Controlling Fruit Pests – Family Plot

Controlling Fruit Pests – Family Plot


All right, Mr. D, fruit tree pests. You know,
we’re getting the call at the office, you know, about peaches, plums, nectarines, and
pests that are affecting us all. – You know, you got a fruit tree out there
right now, you’ve already got fruit on it. If it has a worm in it, that fruit is already,
you know, it’s gone, and there isn’t anything you can do about it. If you grow tree fruits
in this area, you need to put them under a regular spray program, home orchard spray.
If by some chance you haven’t done that, and you have some fruit on your trees that are
not already affected by, if it’s a peach, plum, or nectarine, it would be the plum curculio
probably, and you could look at the fruit. If you look at the fruit and it looks clean,
and it doesn’t have a little C shaped scar on the fruit, you may very well not have a
work in it yet, and go ahead and start following a spray schedule using a home orchard spray
that you can get at any lawn and garden center. It’ll have an insecticide and a fungicide
in it, and you just follow the label directions, and do that every week, you know once a week.
If it doesn’t rain, you could stretch that interval out to 10 days. If it rains, you
spray today and it rains tomorrow, you pretend that that application didn’t even take place
because it washed it off, but a regular spray program is the only way that you’re gonna
have fruit that don’t have worms or rots and things like that in it. And like I said, if
you already have, if that fruit is already infected with an insect or a disease, there’s
not anything you can do about it. Pick it off, destroy it, whatever, you know, just
get rid of it, but it’s not gonna, unless you want to do a, you know, you can cut around
the worm if you want to, and throw it out, and eat the part that’s not affected or cut
the rot out and all that kind of stuff, and you may salvage a bite or two of the fruit,
but you know, gotta be careful doing that. – I thought you were going to mention that
these worms would be good protein. – I would, except for all of the E. Coli recalls
that we’ve had, and you know, so I would probably try to resist eating a worm, and if you see
that you’ve only got a half a worm in the food, then that’s too late to worry about
that too, yeah. – Now, what about, we talked specifically
about, let’s say peaches, I mean, what pest do you know attacks peaches? – Peaches, it would be the plum curculio is
the insect that, the number one insect with peaches. Of course, stink bugs will attack,
and you know, and if you have a fruit that are kind of catfaced or mishapen, and curled
and all that, that might very well be a stink bug or you know, something with sucking mouthparts
that cause that to happen, but you know, with plum curculio, the female will land on that
fruit, she’ll cut a little semicircle and lay an egg underneath it, and I don’t know
if she pats it back down or not, but she just lays an egg under that little semicircle,
so you’ll have that little half moon scar on the fruit, and you won’t notice. The fruit
will continue to grow and look fine, but the caterpillar is doing the same thing too. – [Chris] How many eggs do you think? – Usually they only lay one on each fruit. – [Chris] Just one. Just one, yeah, ’cause
they want to make sure that little fella’s got plenty to eat. You know, they don’t usually
do more than one on a fruit that I’ve seen. But they’ll fly to the next fruit, you know,
and do the same thing, they just continue on. You know, with apples, it’s you know,
there’s a codling moth, there’s several different critters that do the same thing. And with
most insects, we say it’s good to identify what you’ve got before you treat, but that’s
not the case with fruit trees. You need to do a preventative and the home orchard sprays
are broad spectrum enough to take control of pretty much all the pests that are on there. – Right, do they control stink bugs, though,
you think? – Kinda sorta, you know, kinda sorta, I mean,
you’re talking about most of the home orchard sprays have carbaryl or malathion in ’em,
and if it’s malathion, it will do a better job probably on stink bugs, but you know,
if you got stink bugs, unfortunately, what you need to use in a home orchard’s not labelled
for home orchard use. Commercial guys can use some harder materials, but you probably
don’t need to be doing that around the home. Two bricks, you know, get out there, catch
’em, smack ’em. – What about pears, we actually had somebody
ask a question? – Pears, pretty much the same thing. You treat
apples and pears the same way. Apples and pears don’t seem to have as much insect pressure
here as peaches, plums, nectarines, but again, the same schedule, and a home orchard spray
guide that you can get from our office, it has apples, and it has pears. Some of the
diseases, like fire blight for instance, when you’re looking at pears, it’ll say, see the
apple section, see the apple section, so I would treat my apples or pears pretty much
the same way, and treat your peaches, plums, and nectarines the same way. – Okay, now, I’ll mention this because we’ve
been getting this question quite a bit lately, so we have folks who want to control their
pest organically on their fruit trees, what do you say about that? – Chainsaw. – Chainsaw, wow. – Yeah, I know of nothing they could organically
unless they’re, you know, standing out there with a water hose, and defending them, I know
of nothing that will work for fruit trees, and so my suggestion to you is, if you want
to do that, is grow something else. Don’t, that’s why I don’t have a peach tree in my
orchard, you know, or a plum or a nectarine. They’re by far the hardest to grow, you know,
without having to be out there every week, you know, spring, so I don’t know, you know,
I wish I did. I wish I could tell you something that would work but you know, it’s just not
gonna happen. I mean, even Bt on the caterpillars. Now, if we come up with a genetically modified
fruit tree that has Bt in the fruit, you know, it would help on the plum curculio, the caterpillars,
and things like that, but we have none of those at this point, and I doubt, well I don’t
know that that’s gonna happen any time soon. – Wow, how about that, chainsaw, wow. Yeah,
so do, people can try something organic. – Do something different, you know, plants,
your ornamental shrubs or something, you know. – And I guess, too, they can look for resistant
varieties, I mean. – I don’t know of any, I don’t know of any
varieties that are resistant to insects. Now, there are some varieties that may have some
disease resistance, but I don’t know of any of those that are resistant to brown rot,
which is, you know, the major disease on peaches, plums, and nectarines. I just don’t know that
any of ’em exist. You may have some that are resistant to bacterial spot. You know, things
like that, some varieties are more susceptible to bacterial spot than others are, but as
far as the diseases and insects, I think they, doesn’t make any difference what variety you’ve
got. – Wow, as you always say, peaches, plums,
and nectarines are going to be pretty tough. – They’re pretty tough. Buy em, you know.
Jones Orchard, Miss Juanita, and Mr. Lee Wood, and their crew do a real good job growing
peaches. – [Chris] Yes they do. – And they take care of ’em in the South,
you know, well they’re around. – All right, well we appreciate that Mr. D,
always good.