO PORTAL LIVE Q&A – Just Move World Premiere | London Real


(upbeat music) – [Brian] Ido, this film is for you. (applauds) – I find it hard to put a suit on. – I know, I asked. (laughs) – First, I didn’t teach Conor how to move nor did I ever teach anyone how to move. I can facilitate certain
processes or open up the eyes for certain things. I’m more of a squeeze of a
lime in the end of the dish. – It will be a lot of play. Do you guys have a lot of fun? – Always. If you don’t play, it’s very
hard for you to evolve ideas. If you don’t play seriously and full on, you don’t get anywhere. – Okay. – I just bring in what I believe in and I believe in play. And I based myself in my
weaknesses, not in my strength. I want to base myself with
stuff that will serve me 50 years from now. And that’s not my one-arm
handstands, my muscles. If you’re satisfied about your practise, you’re a shitty practitioner. (man chuckles) The Cartesian state of mind. This is the problem, I
don’t listen to my body. I am my body. It’s the coin. You spin it around and you can see both sides
of the coin at the same time. Only when you stop, do you see one side. I never stopped. I’m in motion. – Good evening London! How are we tonight? (cheers) (applauds) Oh my gosh! I am so excited to be here tonight. I’ve been anticipating this
for days and weeks and months. It’s just really special having all of you people in the room. There’s people that have
travelled from Israel, from California. Where’s Tone Floreal, flew in from L.A. There’s people that came from Europe. And everyone here means
something special to me or Ido or other people in the room. So thank you so much. And welcome to the World Premiere
of Ido Portal, Just Move. (applauds) And super honoured tonight
to have Ido in the house. Thank you so much. Thank you for bringing the
family as well, Haviva’s here. And David or Doo Doo as he’s
told me, known in Israel. Thank you so much. You know, when he told me
his parents were coming. Talk about putting a little
extra pressure on me tonight. So I was like, okay. And I know your sisters are here as well. And not to mention, the
whole Movement Culture kind of A-Team over there. I’m looking at Odelia, and Hoyie and John. And it’s really special to have you here. After tonight, you’ll be movie stars. I was telling Odelia she needs
an agent after this movie. (audience laughs) And so, I’m so excited
to play this for you. Myself and the team, we’ve
been working on it for months. Four months ago, I took my
very first trip to Israel. For a boy from the beaches of California, this is something I was
dreaming about my whole life. It was a place where the stories from the Bible actually happened. I couldn’t wait to go and
yet I couldn’t wait also to spend five days Moving
with Ido and his people. So I brought my entire
team and we documented it. This is what you’re going to see tonight. But this story actually
started three years ago when this man walked into
my studio at London Real. I knew a little bit about him. He had kind of a funny name. He was a little shorter
than I thought he would be. (audience laughs) But the conversation we
had, it really changed me and it changed my life. And it changed a lot
of other people’s lives around the world. I started really looking
at myself differently and what I was doing. Even though it took me a year,
until our next conversation to actually go and start
some new Movement practises, I think it was in the back of my mind. And we had more conversations and then we walked around London. I have changed because of it. And a lot of you have seen me post these crazy YouTube videos where I’m swinging like a monkey or seen me breakdancing at 46 years old. Yes I do it, I’m very proud. One of my instructors is
here tonight, Mark Jacob. Thank you. (applauds) And I love it! I just love it. One of my instructors is here, Mark Jacob. I hired another one of my instructors, he’s our Head of Product, Mr. Zeri. Both breakdancers, old-school,
teaching me the proper way. To be honest, I was down
on the ground in my gym which Ido encouraged me
to get kicked out of, which I almost did. As Ido would say, if you
haven’t gotten kicked out of your gym, then you’re
doing something wrong. I was down there doing this Lizard Walk and my version of the
Lizard Walk is pretty, it’s pretty shocking. But I was down there and for some reason, I just thought breakdancing. In San Diego, I grew up and
went to a school that was, it was a bussed school,
so I went to school with like 80% Black, Hispanic kids and I must’ve felt this
breakdancing culture but I never actually did it. Something happened that day
and I just pursued this journey of Movement. And I can’t really explain
what happened to me but it started then. I think it started for
a lot of you as well and I think a lot of
people around the world have heard some of the
ideas that Ido talks about. They’ve changed things on the back of it. They’ve changed the way they
move, but not just that, they’ve changed the way they live. And so tonight, we’re all here to kind of honour that in a way. I spent the last three
years getting to know Ido. And the more I know
Ido, the more I realised I don’t know anything about Ido. But I believe he’s probably
a man that doesn’t sit back and celebrate or congratulate himself. Odelia can probably say
there’s probably not a not a lot of celebration
out on the road there. It’s a bit like me and there’s
a big joke in London Real, we call it bottle popping. Julian’s in the house, he
knows what I’m talking about. In England, when you do something great, you pop the bottle of champagne. I’m known for never popping a bottle. When I do something, accomplish something, I am always very critical of it and I move to the next thing. And so tonight, I thought we would just all conspire together, to slow down a little bit. Maybe force Ido to just take a step back and look at all the
great things you’ve done, the great ideas that you put out there and all the people you’ve touched because it’s really
special what you’ve done. And I just wanna also say that Ido let me into his life, into his brain over the last few years and in Israel, into his studio. I don’t know of many people
he would let do that. It was a real honour for you to let us in. I take that trust very, very seriously. So thank you for that. We’ve put together
something that honours that. Ido has not seen the movie. And so, for that it’s just
amazing that amount of trust for someone who’s worked his
whole life on these ideas. The whole team at London Real
has taken that very seriously the last 37 days or so. So I just want to finish with something I’ve been thinking about lately
which is why do I do this? Why do I bring all of these
people here into a room on a Thursday night and make this movie? I think I might have figured it out. It happened last week, I came
home on a Wednesday night. It was a little late. I was in the studio ’til about 11 o’ clock and Marianna had cooked
me this beautiful meal. She had spent like six
hours slow-cooking the lamb. And she had like pulled the
vegetables from the garden. Baby, stand up for a second. This is Marianna, by the way. And she’s 8 1/2 months pregnant. (applauds) With boy number two, which
probably wouldn’t have happened without London Real, but
that’s another speech at another movie. (audience laughs) So I was eating this meal and she had pulled the
vegetables out of the ground. And she had put the sauce in
the Vitamix and poured it over and it was just me eating. I ate it in about four minutes
and she wouldn’t even let me put a photo of it on Instagram. I was like, baby, you did
all this cooking just for me. I realised that for
