Growing, Harvesting and Eating Maypop (Hardy Passion Fruit)

Growing, Harvesting and Eating Maypop (Hardy Passion Fruit)


Hi gardeners, this is North Tropics here and
I today I want to talk about the Maypop or passiflora incarnata. It’s sometimes called the true passionflower,
or the hardy passion fruit. It’s easy to grow, has delicious fruits and
as you can see, has beautiful flowers that bees love. One way to start growing the maypop is from
seed and you can see, here are some seeds I saved from a previous fruit that I’ve harvested. These seeds are easy to start and you can
plant them much like any other seed. I plant mine in a small pot in standard potting
soil. I put about three seeds in this small pot,
poked them a bit into the soil and covered with some more potting mix on top. After watering deeply it’s ready to be placed
into a bag to keep up the humidity. The other way to start maypops is from a division
or runner. If you’ve ever grown mint, you’ll know what
I’m talking about. Maypops send out tons of small plants that
you can use to replant Or you can share them. These little plants can be several feet away
from the main plant so be careful where you put them. After getting the runner dug up use a bamboo
stake to dig a hole into some more potting soil. Once the hole is deep enough I can stick the
plant down in it, pack some more soil around it. And top off with some extra mix. They are not picky with what type of soil
they grow in but here I am using a mix of peat, peralite and native top soil. Next I make sure to water it deeply and keep
it out of direct sunlight until it starts showing some new growth. Soon after your plant is established it will
start producing these flowers that look great to us and to the bees. They smell very sweet too. To help them produce more fruit you should
have more than one plant planted in the same yard. It can be a different passiflora species or
even another Maypop, as long as they were both started from seed so they have a bit
of genetic diversity. Lots of the flowers may not get pollinated
and just fall off. If they do get pollinated You can see the
small fruit starting to form from the middle of the flower. He is the last one I started from seed. And as you can see they can even produce some
fruits in this small of a pot as long as they get enough sunshine and water. This is my main plant growing in the ground
that I started from seed in late winter of 2015. This is a small fruit that unfortunately something
else ate. These two fruits from that same plant are
almost ready but it’s pretty easy to tell when they are. If the fruits are still on the plant, they’re
not ripe. Once fully ripe they will fall to the ground. I was checking this one every day and finally
it fell from the vine. I made sure to get it quick so nothing else
would. Here you can see that they get really wrinkly
and soft when fully ripe. Maypops do not turn a dark brown like other
passion fruits do but instead they stay green or start take on an almost yellow color. There are many ways to eat the maypop. After cutting in half you can scoop out the
inside with a spoon or just squeeze it out with your fingers. The fruit is full of crunchy edible seeds
and slimy pulp. The texture some people might not like but
I really enjoy it. It has a really sweet tropical flavor unlike
anything else. You can also use them to make deserts, drinks
or other dishes and I’ll be doing a video on that when I get some more ripe fruit. You can also save some of the seeds to plant
or share but wait until they dry to remove the rest of the fruit because they are so
slimy. This plant is my passiflora edulis. Also known as the lilikoi or purple passion
fruit. It is said to be a better tasting variety
and it is the common commercial type sold in some stores. This plant is not as hardy and can’t take
the cold. I only got this a couple weeks ago but it’s
all ready doubled in size so I hope to do a video on it next. So have you ever ate or grown a maypop? Do you grow other types of passion fruits? Please let me know in the comments. Thanks so much for watching and if you’d like
to follow me on my journey of growing tropical fruits in a cold climate, please subscribe.