How to Grow Fruit & Vegetables in Hanging Baskets

How to Grow Fruit & Vegetables in Hanging Baskets


[Music] Hello there! Not everyone has the space for a full-blown vegetable garden, but even a few pots clustered on the patio can make a meaningful contribution to the kitchen. And then there’s this – the humble hanging basket. In this video we’ll look at which fruits and vegetables to grow in a hanging basket, the best way to plant one up, and of course how to look after it so you can be guaranteed something extra tasty for your efforts! Hanging baskets offer an excellent way to pack more produce into a smaller space. Suspended from rafters, walls, or framing the front door, they provide ample opportunity to make the very best of the space you have. You can grow a surprising variety of crops in hanging baskets. Cherry tomatoes and strawberries work really well, while growing salad leaves in this way lifts them up out of the reach of hungry slugs. Chili peppers, leafy herbs, spinach, bush (or dwarf) beans – even cucumbers are suitable candidates for basket growing and can make for a highly attractive display. And of course don’t forget a basket – or two – packed with flowering annuals to pull in the pollinators. Just stunning! With our Garden Planner, it’s easy to add hanging baskets to your garden plan. Simply select a basket, place it where you want it, then adjust the dimensions using the corner handles. Once you’re done, change the selection bar to show All Plants then scroll through until you find what you want to grow. Select it and drop it into position in your basket. You can of course add multiple hanging baskets to your vegetable garden. Let’s go ahead and plant up a hanging basket. Hanging baskets can dry out quicker than other containers because they’re often more exposed to the wind and sun, so we’ll start by selecting a basket that’s at least 14in (35cm) in diameter. This will hold at least a gallon of potting soil, which means it will be slower to dry out. It will be very heavy so make sure that your hanging basket’s chains, and the support you’re hanging it from, is strong enough. This wire basket needs a liner. Place the basket onto a bucket to stop it rocking about. We’re using an old potting soil bag as our liner – it’s free and very easy to use. Open the bag out, then cut it to size, erring on the generous size just in case. Line the basket so that the black surface is facing out, then pierce some holes into the liner for drainage. Don’t pierce the bottom of the liner – it will collect water, effectively acting as a handy reservoir. Alternatively, you could place a pot saucer into the bottom. Now for the potting soil. Use a quality multi-purpose potting soil mixed with a handful of slow-release fertilizer. You could also mix in a couple of handfuls of well-rotted leafmold to improve water retention. Begin filling your basket with the potting soil mix. We’re going to plant some strawberries into this basket. A basket this size will hold 3 plants. Alternatively you could plant 2 cherry tomatoes plus French marigolds or basil as companion plants, or 2-3 peppers, or up to 5 leafy herbs. Or sow cut-and-come-again salad leaves over the surface like this, then cover with a thin layer of potting soil. They will grow on to give a luscious edible display . Remove the plants from their pots. gently tease apart the outside roots, then space them out equally in the basket. Fill in around the roots with more potting soil, firming it in with your fingertips as you go. The final level of the potting soil should be 1in (2-3cm) below the rim of the basket. Trim off any excess liner then hang the basket up and give it a thorough water. Most crops, including these strawberries, will prefer a sunny position while leafy salads and herbs will be fine in a part-shaded location. Hanging baskets are completely reliant on you for enough moisture, so water your baskets as soon as they start to dry out. This may be as frequently as twice a day in hot weather. When the slow-release fertilizer is exhausted begin watering on a liquid feed once a week. These strawberries will be fine with a tomato fertilizer which should encourage more flowers and fruits. You could make your own feed by steeping comfrey leaves in water to make a comfrey tea. Pick your produce regularly. For fruiting plants such as tomatoes this stimulates more fruits, while leafy salads and herbs such as basil and mint will respond by growing lots more leaves. Hanging baskets are a fantastic addition to the garden and help to bring the fruits, vegetables and herbs you grow in them up off the ground to eye level where you can really marvel at their abundance Have you grown crops in hanging baskets before? If you have, let us know what you grew, and of course share any clever tips you might have by just dropping us a comment below. We’ll be checking in on these strawberry plants in a future video, so to find out how they get on make sure you’re subscribed. I’ll catch you next time. [Music]