Marianna, this is the way she expresses her love. She cooks and that’s the
way she expresses that. Some people, you know, some people give you a hug. Some people write you a card. Some people send a text message, maybe not your most loved ones. (laughs) For me and the team at London
Real, this is what we do. We make movies, we make multimedia about people we love and
about ideas that we love and things that we love
like transforming the world and getting people to make changes. And so, that’s what I think
we’re really doing here tonight. Ido, on behalf of myself and
the entire team at London Real, we love you very much. And this film is for you. (applauds) (light upbeat music) (audience applauds) How are you? – I’m good. – What was it like seeing that
footage from three years ago when you were in the studio? When you look at that Ido, does it seem like such a long time ago? – It seems, it seems so. Yeah, living on the road, it makes that always that, that’s always the feeling like there is a lot of life cramped into short periods of time. – I remember we had a
conversation then and I said, when is the book coming? And I think it was kind of a joke because I had heard you’re
not gonna write a book. Of course, everyone on my
show is writing a book. And then, you were like, I
don’t want to write a book. I think you said to me, don’t
walk behind me, walk beside me and you didn’t want to document things. Has that changed in the last three years? How you feel about documenting things. – There are many ways to document things. We document things, we are
documenting things, right. But we constantly have a
feeling like we are not. And we’re actually documenting
in the highest possible level I believe and a book just
cannot do justice to some things although it can serve. Yeah. I’m a little bit too young for a book. (laughs) It’s always the feeling, it’s
like, oh shit, I got a book. It’s over. (laughs) – Right. There’s some other TV cameras
in the room that aren’t ours and I guess you are doing bit
more documenting these days. Maybe. And also, you’re letting us into your space a little bit more. Is that a conscious decision
or just something that feels like the right time? – It’s really, it becomes
more about serving. And just getting it out there
to as many people as possible. There are certain timings
that must be respected. Yeah and things are just
evolving very quickly. I don’t want to, I don’t want to fight it from my own ego and small point of view, momentary, temporary point of view. So I guess it happens and I allow it more than really being
actively pursuing it. – Okay. And the nomad lifestyle,
is that something, is that a job requirement? I mean, if you want to do what you do, you have to touch people, right? I remember you told me in
the Movement experience I took from you two years ago, you said, everyone gets touched in the experience. No matter what, you and Odelia
will always touch everyone and it ultimately, is that the only way you feel like you can teach? – No, no there are many ways. This is a form of teaching. But it was important for me
in that kind of childhood of the culture. Culture is in diapers, really. The ideas in the way
that they are formatted and encapsulated. So it was important
for me to touch people. It’s like if I didn’t, if I didn’t meet you, it was
so difficult for me to really pass on some things. You made an amazing job
at presenting some of it and capturing some of it. And I still think it
will never hit the mark. You can only approximate some things. So it was super important
for me to be there, to touch. I guess it’s close to
its end in many ways. I’m not gonna continue to
travel for a lot longer. – Just slow it down a little bit. – Yeah. – Why is that? – It takes its toll. It doesn’t matter what you
do, you’ll find yourself on the other side, really. If you start from, you know you start from art,
you can finish as a banker. Start as a banker, finish as an artist. It’s just you destroy
certain things for yourself by pursuing them. I’ve travelled and taught so
much over the last eight years. I’ve met so many people and
I’ve done it in that format that it’s hard for me to get excited. The butterflies, I don’t
have anymore the butterflies. – Yeah. – And that can be a bad sign in a way. So I would like to explore
other ways of doing it and testing it onwards
and working with people and practising myself and passing it. Yeah, in a potent way, I wanna be full on. I don’t want to be
doing things half-assed. – I find it so hard to
document your ideas, harder than any other
person I’ve had on the show. I really spent three
years talking to you and I feel like I now know less, in a way. We managed to capture a
few of those brief moments. It’s like (imitates blast of air) and if you don’t get
it, it’s gone forever. We managed to capture a few
and to show these looks at you that maybe won’t be captured again. I don’t know, it’s like this
strange thing with you where you don’t have this
Standard IP rattled out and here’s chapter four in
my book and chapter six. It’s like these ideas
that are so hard to grasp that sometimes, they’re just gone. I guess you hear that a lot. – Yeah. – And I guess there’s no solution. The thing is just to keep communicating. – Yeah, yeah. You keep keep doing this from different places, from different areas. We’ve done a few of them, right? And they all bring something. And then I can do my own thing and some amazing people
here doing their thing. You just keep repackaging
it and changing the lenses. Something gets more potent. Some things can also get more diluted, but other things is like folding metal. You know, you get more resiliency. And we need that, I’ve
really enjoyed like standing on shoulders of many people
who’ve done all this work. Like a lot of the ideas in this movie, they come from people who sit here. Like some of this stuff is
from my mother and from Odelia and from my cousin. It’s a lot of people here that contributed and I just take it, put it
into my own washing machine and then I puke it out somewhere else. Yeah and sometimes as we say,
disappears through the cracks. That vomit is gone. Other times, people are
a little bit more brave because it’s not, it’s not always tasting so good. There is a challenge
in the way that it is. We’ve alleviated it in some ways. In other ways, it’s still difficult. It can be aesthetically
pleasing, it’s nice but there is still a fair amount of six-packs on that screen. There are still one-arm handstands. There are still friendly stuff so you can relate. Hopefully you can relate
to what is behind it. – Why bring the family,
all of your people here? – They brought themselves. (laughs) I didn’t bring anyone. – Is that ’cause your
parents probably don’t ever get to see you in action, do they? – My mom gets to see me a lot in action. She’s present in all the big events. She’s an amazing practitioner. My sister as well, has
been participating in the last few years, my
younger sister, Gili. And then less, my father, my big sister, they have less of an
opportunity, so this was nice. – Okay and your mom will be
with us this weekend, right? For the experience.
– Yes. I can’t wait. What was I gonna ask you? What’s it like to watch
Odelia talk about you? The most emotional piece, yeah. – Yeah?
– For me, yeah. – This and seeing Pascale. Yeah, it’s powerful. Odelia, she speaks about me
in front of me, this side. But this was not in front of me. I was not there, that was different. It’s weird, right. Like it’s weird to sit there to watch to watch yourself. I’m not sure we have the
faculties to work with it, to sit on these stages, fuckin’. (laughs) Yeah.
