“Exercise with a Difference” by Barbara O’Neill (8/10)

“Exercise with a Difference” by Barbara O’Neill (8/10)


– Thank you, welcome back, where we talk about exercise. God designed this living machinery to be in daily activity, and in that activity is
its preserving power. So what’s a preservative? Something that stops you going bad or off. And I find that when I meet people in their latter years of life who are in good working order, it’s because they’re active. And you might have heard of the Blue Zone. National Geographic
looked at groups of people who commonly live ’til a very long life. In fact, they even eventually wrote a book called The Blue Zone, and the three main people
that they looked at was the Okinowans, which
is a Japanese group. I think it’s an island, and they commonly live ’til
they’re into their 100s. But it’s not just long life, it’s quality of life. These people are still active, even when they’re 100. They also looked at the Sardinians, which is an Italian group, and they also live long lives and quality of lives. But also, in Loma Linda University, they looked at a group
of Seventh-day Adventists who also live long lives
and quality of life. Now there were three common denominators with these three groups of people. One was they’re very social. Another was that they ate
food in its natural state. Some of them eat meat,
but if they do eat meat, it’s a very small part of the diet, and it’s usually healthy meat, meat in a natural environment. But the third common denominator was they’re very active. In fact, the journalist
was trying to keep up with one Sardinian man who was
climbing up this big mountain to check his goats, and
this guy was about 90, and the journalist could
hardly keep up with him. So, always active. The body must move. Strength comes by exercise. There’s no other way. And stagnant pools breed disease, stagnant bodies breed disease. You gotta move. Now there is a type of exercise that the exercise physiologists today are claiming is the most
powerful form of exercise. It’s the high intensity interval training. So, as the name implies, this high intensity interval training, intervals of high intensity. So let’s define high intensity. So high intensity is anything that gets the heart rate up
and get you breathing deeply. So, my husband and I, we
live in a fairly hilly area. We’re up in the mountains, so in our morning
exercise, we run up hills. Now not everyone can run. So, if you can’t run,
try an exercise bike. In fact, most of the
research that’s been done on the high intensity interval training has been done on an exercise bike, because you’re holding on, especially if you’re a little unstable, and you can go really, really fast, and then recovery time
is going a little slower. In fact, recovery time is
usually going a lot slower. So, high intensity is running as hard, or cycling as hard, as fast, or swimming, or pushups, or if you have those little trampolines, jumping really high or
jogging on the rebounder. It’s gotta be high intensity, and the research is showing
that 30 seconds high intensity is a good amount. Now, you might think 30
seconds isn’t very long. Try it. (audience tittering) Try running as hard as you
can up a hill for 30 seconds. Now when I first read of this, I was so impressed I started to try it. When I get to 20 seconds,
my body says, “That’ll do.” When I get to 25 seconds, my body says, “This is ridiculous.” When I get to 30 seconds,
I feel like I’m dying. (heavy panting) That’s what you gotta get to. This is no gentle stroll. It’s like anything in life, the more you put into it, the
more you will get out of it. Well, what’s recovery time? The research is showing
that the best recovery time is not just standing still, but it’s actually moving a bit. Often with recovery, I’m
just doing some stretches, maybe stretching legs. I haven’t got the skirt on today that allows me to squat or
do the good leg stretches. I don’t wear this skirt
on my morning walk. Very important that you
have comfortable clothes, and very, very warm clothes, but not too warm because
you’re gonna get warm. Someone said to me when I
ask them if they exercise, they said, “Oh, it got too cold.” I said, “Nah, it’s the best time.” Because your body is
gonna get very, very warm. In fact, the best way to warm
the body is move the body. That’s the way God meant
for our bodies to get warm is to move. I’ve got a friend, his
name’s Dr. Jonathan Gibbs. He’s got three PhDs. He lives in Los Angeles. And one of his PhDs was the
effect of exercise on the cell. And he told me that when you
get to your high intensity, to that 30 seconds, he said, a network of
