DIY Noni PUKE FRUIT JUICE Taste Test | Fruity Fruits

DIY Noni PUKE FRUIT JUICE Taste Test | Fruity Fruits


“Fruity” song Greetings my beautiful lovelies! It’s Emmy. Welcome back to another Fruity
Fruits episode where I taste fruits that are fruity. Today’s video is going to be
a continuation of one that I shot about two months ago for noni fruit. Today I’m
going to be tasting my noni juice. Now if you missed that noni video, I’ll put
the link up above and down below — and you can check out that whole experience
there. Noni fruit, if you’re not familiar with it, is a tropical fruit
that is known also as the puke fruit, or the stinky cheese fruit. It is a very odoriferous fruit about this size; and it has a very pungent smell to it. And yes,
check out the taste test if you missed that video. So besides having a very
strong smell, noni is also known in traditional Polynesian medicine as a
tonic fruit. There also have been some studies that have shown that noni shows anti-inflammatory and potential anti-cancer properties as well. So a lot
of potential there — if you can get over the smell. But, as a tonic, noni was
prepared as a juice. So after I did my noni taste test,
I prepared my noni in the traditional fashion of just washing the fruit,
putting it in a clean glass jar, and placing it outside in the sun. It’s
supposed to sit there for several months — now this has been sitting for over two
months, and it just turned into this…. Oh my word! Now I’ve watched lots of
videos; I looked at lots of references; and this is what it’s supposed to look
like: the noni turns into this kind of black/brown fruit and the juice collects
down in the bottom. So, pretty unattractive; but I knew what I
was getting into because when I looked at all the other references on how to
make this fermented juice this is exactly what the noni looked like. And
you’re supposed to let it sit in the sun… but here in New England — I live in Rhode
Island — we are now coming into winter — and there hasn’t been a lot of sun. I
actually had to bring this inside because we’re experiencing freezing
temperatures; didn’t want this to freeze; didn’t want a glass to break. So I
brought it inside, and I’ve been letting it sit, but I’ve noticed this: this is
something that I didn’t see in other people’s videos — and that my friends is a
mold colony. So I paid eighty two dollars for a box of noni to be shipped to me
from Florida, and I’m gonna try a couple of things. So when I researched making
noni juice online, I read that you can pasteurize it. It’s actually recommended
that you pasteurize it. You bring up the noni juice to one hundred and sixty
degrees… and then, after you do that, you can do a pH test, so I’ve got myself some
beautiful litmus paper. It was recommended that the pH be at 3.5 which is in this range here, in this kind of red-orange range — that is
considered acidic. Right in the middle, when you have yellow, is neutral — that’s what
water is — and then down on this end is basic. And so if it’s not in this red
zone, I’m not gonna even attempt to try it. If you are at all like me, you’re
very curious to see what this smells like, so, let’s find out. I don’t think it’s
gonna be good, but let’s let’s…. Rubber gloves here — and get this open. Okay! There
we go! All right, from upon first crack, I’m not smelling anything. Oh boy. I’m slightly afraid. Don’t be, Emmy. Don’t be! Ooh… Actually, it’s much better! It’s slightly
there…but not nearly as strong. It doesn’t smell bad, really — that bad at all!
It smells slightly medicinal; it’s got kind of a astringent smell to it. It smells almost a little bit like um… slightly like turpentine or something. It has a
little bit of a kind of piney smell to it. Wow that’s absolutely fascinating — it doesn’t stink. Wow! I am so…. Okay, I’m a
little bit relieved about that — let me show you a shot of what this looks like
inside. It’s not pretty, y’all. It’s not pretty. I’m gonna remove some of the noni fruit and
put it into my compost pot here…. And, yeah…. goodbye! Thank you! Oh boy. See? That one… Ugh. All right, compost! I’m gonna pour this into
here. Whoa! I didn’t get much juice at all. That’s probably a third of a cup? I
imagine I’m gonna end up evaporating a good portion of this, but, we’ll see. It
smells pretty good, actually: none of that characteristic cheesy smell;
kind of amazing! Okay. I love fermentation! While we’re on the
tangent, have you gotten yourself a “Toodaloo, Take care, Bye” shirt yet? If you
haven’t, you should definitely do that because there’s only three days left in the sale.
Okay, let’s cook the noni juice! It’s at a hundred and eight-seven.
So this is already up to temp. Now that this is nicely pasteurized, I’m gonna let that
cool down a bit. Now litmus paper is special paper that can tell you the pH
of a solution. Dip that… Four or five? By a good amount…. when I first
poured it in there I had about a half a cup; and now I’ve got more about a third of a
cup — about three ounces from an entire jar of noni. All righty. I’m gonna give this the
tiniest little taste. Here we go. Cheers! Wow!!
It is actually very, very acidic; and not nearly as astringent as it was when I had
it in its raw form. When I had it raw, immediately you got this kind of tongue
numbing sensation — it was very, very odd — and lasting. This is very, very different:
this is very tangy and sour; almost as sour as, say, lemon juice; not as
concentratedly sour; and it has a similar flavor as the noni as well: a
very interesting kind of pungent, slightly hoppy, bitter-y
turpentine-y flavor to it — with a little bit of funk — but not nearly as funky and
strong and fetid and cheesy as in its raw state. It’s mellowed out a lot. It’s
tartened up a lot as well. So the fermenting process does change this. And
I have to say, having it warm is a little bit odd as well. So I imagine if this was
at room temperature it wouldn’t be so kind of odoriferous — I imagine. But, not
bad! I much prefer it in the juice form than in its raw form, and I think mostly
that had to do with that very odd tongue- numbing sensation; also the smell; the
smell of the raw form was really, really tough. And also when you see it in
this juice form and you don’t see the really chunky, squelchy, soft fruit, it
makes it more palatable. Alrighty, so there you have it: homemade noni juice. Let me
know in the comments down below if you’ve ever had this particular juice
before; the fruit before; or any other interesting fruits that you’d like to see
me taste or try. Share this video with your friends; follow me on social media;
LIKE; subscribe; grab yourself a “Toodaloo, Take care, Bye” shirt;
and I shall see you in the next video. Toodaloo! Take care! Bye! Litmus paper’s cool!