Choosing a Healthy Eating Style

Choosing a Healthy Eating Style


[multiple speakers]
Eating! [Blast of music] Yes, eating is awesome. Eating foods
you like is even more awesome. – Pop quiz. What does eating
have to do with school? Answer. Students with healthier
eating styles do better in their classes. There’s actual research
that shows this. School is easier when
your eating style is healthy. – Your eating style is all the foods
you eat over the course of a week, month, or year.
Making that a healthy style doesn’t mean giving up all the fun.
All the foods you like can still fit in. – But how can you tell what
a healthy eating style is? – It sounds complicated.
– But it’s not. Scientists and other experts have been
working a long time on figuring out what a healthy eating style looks like
and making easy ways to remember it. – That’s where this
illustration comes in. It’s called MyPlate. It’s a picture of what experts
in medicine, nutrition, and public health have figured out
is a healthy eating style. – Behind the illustration are the
verbal recommendations called the Dietary Guidelines
for Americans. – The idea is, half your plate
has fruits and vegetables on it. The other half is
grains, proteins, and dairy. – Wait. Did I hear that right?
– Yes! Half the plate is fruits and vegetables.
If you suspect you’re not eating as many of these as recommended,
you’re not alone. Especially when it
comes to vegetables, most Americans aren’t
meeting the guidelines. It’s recommended most teenagers have
two to three cups of vegetables per day. – We found vegetables have lots
of important nutrients like fiber, potassium – which your body needs
to build muscle and make your heart pump, Vitamin A –
which you need to see, and Vitamin C – which you need
to fight off infections and heal when you’re
injured or sick. – Luckily, there’s a lot of variety
within the vegetable world. In fact, there are five subgroups.
And it’s best to eat from all of them. You’ll find the most vitamins
and minerals in the red, orange, and dark green subgroups – things like
sweet potatoes, red bell peppers, tomatoes, or broccoli, kale, or bok choy.
– The starchy vegetable subgroup gives you energy, but not
as many other nutrients. Corn and potatoes are in this subgroup.
– The beans and peas, or legumes, subgroup is unique because these
veggies, like black beans or chickpeas, give you protein and iron,
similar to meat. – There’s also a subgroup called Other.
These veggies also have nutrients you need.
We’re talking cauliflower, cucumbers, green bell peppers,
onions, summer squash, and more. – Getting back to the rest of your
plate, let’s look at the grains. One thing to remember is the difference
between whole and refined grains. – It might seem confusing at first,
but the idea is simple. – The part of the grain we eat is a seed.
We grind it into flour for making bread or crackers or what have you.
– The seed has three layers. At one point, people figured out how
to easily remove the bran and the germ. The taste and the texture of the
resulting white flour were a revelation. – But then people started getting sick.
It turned out it was from not getting the B vitamins that are
in the bran and the germ. – So eventually, people added some
nutrients back into the refined grain. That makes an enriched grain.
– But whole grains are best of all, and they’re back to being popular.
Pay attention to labels, though. Whole grain products can
have refined grains mixed in. – Also, not every darker grain
product is a whole grain. It might just have molasses
or coloring in it. – If you see the word “whole”
before a grain in the ingredients list, or “100% whole grain” on the front
of a package, those are good signs. Okay. Let’s eat! [bite sounds] Oh, wait! One more thing
about your eating style. – Try to include only a little food
with these three things – added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium.
– When they’re natural sugars in fruit, milk, or vegetables, they always
go along with some nutrition, but when food manufacturers artificially
add sugar to things like soda and desserts, all you get is more calories.
So they’re best for just an occasional treat.
– Saturated fat and sodium, if you have too much of them,
can be bad for your heart and your blood pressure.
Some of the big sources are whole milk, cheese, and non-lean meats.
[moo sound] – Sodium is tricky. It doesn’t always
taste salty, like in bread or lunch meat. So, once again, the nutrition
labels are your friend. – Here’s a shortcut.
Eat fewer processed foods. Food from boxes tend to have more
of the bad stuff and less of the good. Another shortcut to healthier eating
style can be eating school lunch. – It’s true. Most schools that
offer lunches are part of a national program that sticks
pretty close to MyPlate. There’s plenty of fruit,
vegetables from every subgroup, lean proteins, low-fat dairy …
– And, in both school lunch and school breakfast, at least half
of the grains are whole grains. Everything you eat and drink matters.
So if you’ve got a plate in front of you, look at how your eating style
is fitting into MyPlate. – Small changes will add up to big wins
for your brain, body, and happiness. – There’s more
information online. [Music] [Silence]