How to Improve Histamine Intolerance

How to Improve Histamine Intolerance


Ready to leave your histamine symptoms behind? Keep watching to find out how to feel better. If you’re new here, hi there, welcome. My name is Amanda Malachesky. I’m a Functional Nutrition Health Coach and
a Digestive and Allergy Detective. For the best tips and tricks on how to navigate
your digestive and allergy challenges, be sure to subscribe and click the bell to be
notified when I post a new video for you every week. Today’s video is for you if you experience
histamine symptoms either from foods or from environmental factors, and this can include
symptoms like headaches, frequent diarrhea, rashes on your skin, or a brain fog like feeling,
and including shortness of breath. So if you have experienced any of these symptoms
regularly from food or other factors, then you want to keep watching. In today’s video, I’m going to share how you
can reduce your histamine related symptoms using a diet and lifestyle approach. By using the steps in this video, my client
Steve got clear on his histamine triggers and was able to reduce his reactivity and
get to feeling a lot better, and I know that you can too, so let’s get started. So before we get to talking about the tips,
I want to talk really briefly about what causes histamine intolerance. Histamine intolerance can develop in lots
of different ways, but ultimately because histamine is broken down in the gut, it often
points to some kind of problem in the GI tract, whether that’s caused by infections, or toxins,
or side effects from medications, or other reasons. Some common causes of a histamine problem
are overconsumption of histamine containing foods, SIBO or bacterial overgrowth, candida
or yeast overgrowth, insufficient levels of an enzyme called DAO, which helps break down
the histamine, or certain genetic polymorphisms which can affect the metabolism of histamine. Another common cause I’ve seen is caused by
people eating really restrictive diets, things like the autoimmune paleo diet and the keto
diet. And I think that what’s going on here is this
radical change in composition of the diet really has an impact on the population of
bacteria and other players in the GI tract, and this change can promote a shift to more
varieties of bacteria that release histamine. Once this happens, you would be more susceptible
to your histamine bucket overflowing. So what do we do? As I like to say, I want to encourage us to
think about this in a methodical way and choose an approach that’s holistic and makes a lot
of sense. I discuss this method fully in my free guide
called The Roadmap to Gut Recovery. I’ll be sure and leave a link for that below
this video. You can go download it when you have a moment. So first we want to assess why you’re having
this problem. So is it about nutrient deficiencies? Is it about an infection in your gut? Is it about what you’re eating? Is it a combination of all of these things? So we really want to do a thorough assessment
and case review to understand all of the contributing factors to create an appropriate plan. So one thing that this might include is doing
some GI testing and also some standard blood serum labs that can help us evaluate some
of the nutrient deficiencies that might be involved, and also to look for infections. So for more information about GI testing,
you could check out my earlier video called Gut Microbiome Testing For IBS. I go into the different tests that we use
in the functional space to evaluate what’s happening in the gut. The next step you’ll want to take to reduce
your histamine symptoms is to start working with foods and reducing high histamine foods. You can access a high histamine food list
by going to confluencenutrition.com/histamine. I’ll leave that link below this video, so
you can go grab that after you’ve finished watching. And I made an earlier video about this topic
as well that you could go check out. It’s called Histamine Intolerance For IBS,
and in that video I talk about how to use the histamine food list properly to get the
most mileage out of it. So the point of this step is to remove the
most likely culprits, not to remove all histamine foods, because you may not react to all of
them. Everybody’s a little different. Once you get clear on which foods are triggering
your symptoms, you can experiment with your threshold levels for that food. So, for example, you might be able to eat
a little portion of salami, but if you eat seven pieces, you have a reaction. A really important thing to eliminate during
this phase is alcohol. And this is because alcohol not only contains
a high level of histamine, it also derails the function of the DAO enzyme that I mentioned
that helps break down histamine, so it’s a little bit of a double whammy. A few more tips to know about histamine and
food. One is that cooking method does not affect
the level of histamine in your food, so you can’t boil or fry or saute away your histamine
