Best Temperature to Store Fruits and Vegetables So they Last Weeks Not Days + Haul

Best Temperature to Store Fruits and Vegetables So they Last Weeks Not Days + Haul


Alright, this is John Kohler with ‘OkRaw.com’
today we have another exciting episode for you. Today just got back from the ‘Los Angeles
Wholesale Produce Terminal’ as well as the farmer’s markets and whatnot in Southern
California, so I want to give you guys an episode actually of my produce haul, also
my plant haul but more importantly kind of tie into that, because the optimal storage
temperatures for all the different fruits and vegetables that I bought this trip. I mean that’s one of the things I’ve had
to learn over the many years -22 years now that I’ve been into raw foods- is how to
you store the produce the best way possible, so that it stores the longest. So that you don’t have your produce going
bad before you have time to eat it. This is especially important if you buy in
bulk like I do. Of course if the produce is going bad than
I like to juice it, just get it out of my refrigerator and into me, so juicing concentrates
the volume of fruits and vegetables I can eat to make them significantly more than just
trying to eat the fruit and vegetable alone. So yea, another question I get a lot of when
I do these episodes is, “John how do you store the produce?” Well now I’m going to share with you guys
how to do that in this episode, so by the end of this episode you’re going to be an
expert in produce storage, any kind of produce so you guys can maximize your shelf life and
keep the nutrition and the taste levels as high as possible. Anyways lets go ahead and open the trunk of
the car and show you guys what I got this trip. Alright so as you guys can see I got produce
and plants. So here we got some heirloom sugar beets and
now the first thing I want to tell you guys is just check this out: Once you harvest the
fruit or vegetable it has a timeline where from like here to like there when it’s like
done, it goes bad. The cool thing is when you’re growing plants
these babies are still alive, you know these leave will not go bad -like cut salad greens
they’re going to go bad- these guys are still living and I only pick the greens on
here when I’m ready to eat them, so there’s no storage necessary and this is what I encourage
you guys to do, this is the best way to eat our food. No storage, we shouldn’t have to be going
to the produce terminal, we should have –be living in a garden of Eden where you can just
go out and harvest all your greens as well as your fruits fresh and just pick them as
you need them and they could just be held on the tree or on the plant. So yea, these are heirloom sugar beets, they’re
going to make beet roots, which are quite sweet, they’re white and also the greens
grow really well, pretty much for a full year. So yea, I get a lots of use out of these guys. Another plant that I’d encourage you guys
to grow are these guys, this is the dinosaur kale or Lacinato kale, black kale, Tuscan
kale, there’s so many different words for it. But, this kale is one of the best kales to
grow because it chlorates the heat quite well, 100 degrees plus no problem, 32 degrees, 30
degrees, no problem whatsoever, these guys just get sweeter in the cold weather and now
in the hot weather they’re a bit more stronger tasting, but hey that’s a sign of more phytonutrients
that are probably anti-cancer and whatnot. But yea I also like the dino-kale and once
again these plant starts right, no expiration provided they’re still on the plant. Next flat coming out are these guys, this
is actually heirloom strawberry spinach, so this is another kind of spinach you guys may
not be familiar with, unless you’re growing it yourself you’ve probably never tried
this strawberry spinach. It makes these little red fruits like strawberries,
but it tastes nothing like strawberries and they’re not really that sweet but they’re
interesting. But it does make leafy greens that are very
similar and related to the standard spinach that you guys know and love, and has a quite
neat flavor. These are a shorter turn crop, so these aren’t
going to hangout like as long as the beet greens or the dinosaur kale that I showed
you, but I like to get variety and you know that’s why I really want to encourage you
guys to grow your own food, because it allows you to get more variety into your diet; because
some of the things that I grow you just can’t even buy, I mean even if you had a million
dollars you couldn’t even buy this stuff. Okay, last bunch of plants I got here in the
trunk, I got some ornamental kale and cabbage so you know I really want to encourage you
guys to grow your foods and eat your foods in color, so I got lots of purple and reddish
colored kale and cabbage and some white ones too, just because they’re pretty. But even the ornamental cabbages and kale
they are edible and most often times they’re grown for looking pretty, but these are absolutely
edible and I encourage you guys to grow them; sometimes when they sell ornamental kale and
cabbage they may be treating them with chemicals and whatnot, cause they’re grown for ornamental
use and not edible use. So, if you are buying these for edible use
than I would encourage you guys to make sure that the place you’re buying them from does
not spray or start them from seed. Alright lets go ahead and get into some of
the produce and the deals I got and also the optimal storage temperatures. Ok first fruit I going to share with you guys
today I got at the farmer’s market here, we went to the ‘Torrens Farmer’s Market’
these are the sapotes or green sapotes, and you’re like wondering, ‘John, how come
you got that landing strip down the middle?” Well these are just sponges, and I just bought
some sponges cause I needed sponges for my kitchen but the reason why I put the sponges
in the middle was because the way this was setup and when I closed the trunk you guys