capillaries is opened in the body that equals the distance around planet Earth. Ha. I can hardly get my mind around that one. That’s quite incredible. I used to suffer from
cold feet, all the time. In fact, often I’d be
sitting in my little en suite with my feet in the hot water
to just try and warm them up. I don’t get cold feet anymore. It’s because of exactly
what Jonathan Gibbs said. Because it opens a network of capillaries way out
to your extremities. One lady said to me, “My little girl complains, “’cause every morning I’m dressing her “and my hands are cold.” She came to Misty Mountain, she heard about the
high intensity exercise, she emailed me six weeks later, she said, “My little girls are very happy, “because my hands aren’t cold anymore.” Because she’s exercising. You see cold hands and cold
feet are like naughty children. Don’t let them be. Don’t let them be. Don’t let them get cold. In bed, we’re always warm, is that right? Well when you get out of bed, you’re gonna get cold unless you put some warm clothes on yeah? So in the winter, my feet
never touch the ground, ’cause if I get out of bed and put my feet on the ground, what’s gonna happen to my feet? They’re gonna get cold. You gotta go to great lengths
to keep your body warm because perfect health
requires perfect circulation. Your feet and your hands
should always be as warm as the middle of your body. Now I’m only slight, so I get cold very quickly. So I go to great lengths
to put warm clothes on. I’ve got woolen stockings on, I’ve got a woolen skirt on, I’ve got a cashmere jumper and another cashmere jumper. I go to great lengths to keep warm because I know that the health of my body is partly dependent on me
ensuring proper circulation which means my whole body is warm. Any part of your body that gets cold, the blood’s not going down there. You see, we’re warm blooded creatures. And it’s the blood that’s the warmth. And if my hands were cold, they’d be really white. And if they get cold,
and I rub them together, and hit them together like this, they’ll start to get warm and they’ll become pink. What’s warmed my hands? The blood. I’ve just drawn the blood into that area. And last night when we
looked at the immune system, we looked at a little bit
more detail in the blood, the most powerful way to
move the blood is exercise. That’s what exercise does, especially this high intensity. So, recovery time. Recovery time takes
usually about 90 seconds. That’s if you’re quite fit. If you’re not fit, your recovery time might
be a little bit longer. Dr. Al Sears in his book, PACE, he’s known as the exercise doctor. He gives a story of a lady who did seven seconds high intensity and she needed 15
minutes to recover, phew. Now she won’t need 15
minutes the next day. Maybe the next day it’ll be 12 minutes. And if she continues this every day, her recovery time will get less and less. Your fitness is not determined by how hard and fast you run, or cycle, or swim or
whatever works for you. But by how long you take to recover. So note your recovery time. So the book, PACE, the
first word is progressive. This is progressive. The more you do it, the stronger you get, and the less recovery time you will need. So that’s quite exciting. And age has got nothing to do with this. Did everyone get that? Age has got nothing to do with this. Because muscle knows no age. So whether you’re nine or 90, you can have strong muscles. I fly a lot. Last time I was on the plane to America, I went into documentaries and I found a documentary
of 90 year old athletes. 90 year old athletes. Wow, you should have seen
these guys, and some ladies. They’re fit. This high intensity interval training is usually done for a cycle of six. So what does that come to, what’s that, 12, 13 minutes? That’s not long is it? It’s actually not long at all. Michael and I used to do a
half hour walk every day. Two kilometers. We don’t anymore. It’s come down really, really
short, which I’m so glad because I got a lot of
stuff to do in the day. So I do the high intensity
interval training, I only have to leave
myself 15 minutes, I run. Now let me just comment
on running for a minute. It’s very important when you run to not run on the cement or the tar. You gotta run on the earth, because that will give you a bit of give. And if you notice how children run, they always run on their toes. You see, our feet have been designed for us to run on our toes, but some jogger brands, in fact most of them, have you noticed what they’ve done? They’ve padded the heel to
encourage heel striking. There’s a book called Born To
Run by Christopher McDougall and he was a runner, used to get lower back problems