– Yeah, it’s weird. – Yeah, I was watching
you from across the row and I was thinking, how it must be weird to watch a movie about you. Yeah. – Yeah, it’s weird. We’re not equipped for it, you know. I see big stages. I’m involved now with
some big TV projects. And I’m working within the cinema world. And I meet people who
stand on huge stages. I’ve been cage-sided in front
of 20,000 people, you know hearing people scream your name
as you fight for your life. It’s weird moments and from outside, they look totally
different than from inside. But people rarely mention it. They rarely speak about
it in an honest way. It’s important to put it out there. – To say that it’s strange. – That it’s strange, that it’s different. It’s not what it looks. That you do (whispery yelling). Sometimes you do it almost from outside that people who do it,
they do it from outside. They bring themselves into the audience and then they can do it. But it’s not your own gesture. This is how I sit. I don’t sit, that’s how I sit. So that’s how I’m gonna sit here. But most people don’t, they
have these other concepts, right of they should look, how they should sit in this kind of scenario. I respect that but it’s also important
for me to show my side. – Is that why you keep your
teaching environments small? I mean, is that why I’ll
probably never see you on stage with the microphone on
the side of your mouth teaching 2,000 people? – Yeah, I don’t what you can
do that in that scenario, what you can really teach there. Definitely not the kind of
stuff that I try to work with. And it’s not technically
demanding, it becomes less and less technically demanding. It’s the complexity of the ideas. The actual performance,
it looks like nothing. Again, you see it, you’ll
never think much about it. Maybe there is an impressive moment, but the real thing
happens in the background. The real thing is the
backstage, it’s behind this. And that really can be
achieved, that real thing in a certain size of a group,
in a certain connection. And then other things can be
communicated on larger stages but yeah, I don’t really, I don’t really believe a workshop setting will work well there. I’ve tried it, I’ve taught 800 people. I’ve taught 800 people,
I’ll never do it again. Shit. (laughs) – And so this weekend, I
think we’ve got 90 of us or a hundred of us in the room. I mean, two years ago,
I took a very similar two-day experience with you. It just shattered my
whole concept of Movement. I remember I got back
to the gym on the Monday and I looked around
and it just looked like a bunch of aliens doing alien things. And I was like, well why I am here? Why are you doing that? And so, I ended up getting
rid of my personal trainer and started doing these other things. For people that don’t know,
why does that happen with you? You know, spend a couple days with you, why do they just all of a sudden
look at things differently? – It’s not me at all. It’s the paradigm shift. It’s the climbing of the ladder of memes. And it’s the movement from
simplicity to ultimate complexity that happens everywhere across
the board with everything. This universe started so
simple and look where we are. And where are we going. It goes to this hyper complexity. So once you that climb that ladder, it’s extremely difficult to go back. That’s the heart of it. It has nothing to do with me,
I’m just a container of it. I present it, I do it. Sometimes I do it in a good way. Sometimes I do it in a shitty way. My sense of humour, maybe
touches some of you, others completely cannot relate to it. I’m just a filter. The paradigm shift, the
climbing in the ladder. That is very hard to go back. And it takes a toll when you do go back, because we all do go back, certain times. We go back to our
pleasures, or simple things. But it takes a toll. Once you have it in
your mind, that there is another stage in
complexity, there is a pull. You have to pay a price if you go back, which a lot of people do and they don’t even realise that they do. They pass by ideas,
they’re inspired by it. Then, when it come the
time to actualize it, they discover difficulties,
so they retrace back. They go back to some form
of a simpler practise. But in the back of their mind, they’re not doing the real thing. And it keeps poking. Poking. It can poke for 70 years before it pops. It can pop in the last moment, in the last five minutes of your life. – When you realised that you needed to get back to something else. – Yeah. – You’ve made it too complex. – No, you’ve made it too simple. You went back to simplicity
because it’s comforting. It’s known. You know you jumped
into practising yourself in very complex ways but you
can also lose your way there. So what do you do when you lose your way? Most people just go back to
simple things that they know. Okay, I know I can pump those weights. Or I know I can do this
section or that section. It’s familiar. And that’s, I know what I’m
doing, so I’m going back to it. But in your mind, it’s not the real deal. And there is some problem about it, the fact that you keep going with it. And we all have it, not only
with the Movement practise, with everything. With relationships, with a lot of things. – I remember I complained
to you in that episode three years ago, that I wasn’t happy in my Movement practise. And then a year later, I complained again. So it was on the back of my mind, but I hadn’t done anything about it. – If you’re satisfied about your practise, you’re a shitty practitioner. (chuckles) I’m not satisfied with my practise. I don’t have a single moment where I reach the place where I’m content. If you’re content, you’re
a low-level practitioner. Perhaps that’s not your
major focus orientation. Who’s a happy artist? Who’s a happy craftsman? Those are people who can make do. You’re not satisfied because
you want the next thing. You need to keep on pushing
that rock up the slope, the Sisyphus, the Camus
analogy, Albert Camus. Push the rock up the slope and then it goes rolling back down. There is never a moment you’re on top. It starts to roll back down. That’s the game until the
last moment, on this planet, just keep pushing back the rock. So start to understand why is it that we need that process. It’s enough to feel our
hearts, what we said there. – Yeah, X marks the spot and go there. And then try to enjoy it. You told me that having
fun when it’s not fun. The art of having fun when it’s not fun. Yeah, we say that a lot in the studio now when things get tough. That and har haKodesh. Did I say that right? (laughs) – Not bad. – Yeah. How do you say the fear of Ido? (chuckles) – Har hakIdo. – Har hakIdo. Yeah, with probably a
little bit of that too. What else you involve these days? Are you still doing some
things with Bollywood and other things? – I still do some things
there for a big production. Movement Design for the main characters. It’s kind of a superhero
movie out of India. Very big and elaborate thing. I did the Movement stuff for it. And then, we are shooting, we are working on a TV series that in which I do some work with the best. The best of the best
in all different fields and bring together this
message of Movement for everyone. We’re more similar than
different, we’re all moving. I’m doing a lot of teaching stuff. I do collaboration with some
of the biggest corporations out there involved with
branding Sports Movement clothing. Most passionately, I work
with my own research. And sharing my own research with a very close group of students. That’s the real heart of
it, the rest is just kind of whatever. – That’s a lot of stuff. – There is a lot of stuff. And that’s only part of it, actually. – Okay. We had lunch in Tel Aviv with the crew. It was like a five-hour lunch. And Ido just dropped science
on all of us and then about, what were you talking about? Nutrition, supplementation,
the history of the world. You just did it and now and because of it, I’m now taking my magnesium and my boron and all that other stuff. But you told us all of this
information, but then you said, you’re like, Brian, I
don’t talk about nutrition ’cause I don’t feel like
I’ve mastered it, right? Sounded pretty masterful at lunch. (laughs) A couple of the guys put their phones out while you were and just try to record it. I made them delete it. – Yeah, that’s exactly the
