Five Rules for a Healthy Diet | Chris Masterjohn Lite #72

Five Rules for a Healthy Diet | Chris Masterjohn Lite #72


Here are five rules to a healthy diet. Hi. I’m Dr. Chris Masterjohn of chrismasterjohnphd.com. And this is Chris Masterjohn Lite, where the name of the game is “Details? Shmeetails. Just tell me what works!” And today we’re going to boil down a healthy diet to five simple rules. Rule #1: Protein. Get a half gram to a gram of protein per pound of bodyweight, or if you’re trying to gain muscle or lose fat, per pound of target bodyweight, or if you measure your weight in kilograms, double that amount. And this is the important point. Diversify among meat, fish, shellfish, and other invertebrates, such as insects if you eat them, eggs, and dairy products. The reason for the diversification is that each of these different types of foods within the larger group of protein foods has a different composition of vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids, so you want to diversify to get all the different benefits from the different foods, and because every food has something in it that can be harmful if consumed to excess, and you want to avoid the potential accumulation of any of those harmful things. Some people for specific athletic or body composition goals may need to eat even more protein than that, but a half gram to a gram per pound of bodyweight is sufficient for most people to be healthy in my opinion. Rule #2: Eat nose-to-tail. In other words, try to consume the parts of the animal, when you eat animals, that we don’t consume anymore but our ancestors always consumed. A good way to start is to try eating liver once or twice a week and to try working in bones into your diet whether through the edible bones found in canned fish or the small—you can gnaw off the ends of chicken bones, for example, when they’re small. Or if you want something a little bit more culinarily acceptable, bones are great to boil down into stock that can be used for gravies and broths. There are lots of other ways to work in eating nose-to-tail. There are plenty of other organ meats, for example, that you can start working in, but liver is the most important thing to try to get in there once a week for the nutritional benefits. Rule #3: Get 1,000 milligrams of calcium or up to 1.5 grams of calcium per day. The easiest way to do this is to get three servings of dairy products or three servings of edible bones. Bone broth is not included because the liquids derived from bones are not very rich in calcium. Edible bones or dairy products or mixed and matched between those two for three servings a day. If you’re not consuming either of those two foods, you probably need to pay closer attention to your calcium, and there’s probably a good likelihood that you should take a calcium supplement. Rule #4: Diversify your carbohydrates among whole grains, legumes, starchy tubers, and fruits. If you’re going to cut one of those out, you can cut out whole grains. Try to get the others. But if you don’t have a specific reason to avoid grains, then whole grains can be a healthy part of your carbohydrate supply. The reason for diversification in the carbohydrates is exactly the same as we talked about with the meats. Rule #5: Eat a large volume, meaning several cups a day, of vegetables. Diversify across the color spectrum. Make sure at least one of those cups of vegetables is dark green. Again, diversifying for the same reasons we talked about before, spread out the different types of benefits, avoid too much risk in any given one type of food. These are the five rules. I’ll add a bonus rule. Always include digestive aids in your meals. This could be things like including ginger, or Swedish bitters, or fermented foods as long as you tolerate them, lacto-fermented foods, like sauerkraut and kimchi, small amounts of kombucha, different foods like this, maybe if you need them, digestive enzyme supplements, can all be important to making sure that you get the nutrients out of your foods because your diet is only as good as your digestion of that diet. You can get all the nutrients in the world into your stomach, but if you’re not pulling them out and assimilating them into your body, it doesn’t do you any good. These are rules for people who don’t have food allergies and food intolerances that prevent them from consuming some of the specific foods or some of the food groups in this list. You may be someone who needs to avoid some of the foods that I talked about, and that’s okay, but the more foods you avoid, the more you need to pay attention to your diet to make sure you’re managing it properly. The broader spectrum of foods within what I discussed here today that you can consume, the more likely you are to get everything you need without having to micromanage your diet. This episode is brought to you by Ancestral Supplements. Our Native American ancestors believed that eating the organs from a healthy animal would support the health of the corresponding organ of the individual. Ancestral Supplements is a nose-to-tail product line of grass-fed liver, organs, bone marrow, and more. All in the convenience of a capsule. For more information or to buy any of their products, go to ancestralsupplements.com. This episode is brought to you by Testing Nutritional Status: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet. Everything you could ever need to know to optimize your nutrition all in one place. Easier to find and use than ever before. Get your copy at chrismasterjohnphd.com/cheatsheet. Use the code LITE5, that’s all capitals L I T E and the number 5. LITE5 to to get five dollars off. The audio of this episode was enhanced and post-processed by Bob Davodian of Taurean Mixing. You can find more of his work at taureanonlinemixing.com. All right, I hope you found this useful. Signing off, this is Chris Masterjohn of of chrismasterjohnphd.com. This has been Chris Masterjohn Lite, and I will see you in the next episode.