a lot, hamstring problems, and he decided to take a few
months to investigate running. And he went all over the world investigating different runners and he found some barefoot runners. In 1960 and in 1964, Abebe Bikila, has anyone here heard of Abebe Bikila? – [Woman] Yep. – Abebe Bikila won gold
in the Olympic Games. He’s an African but
he’s a barefoot runner. Nike and Reebok hate him. (audience laughing) He was a barefoot runner. Now I think those feet must
have been pretty tough. But Christopher McDougall,
he actually searches out, and he finds a few barefoot runners. And when you run barefoot you
always hit with your toes, always hit with your toes. Now after that book was printed, then came the barefoot running craze. Now you know today, you
can even go into a shop and pay $200 still for a pair of joggers that are barefoot joggers,
have you seen that? When you buy joggers today, you should be able to press
them up against each other. So you want the thin-soled joggers. So when I read this book, I went straight to the shop and bought some thin-soled joggers. I thought they’d be a bit
cheaper, but they’re not (laughs). (audience tittering) And I love them, because it’s almost like you’ve
got nothing on your feet, you spring along. But as I started to do my
running in my barefoot joggers. Well they’re not barefoot joggers, but thin-soled joggers. Oh my legs. My legs, and my glutes,
all my muscles, so sore. I had sore muscles for a whole week. What does that tell ya? You’re using totally different muscles when you run by your toe strike, compared with your heel strike. And if you go barefoot on grass and do a run, you will
never run on your heel. Your body will not let
you run on your heel. In fact running on your heel, heel striking jars your lower back, jars your pelvis. Jars your knee and your ankle joints and also overstretches your hamstring. And that’s where you have trouble. So if you’re a runner, go to your toe striking. And you’ve probably seen, you can even buy joggers now with toes. Have you seen those? (laughs) They’re really soft. I said to one lady, I said, “Yeah, but how do you wear socks?” She said, “Well you buy socks with toes.” You can even buy socks that
have got the toes in them so I don’t quite go to that, but what you wanna look
for, if you’re a jogger, you wanna go for your thin-soled joggers. And if you do jog, it must
always be on the earth. Because so many people who are runners find that by the time
they’re in their 50s, they’re starting to have
lower back, hip, knee, ankle, because of the constant jarring. So be very mindful of that. Dr. Al Sears in his book, PACE, what the pace means is progressive, this is progressive, the more you do it, the fitter you get, the easier it will get,
the less time it takes. So progressive is the P. A is acceleration. You aren’t moving. This is no gentle stroll, you’re moving. And you just gotta find
out what works for you. So that’s A for acceleration in PACE. What’s the C? The C is cardiopulmonary. Cardio is heart. Our exercise coordinator at Misty Mountain Health
Retreat is Howard. Howard’s worked with us for about, I think about 17 years now. And our guests think that
he’s about 38 and he’s 54. He’s very, very fit. And he’s Dutch-Indonesian. So he’s got slightly dark skin and you know the dark skin
doesn’t seem to wrinkle as quickly as the white skin. And he loves exercise. His resting heart rate is
about 46 beats per minute. Now he hasn’t inherited that. That is moving that heart muscle. The more you move it, the stronger it gets and the less it has to beat. Because it gives such a powerful beat, it pumps so much blood with one pump that it doesn’t have to pump as much. So the C means cardiopulmonary. Pulmonary is lungs. The Framingham Heart Study, I mentioned it last night, famous study. The Framingham Heart Study
found that by the age of 50 most people had lost 40% lung capacity. By the age of 80, most people
had lost 60% lung capacity. So when you lose 40% lung capacity. Does that mean 40% of your cells aren’t getting near as much oxygen? Yeah. And remember what oxygen does, it’s what gives power, what gives more energy. So if you’ve lost lung capacity, how can you regain it? High intensity interval training. And if you do the high
intensity interval training, you will not lose your lung capacity. Isn’t that good news? So PACE, progressive acceleration
cardiopulmonary exertion. You are exerting yourself. This is no gentle stroll. I have another book in our library, it’s called Body By Science and it’s by Dr. Doug McGuff and what I’m ever thankful
to for this doctor is he takes you inside the cell. So we’re gonna go inside the cell and have a look at what exercise does. We’ve already gone inside the