problem, it all sounds masterful. That’s exactly the problem. We don’t know shit and then
everything sounds masterful. That’s why I don’t talk about
stuff I don’t know about. – You don’t want to be that guy–
– Yeah. that’s talking about stuff
that he doesn’t absolutely really know. – In order to be on top of
it, is you have to devote many hours a day for it. I’ve devoted 20 plus years. I’m reading three to four books a week. I don’t really meet, I never met a single person who I think even done the
basic reading material, the basic course reading
list around Movement, not even a single person. In terms of the lateral
knowledge that you need in order to talk about
such complex phenomena. So why would I make the mistake? Why would I talk about orthopaedic surgery if my sister spent a decade just trying to get the grasp and trying to get into a form
of understanding how much she doesn’t understand. I can’t do it. Nutrition, I don’t devote
so many hours a day to study Nutrition. It’s not a major thing
that I will talk about and contribute. I have some ideas. I have some basic understandings. This I feel more comfortable sharing. I have some basic ideas of philosophy, but I cannot hang out with
a professor in philosophy. I have some understanding about history but I’m not a historian. And then I tried to limit
myself in that field to bring some pieces
of information together and still, I make many
mistakes all the time. – Okay. I wanna take a few
questions from the audience. But first, I wanna ask you, you’re off to the desert next week. – Yes. – I hear and what is the plan out there in Las Vegas? – I’m gonna cross Las Vegas on a bike. – Really? – No. (laughs) – My, Israeli humours just gets. – I actually did that last
time, it turned out horrible. Yeah, it’s like in the prep, in the prep for one of the fights, Conor needed someone to ride with him and do the daily cardio or whatnot. It’s like everyone disappeared, you know. Who’s gonna do it today? Oh, I guess it’s me. And I never rode bikes. It was a 25 kilometre ride. Desert, summertime, Las Vegas. Slight uphill the whole time. Leading the ride to Olympic cyclists and Conor in top shape. It was horrible. Horrible. (laughs) I finished it, they always, the car next to me kind
of was offering me like jump on, jump on, it’s okay. I’ll finish it, but it was rough. (laughs) So I did that before. Now I’m going to to help out on Camp a little bit. Last few weeks, some sharpening up. And now it’s less contact. So we can do more work. Cardio starts to taper off. So, going to help out. – It’ll be a lot of play, do
you guys have a lot of fun? – Always, always. It’s always a lot of fun. It’s always a lot of play. It’s never serious and
it’s always super serious. It’s this combination. It’s like, it’s not the
shitty playful approach, it’s the serious playful approach. – Okay, okay. So you two are very much
the same in that sense that you value that. – Yeah, yeah. You don’t get there to those
places without having both. If you don’t play, it’s very
hard for you to evolve ideas, to really run after things, to be receptive to your own needs because play is a way for us
to kind of test the grounds, to understand what do I need. Who am I within this and then if you don’t play
seriously and full on, you don’t get anywhere. So people don’t respect play. Those are people who don’t play seriously. And then people who don’t employ play, they are not high performers. – You’re gonna be maybe working with some
high-performance athletes in your TV show et cetera. Do you expect all of them
to have an element of play if they’re at the top of their game? – I don’t give a fuck
what they have, that’s it. What they have, I don’t expect anyone, I just bring what I have
and what I believe in. And they can take it or not. That’s it. I just bring what I believe in and I believe in play. I’m a big believer in play. If you’re too serious for
that, you can’t respect that, then I’ll go to someone else. I’ll just keep going to someone else. – What did you make of the
Mayweather-McGregor media circus? And were you ever gonna
be involved in that? ’cause I was watching
everything and thinking, Oh my god, how’s Ido gonna
deal with the stop in Toronto? – Yeah, well. I didn’t go. I didn’t want to go. I thought it would be
fun to see it at home. Yeah, if it was a jet everyone
taking everyone around. They also, because it’s such
a hectic week, actually, the Movement thing is very useful there. And they asked me to be there. Conor asked me but I could not, I was very busy doing
things here in Europe. And then just was not truly needed. What do I think about it was, it was good fun. I think it was good fun, way too many sore asses out there. – Too sensitive. – Yeah. Yeah, too sensitive. Don’t understand what it’s about. Never been inside, don’t
know what’s going on watching from home, you
know, writing something, writing some comment. Never been part of it, whether on the boxing stage or whether on the multi-million stage or whether on the media-circus stage, or whether on the popstar stage, there is so many layers there. So it’s not what it seems from outside. – Okay. Dana White said that
the fight starts there, getting inside each of his head’s. Is that true? – It can be. We’ve seen it before. It can be. Always Conor tells me,
personally, doesn’t matter. So whether this, it doesn’t matter. Get them in, get them in the
octagon, get them in the rings. Doesn’t matter what happened before. He completely does not rely
on it, nor try to do it. There is nothing, there is no prep. There is no script, there is nothing. There is just reality there,
that’s what I appreciate. It’s not my way. As you see, it’s very different. But I appreciate the honesty. I appreciate him being him. What you see is what you get. And then, so I don’t think he relies on it and I think Floyd is very
experienced and measured. You could see that moment with the touch and he was not fazed, he was yeah, he was okay. He could have been the drama
queen, but he chose not to. – Yeah, like he chose not to react, that was his reaction. – Yeah. – But I don’t know of anyone
that’s ever disrespected Mayweather truly like that. So that must have been a
new experience for him. – Yeah, there are many
new things there which one thing that is a little
bit ridiculous in my eyes, every expert is talking about what is gonna be, what’s
gonna happen, what’s gonna, how is this gonna unfold
and all the expert opinions. Let’s not mistaken ourselves,
there’s so many new things about this scenario. This never happened. It never happened to Conor. He never met such a guy. And it never happened to Floyd. And this thing is totally new,
unfolding reality as it is. And black swans exist. It’s just a totally new thing. It’s a boxing match, that’s
true, but have you ever seen when was the last time you
saw someone, for example, just flailing arms around,
going like a windmill in a boxing match? That can turn out very badly. (audience laughs) Right? But also what happens when that case hits? When, in my own field and fields, I know that sometimes, even a raw beginner is very difficult to handle and it’s its own thing. Some fighters are really bad at handling
aggressive beginners. I’ve seen it many times. Conor is not a beginner, but
he comes from a different world and he has a different
way of doing things. And he can turn around, he
can do all kinds of things. The timing is a bit off,
it’s a little bit awkward. And I think that’s totally new. On the other hand, Floyd is a master and he’s been dealing
with a lot of experts, but all these experts have
similar things in them, they’re all boxers as well. So I don’t think there
is anything really known. You say, oh yeah, yeah of course. Yeah, it’s a very difficult task that Conor took up on himself. That makes me respect him even more. He goes again, back into it. There is nothing known,
there is a lot to lose. People think there is nothing to lose. You don’t know what you’re talking about, you never were in a fight, probably. Of course, there is a
lot to lose, every loss is extremely problematic. Every loss, I’ve seen it, from close, it’s not a loss in a tennis match. It’s much more severe,
