How to Use Grains for Hearty, Healthy & Cheap Meals

How to Use Grains for Hearty, Healthy & Cheap Meals


Hey y’all! It’s a girl Hayley. I’m the
girl behind Brewing Happiness which is a health and happiness website with
recipes dedicated to all definitions of health. Today, I’ve got for you eight
really great grains and other bases for your meals that are cheap. These are the
things I keep stocked in my pantry at all times so that if I’m in a pinch I
can just cook them up really quickly, add whatever vegetables are left in my
refrigerator and I have a meal. The reason I’ve picked all of these is
because they’re good for you, they’re healthy, but they also are about three
dollars or under for a pound. You’re gonna get a lot of product for not a lot
of money – which is what we’re trying to go for. They’ll store in airtight
containers for about a year and then you have kind of a never-fail meal that you
can throw together really quickly. So most of these are grains, some of them
are not, some of them are just good basis for meals that I love. Some of these work
for breakfast and then some work for lunch, so I’ll talk through a little bit
of that. So my first one is brown rice. It’s an easy go-to, people use it a lot, you
can use it in stir fry, you can use it as a base, you could sprinkle it on salads whatever you want, brown
rice is a good go-to. It’s very cheap it’s a whole grain, it’s a good one to
keep around. My second one is barley. So barley looks a lot like rice, it’s a
whole grain as well. It’s very high in protein, it’s very high in fiber and it
cooks pretty quickly so I like barley for that. So the third one is farro. Farro
looks a lot like rice, and like barley, but it is nuttier in flavor. It’s really
delicious. It’s one of my favorite grains to keep around. It’s also very cheap too
whole-grain. Farro and barley are both really good you know for soups things
like that as well as being the base of different meals.
Up next is oats. Oats are a great whole grain to keep around. They’re great for
breakfast, but you could also make some savory oats that’s a really good thing
to do. You can throw them in baking, you can make oat flour out of them. They make a nice solid base to your meal, almost anytime. Next up is millet. Millet is also
a whole grain. Millet gets sort of a bad rap because it is a little bit
temperamental to make but it’s delicious and super cheap. It’s maybe the cheapest of the grains. Millet you can make very
creamy and sort of grits-like or you can make it a little bit fluffier kind of
like quinoa. Then there is buckwheat. Buckwheat is actually not a grain it is
a seed and it is gluten-free, despite the name: buck-wheat. It comes in small little seeds called buckwheat groats or it comes in
flower form. I always suggest keeping some buckwheat groats around. You can use them sort of like a quinoa or you could soak them and make them a little bit
like an overnight oats situation. Next up we have couscous which couscous is not
gluten-free it is sort of like a pasta it’s flour and water mixed up into small
little grains. What I love about couscous is that it is so quick to make. With
couscous, you simply can kind of just pour hot water and equal proportions
over it cover it and almost within five minutes
you have a base to a meal. Finally, there are lentils. Lentils are not a grain.
They’re actually a pulse so it doesn’t exactly fit in this category; however,
lentils are super high in protein, they’re very cheap. Lentils make a really
hearty base for a meal. So that’s it! I’ve provided some recipe ideas for you in
the article below. If you don’t know how to use any of these grains, don’t worry.
They’re great to just keep around in your pantry, your life will be easier and
cheaper, and healthier. So I will be back in a few weeks to give you more tips and
tricks on eating healthy on a budget. Until then, follow me @brewinghappiness and I will see you guys next time! Bye!