cell a few times this week. The CBD, central business
district of the human body. The glucose goes in, and it goes through a 20 step pathway. And the end result of the 20 step pathway is a chemical form of
glucose called pyruvate. This 20 step pathway delivers
to us, two units of energy. Isn’t that why we eat? We eat to get glucose that
gets burnt in the cell to give us energy. Now the chemical form of glucose, it gets fed into another area and it’s called the powerhouse because this eight step pathway gives us a very impressive
36 units of energy. So what makes the difference? It’s oxygen. So this is what’s called
an aerobic pathway because it uses oxygen. This pathway is called anaerobic. It’s called anaerobic because
it doesn’t use oxygen. So this pathway produces energy by the process of fermentation. Whereas this pathway produces energy because of the presence of oxygen. What a difference oxygen makes. By the way, students,
how are you gonna feel if every single one of
your hundred trillion cells has got enough oxygen
to get down to there. Phew. We’re not gonna be able to hold you down. You’re gonna have so much energy. Have you seen the kids
running back into the house after they’re riding up and
down the paths a few times. (breathes heavily) Energy. You want that energy,
what have you gotta do? – [Man] Run. – You gotta get out on the bike, you gotta go up and down with them. I also showed you how that when
we don’t burn all our fuel, the body stores some as glycogen. Glycogen’s a name given to
quick release glucose stores. We looked at it earlier. So the glucose, the glucose when we eat it, number one, it’s sent to the cell. Some of it is stored as glycogen. That’s your quick release glucose stores. And when we looked at diabetes we showed how that’s a very
important back up of fuel. But on a high carbohydrate diet, many people have still
got glucose left over and so now it gets stored as fat. So let’s draw our fat
cells, here they are here, getting bigger and bigger on
the high carbohydrate diet. Most people don’t realize
that wheat and sugar gets stored as fat. Now what I wanna show you
is what’s happening in there when you’re doing this high
intensity interval training. So we’re getting to the
end of our first set of high intensity. The first set of 30 seconds. 20 step pathway speeds up. No wonder. Eight step pathway speeds up. But this 20 step pathway’s very fast. And this eight step pathway is slower. So when you’re 20 step speeds up, and your eight step speeds up, actually a problem starts to arise. As you’re sitting here right now, they actually feed quite
nicely into each other, but when you start moving, when you start running up a hill and both these pathways speed up, because of how fast this one’s going and there’s a rate setting enzyme in there keeping this one slower, we’re making more pyruvate than can be fed into the eight step. And so now the body
stores it as lactic acid. You’ve heard of lactic acid? Now I’ve got some exciting news. I think this is the most exciting
part of this presentation. In recovery time, what’s recovery time? (pants heavily) In recovery time, your liver
converts that lactic acid back to pyruvate and feeds it into the powerhouse. So when you’re in recovery time, just (breathes out) resting a little bit, you’re burning just as much fuel as when you’re running for your life. Isn’t that good news? But there’s more. So when you’re in recovery time, that’s when you stop and you’re looking at
the view, is that right? When you’re climbing a mountain, it’s a good idea to stop and look at the view a bit isn’t it? When you’re stopping
and looking at the view, you’re burning just as much fuel as when you’re climbing hard. So that’s good news. But something else is happening. Your lactic acid is being mopped up. Every recovery time, you’re mopping up excess lactic acid. And if you don’t mop up
the excess lactic acid, what happens to the lactic acid? Builds up, ooh that hurts. And when you’ve got a lot
of lactic acid building up in the tissues, in the cells, that’s creating an acid environment. And yesterday when we looked
at the acid-alkaline balance, actually it was only half
an hour ago, (laughs) when we looked at the
acid-alkaline balance, where does disease grow? In the acid environment. Let’s move on. We’re actually getting to our second and third
set of high intensity and the glycogen stores are being plucked. Remember they’re quick
release glucose stores. When you need them, they just get plucked, fed through the pathways. Plucked, fed through the pathways. But we’re getting to our fourth set. And our glycogen stores