emotionally draining, problematic, very few people can shrug off a loss. – Yeah, I’ve known fighters
and they will remember the details of the loss to that day. And you don’t wanna bring
it up, even the ones that are the most well-rounded
and the most stoic. – For sure, I remember my losses. I remember things and I was not a fighter. I remember my losses, I
remember small tricks. I remember, if you’re really meticulous and if you’re going for it
full on like these two, a loss is severe. You will dig into that wound
for the rest of your life. – You posted on Instagram and you said, boxing shmoxing, money schmoney. You know this is about
Conor taking a big chance and knowing he’s taking this huge chance. I think you were like,
you were noting the art of just that pure fact alone. – Yeah, I have to speak about it as a friend and that’s a personal angle. I just feel I just have this appreciation
for my friend doing it in the way that he’s doing it. Maybe it’s not objective,
maybe I stand on the stage so people expect me, all kind of there but I have to be also honest. And then, I just feel in awe
of that thing going again. I know who he is on a personal level. I’ve spent the time in his
house, living with him. I’ve passed through losses and wins. And I know, I just have
an appreciation for another one of those. – You said his style isn’t your style. – Yeah. – Well, what would be your style? – I’m not extravagant in that way. I find it hard to put a suit on. – I know, I asked. (laughs) – I find it, I have a lot there are many differences, I don’t even know where to start. I’m not gifted in many ways. And I’ve based myself in my
weaknesses, not in my strength. It’s very different, me and him. I’ve built myself around my weaknesses. I didn’t build myself around my strengths. For example, there are
students here of mine, most of which have based
themselves on their strengths. It’s an inherent change
between me and them and it will always be. So I didn’t base myself on my strength. I pursued what I’m weak at. There were very few shiny
moments for me, easy moments. Maybe I should have pursued music because that’s something
that I’m gifted in, maybe. Maybe I could’ve pursued plastic arts. I received a lot of
talents from my father, also from my mother, but in
the plastic arts and music, I can do it, I could do it. I always drew very well,
but I didn’t go with that. I was gifted in school and
in logic, in computers, in mathematics, certain things. I didn’t base myself in
that, I went to something that actually was difficult
and then I met fears. And then I based myself on fears. So it’s a very different thing. I think that’s an inherent change, inherent difference between us. – Did you ever meet anyone like you? – I don’t think anyone
meets anyone, right? – Come on. Have you ever meet anyone that you say, okay, that person actively
goes for their weaknesses. – Yes, yes. Yes, there are such people. They’re rare and far between. But there are such people. I have some students like
that, but they are very few compared to the rest. – Okay, okay. You’re up for answering a few questions? – Sure. – Okay, we have some
microphones coming around. If you just raise your hand up really high if you wanna ask a question. You, sir over there. There’s a guy right behind
you with a microphone. You could stand up. – [Man] Absolutely. First, Brian, what an
amazing documentary, man. That was absolutely fantastic. Ido. (Ido applauds) There you go. (audience applauds) I have to say, I’m a
huge Conor McGregor fan. You must know what’s gonna
happen to your career if he beats Floyd Mayweather. And I just have to ask. Not your career, that’s
a really wrong word, but if you’re the one who
has taught him to move and move from MMA to boxing
and beat the most famous boxer in recent times, I just
want to ask you, man, have you thought about that? Are there any, if McGregor
wins, have you thought about what’s gonna happen to your
life, if that’s the case? – Thank you. – Thank you. We’ll keep it very real. So let’s correct a few basic things. First, I didn’t teach Conor how to move nor did I ever teach anyone how to move. I can facilitate certain
processes or open up the eyes for certain things. Definitely, my contribution
to the way that Conor fights is minimal, extremely minimal. Only it was sexy and
exposed in certain times and presented in certain ways where it received a lot of attention
because I’m the odd card. And I can do some aesthetic things and I presented a different approach. I’m more of a squeeze of a
lime in the end of the dish. And I give just that, just that twist. Conor, himself, shared
recently some thoughts that differ from mine. He believes there is was more of a role to it. I’ll respect his opinion
but I’ll have to disagree. That’s one thing. About my career, I don’t think
it will be much effected. The major point of
exposure already happened. The clips were out
there, they’re out there. Things, the connection is made. The Instagram pages, the
Facebook things were effected. Now it’s another small
exposure here or there. Actually, the fact that
I stayed was my interest, not in that, but my interest
actually in that riddle, and our connection,
our personal connection which was the most important thing for me. But really, every time,
it’s this fuckin’ riddle. Well, what’s gonna happen? Just like all of us feel, right? And then to be involved and
to offer some insight into it and then to be in charge
of some experiments with the guinea pig. And then to send him, that’s
really interesting for me. That’s the misunderstood part. So of course I get a
lot of exposure from it. I also get a lot of hatred from it. I also get a lot of idiots from it. There is just a huge culture of all of this together. This would also bring another layer of it. I’ll tell you it’s worth it. On the sense of exposure,
I have to tell you, it’s not worth it, especially me, through my eyes. How I live my life, this
what close people would know. Maybe it would sound bullshit to you. I’m already out of that game. I’m already free. I’m already, I’m standing on two legs. I don’t need anything. I don’t need another
Euro in my bank account. I finished that. If I was maybe needing
that in order to feel good, maybe I would’ve needed,
but I’m not doing it from that perspective. And everyone involved knows that. Thank you for that question. – Cool, thank you. (audience applauds) – Some more, raise ’em up. Lazo, right there, can you stand up. – Thank you Brian and Ido. Very, very touched and some
of the moments in that movie was just heart-warming. Two-part question, Ido. First of all, what scares
you now, personally? And what scares you about the
globe and society in general? – That’s a good question. What scares me is the complete meaningless of everything. That’s what scares me. – Me too. (laughs) We talked about that once. – Yeah. I just, that’s the biggest scare. And my scare for society is the fact that many
people don’t realise it. Those are the two parts of it. If only people realised,
they would have immediately got in a different orientation
how we live our lives, how we conduct ourselves,
how we connect together. What we mean to each other. How do we construct our reality. And then, on the other hand, it’s because scary moments bring us together. So I think this is, this
is the two big things here with fear. I answered it? – Who else? Yes sir, you here. Could you stand up, please. – Yeah, thanks for the
movie and the show tonight. I was listening to one of the
things you’re saying on stage and it struck me as a contradiction from something we watched in the movie. In the movie, there’s this
idea of beginner mindset and constant playing and trying, exposing yourself to new fears. And on stage, you’re
saying about nutrition and not wanting to say much because you don’t know much about it. And it seems like a contradiction to me. I was wondering if you could document, maybe either clear it up or say why in one domain say, philosophising or teaching or educating, you’ll only
do it if you’re an expert, wherein the domain of Movement, it’s about actually going forward and
having that beginner mindset, strikes me as a contradiction. I was wondering if you could talk on that. – You misunderstood. First, I’ll address the
