Fruit For Diabetes — Is It Actually Safe to Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes — Is It Actually Safe to Eat?


Cyrus: Now the rice fruit diet was dr. Kempner’s attempt to create a no salt, no
cholesterol diet. It’s practically pure carbohydrates. And what he found was that by feeding his
patients this diet, he could reverse four conditions: (1) malignant
hypertension, which was thought to be incurable at the time, (2) heart disease, (3) diabetic
retinopathy, (4) kidney disease. Now let’s think about
this for a second because it doesn’t fully make sense. Conventional diabetes wisdom tells you
that eating foods high in carbohydrate will exacerbate diabetes altogether. They will increase
your blood glucose, they will increase your insulin requirements, and will increase your
oral medication requirements. If this was true, then Dr. Kempner’s rice
fruit diet would have resulted in a metabolic disaster for his patients. But why didn’t that happen? It didn’t happen for one
simple reason: because carbohydrates are not the enemy. Fruits are not the enemy. Never
have been; never will be. Let’s face it. Practically everywhere you look on the internet
for information about diabetes nutrition, you’ll see the same message that
says don’t eat fruit. And the reason for this is simple:
They say fruit equals sugar. Sugar’s bad for you. Therefore for is also bad for you. Most of the
people in this anti-fruit world will tell you that there’s only really a couple of fruits
that you can eat, and most of them are berries because
they’re high in antioxidants and they’re low glycemic. Then you have people like us and others in
the plant-based community who tell you the exact
opposite. We tell you that eating fruit is good for
you, especially if you’re living with diabetes. How can this possibly be true? How can there be two completely opposite sides
saying the exact opposite message? In today’s video we’re going to go into the
actual science of fruit to give you an idea of exactly how beneficial
it can be for your overall health living with diabetes. A study published in PLOS Medicine studied
over 500,000 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 over the course of 7
years in order to determine the effect of their diet on
overall health. We love these types of studies because they’re
performed in large numbers of people over long periods of time. For those who are living with diabetes at
the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week
had a 17% reduced risk for all-cause mortality, which is death from any cause as compared
with their diabetic counterparts who were eating 0
pieces of fruit over the course of a week. They also found that diabetic individuals
who ate fruit 3 times per week had 13 – 28% reduced risk for
macrovascular complications including heart disease and stroke, as well as microvascular
complications including kidney disease, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Now refined sugars, found in packaged and
processed foods, increase your risk for chronic disease.such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer,
obesity, and metabolic syndrome. But sugars
found in fruit — long-chain carbohydrates and short chain carbohydrates — come prepackaged
with behind-the-scenes players otherwise known as WAVFM: water, antioxidants, vitamins,
fiber, and minerals. It’s these behind-the-scenes nutrients that
conduct a very complicated orchestra of biochemistry in your small intestine
and in your large intestine that actually confer a
number of health benefits. And these nutrients in combination with carbohydrate,
fat, and protein that you get from the fruit improve
your overall health, reduce your risk for chronic
disease, and improve your insulin sensitivity. There’s no question that both refined sugar
as well as whole sugar will increase your blood
glucose values. Nobody’s going to refute that. The difference though is that refined sugars
will spike your blood glucose faster and to a higher
degree than whole sugars that come from fruits. You may be asking yourself a simple question:
How much fruit is too much? If you accept the
premise that fruit is actually good for you, then the next question becomes “Well, how
many pieces per day are acceptable? Should we limit our fruit intake to just a
few pieces of fruit per day, or is there actually an upper limit on
the amount you can eat?” In 2001, researchers tested the effect of
20 fruits per day on blood lipids and colon function, and
found that within the first 2 weeks, total cholesterol had dropped by about 40 mg/dL
and LDL cholesterol also dropped by 38 mg/dL. As early as the 1930’s, Dr. Rabinowitch and
his colleagues at Montreal General Hospital discovered that diets high in fat have detrimental
effects on insulin sensitivity and that diets low
in fat improve insulin sensitivity. They performed what’s called a randomized
control trial in patients with type 2 diabetes — the gold
standard in nutritional research — and found that a high
carbohydrate diet significantly reduced insulin needs very quickly. Approximately 20 years later in the 1950s,
Dr. Walter Kempner from Duke University demonstrated that high fat diets not only
caused insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, but that
patients could begin reversing longstanding complications of diabetes including diabetic
retinopathy in a matter of days simply by eating a diet that was very high in fruit. Dr. Kempner
invented what’s called the rice fruit diet in which his patients were allowed to eat
white rice, fruit, fruit juice, and believe it or not — added
sugar — four foods that present-day diabetes nutrition
practically condemns entirely. Now the rice fruit diet was dr. Kempner’s attempt to create a no salt, no
cholesterol diet. It’s
practically pure carbohydrates. And what he found was that by feeding his
patients this diet, he could reverse four conditions: (1) malignant
hypertension, which was thought to be incurable at
the time, (2) heart disease, (3) diabetic retinopathy, (4) kidney disease. Now let’s think about
this for a second because it doesn’t fully make sense. Conventional diabetes wisdom tells you
that eating foods high in carbohydrate will exacerbate diabetes altogether. They will increase
your blood glucose, they will increase your insulin requirements, and will increase your
oral medication requirements. If this was true, then Dr. Kempner’s rice
fruit diet would have resulted in a metabolic disaster for his patients. But why didn’t that happen? It didn’t happen for one
simple reason: because carbohydrates are not the enemy. Fruits are not the enemy. Never
have been; never will be. Diets that are high in carbohydrate, as long
as they are low in fat (and that’s the most important part), lead to significant
metabolic improvements not only in controlling blood glucose and minimizing your need for
insulin, but also in minimizing the complications of
diabetes as was stated earlier. Now in 1979, Dr. James W. Anderson and Kylie
Ward published another study in which they took patients living with type 2 diabetes
who had been living with the condition for more than 20
years. What they did was they transferred them from
a conventional diabetes diet to a diet that was low in fat and high in carbohydrate, but
they made sure that they did not lose a single pound. What they were trying to determine was whether
the diet itself was influencing their insulin sensitivity independent of any weight
loss, In order to do this, they practically force-fed
their patients, making sure that they were eating so much food that they could not lose
a single pound. The results of the study were nothing short
of remarkable. Insulin requirements
plummeted by an average of 58% in the group that ate a low-fat diet, whereas insulin
requirements did not change in those eating the conventional diabetes diet. Ten out of the 20
subjects were able to discontinue insulin altogether. And those who continued using insulin
were able to reduce their dosages between 7 – 98%. The most surprising result was that more
than 50% of subjects were able to discontinue insulin completely after only 16 days on a
low-fat diet, having lived with type 2 diabetes for
many years. Now the next time somebody tells you not to
eat fruit when you’re living with diabetes because
it’s too high in sugar, tell them four things: (1) Carbohydrates are not the enemy. They never
have been the enemy and they never will be the enemy. (2) According to the evidence-based
research, people who eat the most fruit have the lowest risk for diabetes and they have
the best short-term and long-term health outcomes. (3) According to the evidence-based research
once again, there is no upper limit on the amount
of fruit that you can eat. (4) If you want to improve
your insulin sensitivity and significantly drop your risk for developing diabetes or
drop your medication requirements living with diabetes,
simply drop your fat intake and increase your carbohydrate intake and watch as the magic
unfolds. Now if you enjoyed watching this video, be
sure to like this video. Be sure to leave a comment
below about your thoughts on fruit intake. And be sue to follow Mastering Diabetes YouTube
channel. I look forward to seeing you in the next video.