have all been used up. And the body goes, “What
are we gonna do now?” We’re running out of fuel. And so the body’s got
something else up its sleeve. It releases the human growth hormone. The human growth hormone is
a naturally occurring hormone which is active when we’re growing. I haven’t grown much after the age of 16. Often girls don’t. My son, he grew two inches from 21 to 23. Boys can be growing a lot longer. It’s usually good news to boys. So my human growth hormone, when I stopped growing, when we stopped growing
it went into retirement. But in a crisis, and your body sees this
as a bit of a crisis, you’re running for your life, whoa, we need some help here. The human growth hormone is activated from the pituitary gland. Now the human growth hormone is often called youth hormone. And you’ll see why when
I explain what it does. So the human growth hormone is activated and it causes a release of
hormone sensitive lipase. hormone sensitive lipase is an enzyme that breaks down fat. But it particularly breaks
down your fat stores. Because isn’t that what fat is? It’s just stored fuel. And remember, we’re running out of fuel. The glycogen stores have all been plucked. So the human growth hormone is activated, it causes a release of
hormone sensitive lipase that starts breaking up your fat stores. And your body stops
burning glucose as fuel and becomes a fat burner. Now the reason why your body
starts burning fat as fuel is because glucose, it burns
at four calories per gram. Whereas fat, it burns at
nine calories per gram. Now every weight loss book
will have that information in psychedelic colors as the reason why you should stop the fat if you wanna lose weight. But they don’t understand
what a calorie is. A calorie is a unit of energy. So if you want a high energy
food, what do you eat? Fat. Now I’m not suggesting we
drink cup fulls of oil or fat. Nuts, seeds, coconuts, a
little bit of coconut oils. But you can see why the
human growth hormone causes the body to start
burning fat as fuel because it’s gonna give more
than twice the units of energy that glucose will give. The human growth hormone
increases the body’s ability to utilize protein. This week we’ve looked at
the importance of protein, we’ve looked at the importance
of eating sufficient protein, we’ve looked at the importance of not drinking a lot
of water with your meals so you’re not watering
down your hydrochloric acid so you can break down your protein, now we’re looking at another aspect. And the high intensity interval training with your high intensities, causes a release of the
human growth hormone which increases your body’s
ability to utilize protein. You see when you do that high
intensity in the morning, you’re laying a bed of hot
coals at the cellular level. And if you’ve got a fire
with a bed of hot coals, you can put huge logs in there
and it’ll burn the brighter. It’s as simple as this. If you wanna eat, you gotta work for it. So when you do the high
intensity interval training in the morning, come back, have your hot shower, and what do you do after the hot shower? – [Man] Have a cold one. Did you try it this morning? Did the neighbors hear you screaming? (audience laughing) You know what that quick cold does? It equalizes the circulation, has an incredible tonic effect, I’m sure it would have this morning, it was a bit cool. But it also, it increases cell repair. Cold is a wonderful tonic. Of course we don’t like it,
we’re warm blooded creatures. But that’s why it has such a tonic effect, because it (inhales sharply), the body actually reacts
to that cold touching us. So when you did your high
intensity interval training, had your hot and cold shower, had your water when you got back, now you have laid a bed of hot
coals at the cellular level and you can sit down and put the logs in, the millet, and the quinoa
and the coconut yogurt and the nuts and the seeds and the fruits. And your body will just burn the brighter. Because you’ve made a way available so that that fuel gets
burnt in a powerful way. The human growth hormone also increases the circulation of the blood to the skin. And when you increase the
circulation of the blood to the skin, you slow down aging. That’s good news. The movie stars pay $1,000 a week for this and I’m offering it to
you cut price today. (audience laughing) 15 minutes of high intensity
interval training a day, will cause a release of
the human growth hormone and that human growth hormone will remain active for 24 hours. What a bargain. You just gotta find out how to fit it in. Now I used to think that
I didn’t need to exercise ’cause I’m always buys. I’m gardening, running