part of contradiction. If you didn’t find many contradictions, actually within the
film, every moment then I’m disappointed because for me, a true sign of intelligence is how many contradictions
can you hold in your mind at the same time. As Albert Einstein said,
that’s the whole game. And as the misconception, I will not lecture and teach nutrition. It doesn’t mean I don’t
pursue it as a practitioner. So the beginner mindset is
the practitioner’s side. I would practise and
aspire to become better at new things that I don’t understand but I don’t place myself as
a teacher for those things if I’m not feeling, I mean in an advanced
enough stage in the game. So two different modes. I, myself, still research nutrition. I don’t lecture it because
I don’t research it enough. – Can you talk about this contradiction as in the more developed
or intelligent you are, the more contradictions
you’d hold in your mind. Can you explain that? – How much can you hold in
your mind now at the same time? That’s really the sign of, that’s IQ, but the real IQ,
not the shitty test called IQ. That’s intellect How much can you hold at the same time and the saying goes, can you hold, a sign of intelligence is the ability to hold two contradictory ideas
in your mind at the same time because contrary to what we feel often, life is not this or that, it never is. And then hence, if you want
to feel a piece of reality, what’s the first thing you gotta do? Hold two contradictory
things in your mind. That’s Daoism. That’s the heart of Buddhism. That’s the heart of everything. That’s the heart of a lot of, it sits in the heart of religions as well but with them, repackaged,
repackaged, repackaged and sometimes we err on presenting a over simplistic picture. Oh this is right or this is right. There is no right. There’s just a complexity
because we move into complexity. – That I get. We’re gonna go with a
couple more questions. Mr. Zeri. If you could stand up too. Any females have some questions? – [Zeri] Hi Ido. – Hi. – So, I’m a B-boy or a breakdancer
as some might understand. I’ve been doing this for 15
years and in the last years, when I saw your work,
I got really influenced and inspired by everything
you were talking about. Lately, a lot of B-boys in my culture, a lot of high-level dancers, they start looking at your work. They start appreciating your work. I had conversations with
people in some competitions or battles, I see people do Lizard Walks together with their own movements. What I miss is, I’ve never
heard Ido talk about B-boying or breakdance and I just wanna hear your opinion on breaking. – First, I’m very surprised, actually. My impression is that B-boys don’t really think
highly of my work at all. I actually value it. I think it’s a very intelligent culture. I don’t think you should
start to do Lizard Walks. They sit lower on the chain
than the stuff that you’re doing in many ways. I think the Lizard Walk is a great tool sometimes to open people
to more elaborate ideas. It’s one of the cultures
that I appreciate the most along with the parkour culture. These young, street cultures. Let’s say, let’s call them young because they’re not 500 years old. And I think they are some of
the most creative cultures. Although some other movement cultures think they’re creative,
they don’t even scratch what B-boy, what breaking, what
culture of hip-hop is doing. It’s incredibly creative. Which means like in one
month, there is more creation going on than in the whole
evolution of something like tricking. Which is great but I
also have to say my truth observing from outside. The amount of creativity
going on is incredible, rhythmicallity, creativity, style. Style on the level of Bukowski’s style, you know, some dogs have
more style than men. There is more style in
prison than out of prison. But it’s so important, right, to have style. So I’m a big fan. And I don’t think that
the culture is a fan because they are, they’re
within their own practise. And I think they get some
sufficient mechanics going on, sufficient, but I think maybe
on a philosophical level, they can benefit a lot
from those ideas and maybe some people are evolving
into it, philosophically. On the level of practicality, maybe some tools here or there, definitely not the Lizard Walk. Thank you for that. – Can you speak on parkour
while you’re at it? – Yeah, another one of
my favourite cultures. I’m still a person. I still did not evolve
into another status. And so I, these are my
personal opinions that is often misunderstood because
I’m some prophet or some some other wankery title. (audience laughs) So in the sense, in that sense as a person I have my favourites and I love parkour, especially kind of the early generation that started the phenomenon. How they, with what kind
of philosophical tools they practised. How the relationship with
fear which taught me a lot, it kind of gave me the
terminology to talk about it. And I always felt it but I didn’t, I wasn’t really confronted with it, like we did in Israel together. And I appreciate many things in there. Are there shitty things, well of course. The process is poor. Breakdancing is another. Poor, poor, poor process. Poor instruction. Poor understanding of many things, but there is also some beautiful things. And I try to learn from
it, the good and the bad. I try to bring it into another culture which practises around another idea. A lot of similarities and
some differences as well. – Okay, okay thank you for that. – We’ll take two more questions. Any women first, yes. Can we get her a microphone? Can you stand up? – Hi, I’m a boxer. I box for a club here in London. And I can see how so
much of what you’re doing would be so beneficial
to a lot of the kids who are boxing at the club where I’m at. But a course like I’m
going on this weekend is really expensive, so I wonder if and I’m
not trying to question whether you’re money-influenced or not, but I wonder if you
ever think about how to transfer this knowledge to
more people for less money. – Yeah, I do transfer the
knowledge in many different ways. I don’t think there is
a price that is right. There is no, what’s the, what’s cheap is expensive. And what would be cheap for those kids will be super expensive
for some kids from Gaza or from Africa. There is no price and hence,
I didn’t base myself in it from the beginning. I based the price on other factors. I’m involved also with
a lot of charity work which I will never talk about
because it’s totally bull-shit to do charity and to talk
about it, in my eyes. (applauds) Which I now I just did, so I even (audience laughs) – Contradiction. – I just that beautiful moment right
there is eating the cake and leaving it whole. And I work from the inside-out. And that concept is something
that I looked back in history and my own personal history
and the world’s history. I work with a very tight
group and that group does another circle and that. That, that, that, that, that. And I think this is the
quickest way to get out there. I already, I think I’ve
proved it in many ways. So my message will go out
there, extremely powerful. And it will be available for people with the right state of mind, potency and quality alongside of it. I could have spread some
things, lose some qualities. I chose to do the right mixture. I chose to put a certain price on it and to make it a little bit
difficult for people to come. We’re not really nice,
we’re not business-oriented, so we don’t. We make very, very simple choices. You know, I went to
buy these clothes today in a shop here in London that is very similar. I was like, do you have
this in a different size? No. There was none of the,
let me try to check, no. It’s just this size. And then the store opens at 11 and closes at seven. Or a coffee shop in
Berlin that opens, when? From 12 until three. When do you drink coffee? But there is something there. There is something about
that it’s the same. Now, is it about optimal
service right now, no. I’m not about optimal service right now. I’m about doing my thing over a decade. I’m about doing my thing in the long term and that’s what I’ve been trying to do. And I absolutely think you’re right. These tools should be
