How to Prune Organic, Bare Root Fruit Trees

How to Prune Organic, Bare Root Fruit Trees


Welcome! I’m Tricia, a California organic gardener, and it’s wintertime – that means it’s time to prune the fruit trees. Except, a word of caution: don’t prune your cherry trees and if you
live in Northern California, don’t prune your apricots, those should wait till the summer
when they’re less susceptible to disease. The goal of pruning is to have a mature
tree that’s easy to harvest a little bit low growing and very productive. Today
I’m going to prune my brand new peach tree. The structure of the tree is very important. You want a low, strong structure, one that’s conducive to good fruit
production and easy harvest. Just picture a wine glass, a red wine
glass, or a tulip you want the tree to grow out. Llook for branches that cross over each other like this one, or branches that grow into the tree those are the branches that we are going to be pruning. We’re going to talk about two types of
cuts. The first one is a heading cut. A heading cut is where we cut above an outward facing bud.
The outward facing bud is going to be the outward facing branch which is going to create
that red wine affect for us, if we cut above an inward facing bud we’re going
to have a branch that grows back into the tree we don’t want that. So the kind of cut I’m going to use is a thinning cut and the second type of cut that we’re going to demonstrate notice the collar that goes around the branch that’s attached to the trunk. You want
to make your cut as close to the collar as possible without
cutting into the collar. You also don’t want to cut too far out because then you’ll leave a stub. Because this is a newly planted tree
and i want to really control the structure and the growth I’m going to cut the trunk off and I’m going to cut it off anywhere
between my knees and my waist. I just want to make sure that we have at least three
to five good strong lateral branches coming out
below the cut. So I know it seems scary but you just have
to go for it So now we can select which branches
to keep and which branches to cut and the important thing to consider is the angle
of the branch off the tree you want to keep branches that are about
forty five degrees from the trunk and you don’t want to keep branches that are
less than forty five degrees or maybe even a little bit more than forty five
degrees. Well, I’ve made a decision on what branches I
want to keep and what branches I want to cut based on having a nice balance on
the tree. I’m gonna put a ribbon around the branches I’m going to keep and I’m going to cut the rest. I’ve labeled the branches that I’m going to
keep and I’m going to cut the branches that i don’t want to keep and my newly pruned peach tree! I hope that was helpful! Next time we are going to be talking about natural dormant spraying so until then Grow Organic for Life!