problem. And the other thing to know about food and
histamine is that leftovers accumulate histamine. The longer they’re stored, the higher the
histamine level. And this especially applies to animal protein
foods. So if you want to use leftovers, which I think
is great to cut down on cooking, you’ll want to freeze portions of the food for use later,
and that halts the histamine production process. Next, you’ll want to make sure that if you’re
using probiotics, that you’re using probiotic strains that are not histamine producers. A lot of the really common strains of probiotics
that are out there on the market are histamine producers. So I’m going to include a link below this
video to a blog post I found a while back that details which probiotic strains are histamine
producers, and which ones are histamine degraders, or are beneficial for a histamine situation. So go ahead and check that out. Next you’ll want to incorporate any relief
care methods and address any nutrient deficiencies that are contributing to your inability to
break down histamine. If you’re not sure which nutrients you need
in this case, you may want to work with a practitioner who can help you sort this out. The first thing to make sure you have adequate
levels of is vitamin C and copper, and this is because your body’s ability to create DAO
enzyme is dependent on these two nutrients. The second thing to include are nutrients
that support methylation or cellular level detox, and the most common deficiencies of
these nutrients are vitamin B12, vitamin B9, also known as folate, vitamin B6 and magnesium. And this is because these nutrients help your
body form an enzyme called HNMT which is part of the methylation cycle, and HNMT also helps
break down histamine. Number three is to use natural antihistamines
such as vitamin C, quercetin, or stinging nettle capsules or tincture. All of these nutrients and herbs are antihistamines
and work really well to help control histamine symptoms. They aren’t a substitute for dealing with
the deeper layer factors, but in a pinch they can really help you feel better right away. And finally, number four is to use DAO enzyme
itself. There are several products out there on the
market that you can get that you can take with your meals to help reduce the histamine
effect. Next, you want to address any dysbiosis that
you found on the GI testing that you’ve done, because often this is where the problem really
truly originates, and once you start to address this layer, this is where the real results
often come in. This is a huge topic, and there’s a lot more
here to handle than I could possibly talk about in this video, so if this is you, I
really encourage you to work with a practitioner who can help you work through this process
safely. In the meantime, you can check out my earlier
video called Dysbiosis Treatment Tips that will give you some idea of the order of operations
and some of the things you might be looking at working with. I’m curious to hear from you which of these
tips you think might be most valuable or useful for you and your histamine problem. Leave me a comment below this video and let
me know what you think. I hope that these tips have given you some
concrete action steps to work with on improving your histamine symptoms and that you’ll be
feeling better in no time. I really encourage you to try some of these
things and see what kinds of results you can get, and get back to me. Let me know if they work. In the meantime, this process that I’ve talked
about today is kind of a snapshot of my big picture strategy that I use with all of my
clients to help resolve their GI troubles and distress, so I really want to invite you
to download a free copy of my guide called Roadmap to Gut Recovery. It’s an action guide that details steps that
you can take right now to get started working on your digestive challenges. You can download your free copy by visiting
confluencenutrition.com/roadmap. I’ll be sure to leave a link for that below
this video. If you’ve already tried all these steps and
you’re still not getting anywhere, I really encourage you to schedule some time to meet
with me. I can help you troubleshoot your situation
and get you moving in the right direction, and this is especially true if you’re not
sure about the nutrient deficiencies that you might need to address, or if you’re not
sure about GI testing, I can help you with that. You can always schedule a free 30 minute assessment
session with me by visiting confluencenutrition.com/contact. When we get together, we’ll be sure to talk
about what’s most pressing for you right now, what your next steps might be, and we can
talk about what it would be like to work together if that seems like the right thing. Until then, best of luck reducing your histamine
symptoms. I’ll be taking a two week break during my
kid’s school holiday, so there won’t be any new videos until early January, but I will
look forward to seeing you all then. Happy Holidays.