here, running there. I thought I’m doing enough. And this happened about 13 years ago. I was asked to go to New
Zealand to give a lecture and it was a week’s long seminar and the lady I stayed
with was a Maori lady and she was twice my size,
10 years younger than me. And she said to me, “I go a five K walk every
day, do you wanna join me?” Now I still had kids at home at that time, still had a few teenagers at home and in the morning I’d
get up and wake the kids and push the wash on
and put the breakfast on and da da da. And I didn’t have to do that. There was just me. I was free (laughs). So I said, “Yeah, I’ll
join you for a five K jog.” After three Ks, I could
hardly keep up with her. Now she’s twice my size,
I’m the health teacher. It’s a bit embarrassing. When I wake up the next
morning, I could hardly move. My legs were so sore. She said, “Are you coming this morning?” I said, “Sure.” (laughs) (audience laughs) I’m the health teacher, I gotta go. It was very embarrassing. That night when I got up to lecture, it just killed me to move, I was just smiling and, I learnt my lesson. That’s when I realized being
busy all day is not enough. It is not enough. So what I did, and what I had to do to be able to do this, I started walking at 5:30 every morning. If I walked at 5:30, I could fit it in. Now to walk at 5:30 I had to make sure that I was well in bed by nine, so that I would wake at
five, every time I wake, I always do my prayer, I got a lot of children to pray for, a lot of sick people to pray for, a lot of staff to pray for, it takes a while. I always read my Bible and
then at 5:30 that I would walk. Now because I don’t have
any children at home now, and you know what it’s like with children, you love it when they’re there, and you love it when they go. (audience laughs) You’re free (laughs). One lady said, “I don’t know what to do, “my children have left home and
they’ve gone to university.” I said, “Rejoice.” (laughs) (audience laughs) “You’ve worked hard. “Now you’ve got some time.” And so yes, I am enjoying that time, mind you when I get home next week, I’ll have three little
grandsons staying with me. What are they? Seven and 11 and 12. Something like that. So I’ll be busy in my home then. And I will love that week. I will love it when they’re there. And guess what else? I will love it when they go (laughs). (audience laughing) It’s alright. In fact The Bible says, “I have learned in all things, “that whatever state I
am in, to be content.” That’s a powerful thing in
the mind, to be content. No matter what you’re doing,
no matter where you are. ‘Cause there’s always
something to be thankful for. So I’ll have a little bit of chaos castle in my house next week. Do you know what these
little boys do all day long? Play in the creek. They’re just in the creek all day long. Winter, summer, I come home from work and there are piles of
dirty clothes there. They must have fallen in the creek and got a few more clothes. I love second hand shops. I’ve got piles of clothes for them all. And those little boys, they never stop. They’ve got lots of energy. What do you do to get that energy? You’re active. I read in an old book, it said, “In a short time,
you will so experience “the benefits of pure air and exercise, “you would not live
without these blessings.” Can you see why I memorized that? And tomorrow I’m gonna show
you how you can do that. I don’t have a great memory
but I just work at it, I work at it, to get those
words and put them in there. So you can see that you can access what the movie stars pay $1,000 a week for by just implementing this exercise. You just gotta find out how
to fit it into your day. Because I think we’ve all got
15 minutes, is that right? If you don’t think you’ve got 15 minutes, just have an assessment of what you do with your time in the day. How much time to do you spend
watching television? (laughs) How much time do you
spend on your computer, on your iPhone, on your iPad? Just address all that. But there is a form of
exercise that is probably the most accessible, no matter who you are and no matter what age you
are, and that is rebounding. Rebounding is a little mini trampoline. Now Albert Carter, he
wrote a book on rebounding, I think he wrote his book
in about the 80s or 90s. You see, he was an Olympian trampolinist. And he married and had a
couple of little children and they would do a trampoline show. They would go from town
to down doing this, all these tricks on the trampoline. And he noticed that his