approachable and accessible for these kids. And it will allow them to develop into their own personal best and also to develop a community which is far better than
our current version. So, still it’s in my mind. – Speaking of decade, what
are you gonna be doing in a decade? – I have no idea, no idea whatsoever. I continue to react, I continue to unfold. I continue to observe, to
look back, to look forward. And still also being a lot in that moment. Maybe I think, maybe, I reach the end expansion. And then I start to go in again, maybe that’s the right thing. That’s where I will be. Maybe I will go avant garde. Maybe I will go inwards. I reach this size, now I decrease the size until I’m left alone. (chuckles) – So you’re gonna disappear. – Maybe. We all are gonna disappear,
but maybe also the ideas should be evolving in such a way because I do get nauseated
from my own work. – I know. Yeah, you didn’t want to
do Movement for this film ’cause you didn’t want it
to be about you, right? You want it to be about the ideas. – Yeah. Yeah, there is. I can still use it. I can still wow. I can still back-flip
from here and sit down but also, I want to not
base myself in those things. And I don’t want to
continue to, it’s temporary. Why would I invest so much into it. It would be nice to
have a small beer belly. It would be nice. (chuckles softly) It would be nice. It would be nice to, it would be nice to not
base myself, you know many times people think
it’s about the body. It’s not about the body,
it’s about movement. They confuse the two things. It’s not about health. I’m not about health. There is some orientation that are very healthy. I never drink. I never smoke. I practise my body but I also
destroyed my body in practise. So, obviously it’s not about health. I don’t wanna base myself
on this temporary thing. Some people came to me recently. Someone had told me like, how do you, how are you doing? You lost a lot of muscles. I said, yeah, they got in my way. They had to go. It was never about that. – Or the health. It’s about the Movement. – Yeah, what is health? It’s another nauseating concept. It’s another, what are you clinging to? You’re all going, you’re all going in the other direction. So like (scratchy growling) I’m clingy. You know that all the body-builders with, you know the dried prune face and the 16-year old body, it’s sad. It’s sad. And what are we clinging to, you know? The health of the, but
life is not about that. And when you base yourself only on that, you do reach some problematic moments. Life is not about beauty. It’s not about the aesthetics of it. So, it’s important for us to practise some of our orientation towards
more long-lasting things. Ultimately, nothing is
long-lasting, perhaps or maybe we do carry it, who knows. I want to base myself with stuff that will serve me 50 years from now. And that’s not my one-arm
handstands, my muscles. It’s not about the aesthetics of it. It’s not about the sexiness of it. – It’s about the adventure,
it’s about developing yourself. It’s about pushing
yourself or discovering. – It’s even not about some of those things because these things will also be dead. How much can you push yourself? Okay, so you’re gonna hit 50. And then what? And then you compare yourself back. It’s like, no I’m not
pushing myself as before. So you know, even for the hardest workers, it’s important sometimes
to stop pushing yourself and to realise don’t
base yourself in that, in another addiction. I’m the hardest worker,
but now it’s easy work because you just push, you’re used to it. Let’s see you not push yourself. That’s, for me, huge. It’s very difficult. – You tried that? – Yeah, recently my dear cousin was here and told me to stare at the ceiling. So I practised. (laughs) – How did it go? – It lasted a few minutes. I stayed in bed. I tried hard and it
didn’t work really well but I’m a new practitioner. (laughs) But really, really it’s
not a joke, really. That’s my lesson right now
with that specific thing because we don’t want to be in a blur. We want to be present so
we have to make the choice again now. And I don’t make a choice
anymore when I work hard ’cause I’ve worked hard all of my life. I’ve outworked everyone. I’ve made many sacrifices. Now it’s easy work. I’m just the hard-worker,
so it’s easy work. So I’m not choosing again. I’m just going on automatic. Oh yeah, yeah I’ll outwork him. Choose again, what do you wanna do? And sometimes what it takes
is to stare at the ceiling. – Well, we had lunch with the crew. You told them about this new
meditation technique you had with your eyes open. And they all went back to the
flat and tried it that night. – Uh-huh. – And it didn’t work out so well for them. Is that something you still try to do? – I do a lot of different
things and currently, I’m doing something else,
but I’ve done it for many, many years, yeah. The Crying meditation. – Keep your eyes open for long periods– of time–
– Yeah, no blinking. – No blinking for, sometimes, hours. It’s interesting. – Yeah. I couldn’t tell if you were
just winding my crew up but you’re not–
– No, not at all. – Not at all. Some people here have done, with me, extended periods of time of that. It’s powerful. – What happens? – Well first, you gotta cry. There is no other way to sustain it because you’re not wetting
the surface of the eye. And once the tears start
flowing down, continuously, there is a change in the state of mind in the emotional capacity. It’s something that I
discovered alone, maybe. Some meditation teacher, probably
someone had done it before but I didn’t learn it from anyone. I just started to do it
out of certain intuition and then when the tears starts
to roll down and you stay. And it keeps going for an
hour, you’re just standing and you just cry, it’s very difficult. It takes a long time to get there because people just blink. And then, there is a change. There is an emotional
release, there is a change in the state of who you are,
in the state of the awareness. Also, not focusing the
eyes, not moving the eye. It’s another form of undoing what we need and we are all about doing. And we can’t get to the next
level because the next level is about undoing. It’s about staring at
the ceiling sometimes. – Okay, two more questions then we’re done.
– sure. Raise your hands up. I’m gonna go one to the upper level here. Yeah, you. Was there a female, all right. We’re gonna go with Garreth’s sister. Can you stand up? So Garreth is one of my
former banking colleagues. And he’s the only one that
comes to my movie premiers. Garreth, stand up. Yes he always supports me. He’s the first one to buy tickets. Thank you Garreth.
– Thank you very much. Why are you here, by the way? Garreth, why do you keep coming, tell me. – I’m just very impressed that you’ve, yeah you’ve got, well
basically Brian was my, he’s my Broker actually,
he worked for ICAP. I worked for–
(imitates soft crowd cheer) I worked for Lehman Brothers, actually, which no longer exists. Brian never really
wanted to be the Broker. He was always taking to
me like butchery classes. He was always like going
on exciting adventures. And it’s nice to see him
finally kind of doing something he really loves and it’s
really exciting to see. – Thanks Garreth, thanks. (applauds) – So Sir, you gave me a
wonderful introduction to my question in that last
conversation with Brian ’cause I’m more about
health, I’m a doctor. In fact, I’m perhaps,
I think the most simple yet most complex form of doctor. I’m a G.P., that means
General Practitioner and just like you, that means
I’m constantly practising and striving to learn. I think the human body
is amazing and magical and every single one of us has
an amazing and magical body if we listen to it. And I am watching that movie thought, well you listen to your
body more than anyone I’ve ever encountered and you
feel it, but then you hurt it and then you carry on. And I guess, I wanna know. There’s two parts to this question. I want to know what the
worst injury you had was and how you raise above that. How you dealt with that? – Thank you. I don’t have any injuries, never really injured myself badly. I broke a lot of noses, well,
actually people broke my nose many times. I had some teeth flying out of my mouth, getting kicked in the face. – It’s Capoeira and boxing, Capoeira.