little four year old girl, he could hold her feet, her ankles, and she could do one arm push ups. Have you ever tried one arm push ups? Even a four year old finds that very hard. And his little boy was seven and he would challenge kids at school, he’d do 1,000 push ups. And he scratched his head and he thought, “Why are my kids so strong?” I don’t know if ever looked
in the mirror, but you know, (grunts) he was built like this. No weight building, just trampolining. So he began to investigate, why was this form of exercise so powerful? And he found it very hard to
get any documentation on this until he came to NASA and NASA discovered that the
trampolining, or the rebounding was the only form of exercise
that increased the g-force of the astronauts to be able
to handle going out of space. And what NASA found was when
their astronauts got back from out of space, they had lost 25% muscle strength and also bone strength. And what rebounding did,
it reduced that loss. Because in outer space,
there’s no gravity. And rebounding defies gravity more than any other form of exercise because you’re constantly
going up against gravity. So what NASA found that
this was the only form of exercise that prepared
their astronauts for no gravity and it was the only form of exercise that returned their fitness quickly, which is what they needed. But Albert Carter, he was
even more intrigued as to why. Why was this such a
powerful form of exercise. And this is what he found. He found it’s the only
exercise that defies gravity. Well most exercise defies gravity, but no exercise defies
gravity the way this does. So number one, he called
them the three teachers. Defies gravity. And he found that Einstein
acknowledged this, that these two other teachers, the body doesn’t know the
difference between them and defying gravity. And one is acceleration. See when you’re on the rebounder and you’re jumping up, you’re accelerating. And when you get to the peak of your jump, acceleration stops and
you get deceleration and then as you go down, you’re accelerating again, then when you hit the mat, deceleration, then up again, so you’re
constantly doing acceleration and deceleration at the same
time as you’re defying gravity. So these three forces come together and explains why it’s such
a powerful form of exercise. And every single cell in the body is getting constantly shocked. Every time you jump on the mat, it’s a shock, shock, shock, shock, shock. So every single cell in the
body is getting strengthened. Bones are getting strengthened. And regarding cells, that’s what we are. We’re just a whole bunch of cells. It’s the most powerful
form of exercise there is, is the rebounding, and
yet the most simple. What Albert Carter has also written is a whole book on eye sight and how rebounding strengthens eye sight. How does it do that? Well yes, the rebounding affects the eyes as it affects every cell in the body. But try this, I do it every day, is when you’re rebounding
and you’re jumping, your focus, say for me, outside
I’m rebounding in my house and I’ve got big glass doors, and I look out and my car’s there, and in front of my car’s the
veranda with my hanging pots, so I’ll focus on a
flower in the hanging pot and the car is doing this
in my peripheral vision. And then I’ll change my focus to the handle on the car and then the plant that
I had just focused still, it starts to jump. So every 10 jumps, I change my focus, change my focus, change
my focus, change my focus, I got gum trees out there, and
then I got pine trees there and then I got a branch there and then there’s a wallaby
sitting there in the front yard. Can you see that? You just keep changing your focus and it strengthens your eye sight. And it makes rebounding such fun, constantly refocusing. What Albert Carter also shows, if someone has poor balance, it’ll actually restore your balance. And how many people don’t wanna rebound ’cause they think they’ll fall off. Well you can get a
handle on your rebounder. But if you don’t have the handle, just hold on to something nearby, hold on to a chair, hold
on to something nearby until you get your balance. Now why does rebounding reset balance? Rebounding resets balance because your balance is set by the fine mechanisms in your ear and also your receptor sites that you have on the bottom of your feet. So constantly bounding,
resets that mechanism and also resets the, well you’ve got your receptor sites that are helping reset your balance. But probably one of
the most amazing things about the rebounder is what is does to your lymphatic system. Your lymphatic system is
your body’s vacuum cleaner. It sweeps away waste from the tissues. And as I mentioned last night when we looked at your immune system your capillary networks
have muscles around them and every time your heart beats, those muscles contract which is pushing the