– yeah, yeah. – Yeah, Capoeira and also
in boxing a few times. Some bullshit. (man chuckles) I’ve had some aches and
pains but really I’m surprisingly good because my
real secret is I’m a coward. And I’ve, as I said before, I’m a coward that goes into the fear. So many people might see it as brave but I go in very, very specific ways. I’m very, very careful
and I don’t take big risks and I mean that in comparison
with other practitioners that have been around me. I don’t take big risks, I never did. And that kept me safe. As for hurting the body,
that question comes from the Cartesian state of mind. This is the problem, I
don’t listen to my body. I am my body. I don’t hurt my body, I hurt myself. And I want to do with myself,
whatever the fuck I want to do with myself. And sometimes, to have this
passion is more important to me than a sore knee. And to have that connection,
I don’t look at my body from outside. This is the problem, I think,
in many, many different ways. It’s also the problem of modern medicine where we separate but actually it’s the coin. You spin it around and you
can see both side of the coin at the same time. Only when you stop, do you see one side. I never stop. I’m in motion. And hence, I always have the feeling that it’s one big entity. And I definitely
understand your orientation and seeking. I respect that pursuit especially from someone, a doctor. My sister is a doctor and she
saved many lives, I’m sure. Still to this day, continues. And now she lives here in the UK. She continues to pursue that direction, but I also believe
there is a major problem in the sense of basing your self in saving lives or in the
preservation of health. There is another problem there ’cause ultimately, that would be taken. It’s more valued by us,
but not the actual person that it happens to sometimes. There is more to it and that’s why some people
just say, sometimes, I’m out. I’m done. For us, it’s terrible. Maybe there is another way to look at it. Who knows? I never reached that place but I can see there is more there than what meets the eye. Thank you. – Thank you. One last question. Someone who really wants it. Let me see, all right. This gentlemen in the back, even waving. Can you give him the microphone. Good question. – Thanks. First with Brian, I hope you’ll
get to sleep after tonight. It was amazing, well done. – [Brian] Thank you. – Ido, I was checking out a
former conversation with Brian and you mentioned death. And you mentioned today’s
a good day to die. I’d love to hear a bit more
about your relationship to death and what are your views about
death getting in the way of people living their full lives. – I have the usual
relationship with death. Really, it’s an ambivalent relationship. There is a certain luring of the the drop, how do you say, the void. The void calls your name, right? There is something about
it, it’s constantly and then at the same times, it’s fear. Anyone here who has
fear of heights know it. Real fear of heights, I have. So when I’m in the height, my body actually throws me off. I’m attracted by the void. It doesn’t make any sense. And at the same time, I’m
terrified by the falling, by the possibility. So I think it’s extremely similar, the relationship there. It’s a big question, you
constantly redefine it in your head. I think of it daily. Death, death of close ones, my own death. And continue to work within that perspective in my own practise which means I practise the art of dying. There is no real art of living, actually. There is the art of dying,
we are all dying right now. We’re in the process of dying slowly over a period of years. Some of us have five
years, some of us have 20. Some of you maybe have a day. Maybe statistically here,
someone is going tomorrow. That’s something that we need
to, it’s the art of living, it’s the art of dying. Some things that we need to
develop a relationship with. Some cultures did that,
really pursued that. Our culture, I can say, I can call all of us,
generalisation, the culture, we have suppressed it. We have hidden it below the rugs. We don’t talk about it with our children. We don’t, you don’t
learn in school about it. You don’t receive tools
and it’s in the back of everyone’s mind, it’s the
pink elephant in the room. So this is something that I bring into the Movement practise,
into my community, into the culture. And I try to practise it myself as well. I know but at the same time, I’ve nothing simplistic to say about it, you know. I just have some practises to do. And like, slowing down your
breath to the level of a discomfort where there is panic. I need more air but actually
you don’t need more air. You can keep going like
this for a long time. And then there is working
within those parameters, you’re confronted with that
and it becomes a practise. And then you can observe. You don’t just do it once,
you do it for three years. And then you have some
observation about it. So, that’s what I can offer. – Any final thoughts? Anything you wanna say before we wrap this up.
– I said too much. (laughs) Do you enjoy things
like this or not really? – I enjoyed it a lot. I think you did an amazing job. You completely transformed the
way that you’re doing things from Dorian’s documentary. I think you’re on a different level. I have a lot of criticisms as always. (chuckles) – Which you’re going
to give to me, correct? – As always.
– Thank you. – As always, you are a
person that uses that and works with that. I think it’s a beautiful piece that, I would never be able to live
with myself on the screen, in total peace, but it’s
important that it does its job and it will serve people and help. And I want to thank you and all the crew for that amazing stuff. And most of all, thank
the people travelling from all over the world. For me, this was the real fun is to meet people, to be around
some very close people here who came, my family, to have
this opportunity to share. And this is where the real heart of it. Thank you for taking such good care of us, sending care packages and creating a social list, possibilities for us to interact. This is the most important thing. And that’s it. Big, big gratitude. – Cool, thank you. Well your family, your
family is my family. And you guys made me feel
so great in Tel Aviv. You know it was special. I don’t know if like that
was shown in the film, but you know, it’s a
special vibe in there. Everyone around you is special. You sent me a text last night, you said, good people attract good
people, something like that. – Yeah, it’s very true. – And you have some good people. Ever since the first time I
met Odelia in the Hoxton Hotel you know three years
ago, it’s just, you know, everything has been, has been that way. So yeah, thank you for lettin’ us in. Thanks for trusting me. Thanks for lettin’ us build this thing. And (cheers and applauds) we could thank Ido and them. (audience applauds) And just move. (applauds) (light music) (audience applauds) – The critics who always
speak behind my back maybe I want to hear of them, remind me. He’s back, the great pretender. I hope this time, he gets hurt. I love these guys, they give me fuel. (dramatic music) You want to reach your objective. You want to achieve it, you’re
gonna have to be obsessive. You’re gonna have to be obsessed. Feel what you do. Feel it. If you’re not feeling
it, it doesn’t matter. – It’s Chris Eubank, Jr., how do you explain his
prowess in the ring. – Junior has that obsession,
that genius, that magic. Genius is obsession, but it’s in one area. You studied the Sweet Science
for so much of your life, how do walk away from it? Do you miss it? – No. You can’t walk away from it, I am it. And even when I dance,
so really, I’m boxing. The present belongs to the man
who’s actually in the arena, whose face is mobbed by
dust and sweat and blood. The one who strive is a valiant leader. – What was the worst day of your life? And how has it shaped
you as a human being? – When I fought Nigel
Benn, I stood like this. It was to mask this. (audience laughs) (applauds) The risk must be taken. That’s why you are London Realers. That’s why we’re here. We’re tired of sitting
still, watching it happen, happening for others. Let’s do it. (dramatic instrumental downbeat) (light airy music) (audience applauds) (airy whooshing) (airy metallic whooshing)