blood away from your heart and remember your second heart? Have you been working
your second heart today? You automatically do when you walk, which is your calf muscle. And that’s why in the plane, you make your feet go
up and down like this because that’s working your calf muscle. But your lymphatic system
does not have a pump. So what activates your
lymphatic system is movement. But the movement that
activates your lymphatic system in the most powerful way is rebounding. So your lymphatic system
is a network of capillaries and there are little gates or valves all the way along those canals. And they’re shut. They’re shut when you
wake up in the morning. And when you get up and walk around, some of them open. But when you rebound, they
open in a powerful way. So when you’re jumping on the rebounder, when you’re up to the height of the jump, every gate opens. And when you hit the
mat, every gate closes. And when you jump again, every gate opens, and when you hit the
mat, every gate closes. So you get this pumping action
of your lymphatic system and your lymphatic
system sweeps away waste from the tissues. And on our first night we looked at the role of microorganisms and disease and how they’re just
opportunist organisms. They’re just gonna be found
where there’s a lot of waste. So activating your lymphatic
system every single day, you only have to jump on that
rebounder for two minutes and your lymphatic system
is activated to the point where it’ll stay activated all day. Activated meaning those little gates will keep opening and shut. ‘Cause every time you move, every time you walk, every time you turn around, that helps to maintain your lymphatic system, constantly moving. So for people who have edema, rebound. For people who are
retaining fluid, rebound. For people with poor vision, rebound. For people with the balance problems, rebound. For people with incontinence, rebound. One lady said, “No, no,
I stopped rebounding, “because if I rebound, I feel like “I’m going to be incontinent.” I said, “That’s because
that’s the very muscle “that’s strengthened when you rebound.” And when you get your
rebounder and children visit, where will they be? (audience laughing) On the rebounder. I’ve come to the conclusion
that people get old because they stop jumping. It’s time to jump. And if you’re a little uncertain, all you have to do is start with this. That’s all you have to do. You don’t have to leave the mat. The best is you leave, you jump, but just get yourself used to it. One of the best knee
rebounders is the Needak. It’s an American rebounder, but they have an Australian distributor. So I’m warning you against the $29 jobs that you’ll find in the sports shop because it’s almost just
like jumping on the ground. And some say, “Well can’t you skip,
can’t you just jump?” every time you land on the ground, you’re actually jarring your body. The beauty of the rebounder is you’ve got this bounce,
so there’s no jarring, there’s no jarring at all. So people with knee,
ankle and hip problems, it’s the best form of exercise there is. In fact, if every office had
a rebounder in the corner, and everyone in the office rebounded for one minute every hour, I think the office’d be closed
about 3:00 in the afternoon ’cause all the work’d be done (laughs). (audience laughing) The people’s minds would
be so much clearer. So it is one of the, well it is classified as
the most powerful exercise that there is, is rebounding. And yet it’s the simplest. Now the figures are, and Albert Carter states that you only have to do three
minutes, three times a day. That’s not very much is it? Or, you can implement your high intensity
interval training on it. Some people like their morning stroll. Nice and quietly through the trees. I said, “Do your morning stroll, “but when you come back, or before you go, “do your interval training.” A friend of mine way saying
that she watched her little boy, I think he was about five at the time, and he’d be playing with his Lego and she said, “About every half hour “he just jumps up and rebounds
for a couple of minutes “and comes back and plays with Lego again “and then jumps and rebounds again.” Now who told him to do that? He just naturally does it. So it’s time to move the body. It’s the best insurance
policy that you can make, is just taking that little time every day, you just gotta work out what suits you. In fact you can’t afford not to do it. The dividends that it will give you far exceed the effort
that you put into it. It’s time to move the body, remember strength comes by exercise. There is actually no other way. Are there any questions before we close? Yes. (“Amazing Grace”)