can see that little hinge there, that hinge was just going to gauge in the middle row
so I put the sponges there so they wouldn’t get gouged by the door. So anyways these sapotes were 2 dollars a
pound and I got a bunch, I got like this little flat full and how I’m going to store these
sapotes are in the fridge in a warmer fridge, because I have three fridges and they’re
each set at different temperatures, but the best way to store the sapotes between like
66 and 70 degrees provided that they’re not ripe like this, and they’ll store for
2 to 3 weeks. Now these guys are little bit riper so I’m
probably going to put them in a fridge that’s a little bit colder and we’ll going to be
eating these over the next couple days cause once they get ripe you got to eat them really
quick. So the next fruits I got, I got some cherimoya
this is a whole flat of cherimoya I ended up eating some of them so we got some the
sapotes in here, but I as you guys can see –I don’t know if you guys can see that-
but these cherimoyas actually are quite ripe and actually they got some mold on them cause
I haven’t been storing these guys properly. These guys should be stored at about 50 to
55 degrees to retain optimal flavor, storing below recommended temperatures may cause damage
to the fruit and they may turn black inside if they’re tropical fruit or something like
that, you know they may just –the taste may not like taste as good as they should
or what not. But, anyways if you store these guys at the
proper temperature they could last like 2 to 3 weeks which is amazing, now check this
out: If you guys store these at 60 degrees which is like probably like the car ride back
here, it’ll only store for like 2 to 3 days so just you know 10 degrees difference, 5
degrees difference in temperature could mean your fruit lasting a long time to just a short
amount of time. So, yea these guys are already molding, just
surface mold they’re going to be fine on the inside but once again this is probably
like maybe my next meal, maybe even after this video and the cherimoya 2 dollars and
75 cents a pound for nice ripe cherimoya. Alright let’s see I can do some magic ‘Poof’
alright you guys could see what we got underneath there: Alright we got my luggage that don’t
count. But what we got is some blueberries, so I
got the blueberries today at ‘Heath and Lejeune’ and they’re a dedicated organic
produce supplier in LA and I go there when I need to get something specific and the regular
terminal didn’t have the blueberries today so I got these as a 12-4.4 ounces organic
blueberries ‘Natural Ripe’ it was like 19.95 so that’s pretty cheap you know, but
I spent like good money for these guys and buying them from ‘Heath and Lejeune’ in
this situation is actually cheaper than buying them from ‘Costco’ which is where I normally
get them, this time of year they sell like 18 ounce container for like maybe 9.99 so
that’s actually generally a really good deal cause sometimes wherever you guys live
just these 4 inch little or the 4 ounce packages might cost like 2.99 or 3.99 each so I got
them for like a dollar-sixty-seven or something like that. But, anyways we ate a flat actually we ate
12-4 ouncers just today for breakfast and lunch in between me and Lauren, but to store
these guys you want to store them at like 32 degrees and if you store them at 32 degrees
you know, I’ve had these guys last like several weeks in the fridge without any incident. Once again, once you break that cold chain
you want to try minimize the break of the cold chain for as short a time as possible,
so if you go buy them in the store and they’re fridged you want to try to get them out of
the store from they’re fridge to your house in your fridge as quickly as possible cause
the warmer they get that’s also going to shorten the time that they will store for
you once you have them under an ideal storage temperatures. So what I got next were some organic mangoes
and we got a two case of organic mangoes, each case was 5 bucks for –8 pieces for
5 bucks definitely a good deal for organic mangoes and these mangoes, some of these guys
are ripe, they’re kind of soft and ready to eat and some are a little bit firmer. So depending if they’re soft and ready to
eat then I’ll store them in the fridge and if they’re not then I’m going to store
them out of the fridge and to store mangoes you want to store them between 50 and 55 degrees
and then you’ll be able to lengthen they’re storage time and the thing with mangoes is
I know most of you guys put them in your fridge and your fridge is definitely not at 50 degrees,
anything below 50 degrees, mangoes will get damaged and now this may not happen like within
a day but after a couple days you’re going to notice on the inside the mangoes may start
turning brown and the texture might get kind of funky and all this kind of stuff. So I always encourage you guys to properly
store your mangoes and your other fruits whenever you’re able, I might store these in one
of my fridges that’s maybe in the 40s, 45, or something like that and keep an eye on
it and not store them in there too long, and I’ll be able to eat these just me and my
girlfriend could mouth through like a case or two just in a couple days no problem. So yea, anyways that’s how you store your
mangoes. Next what I got coming out is one whole case,
25 pounds of organic peppers. I really want to encourage you guys to eat
some peppers, normally in the summer I grow my peppers but in the winter I don’t. So we got a case of organic red peppers, “Heath
and Lejeune’ is an excellent deal actually most things at ‘Heath and Lejeune’ are
quite expensive but I looked at their price list and try to find their best price things
that are going to send me the most and its definitely the peppers, I love to make a pepper
soup and peppers if you go to the store and buy them especially organic ones man, they
can be quite expensive, a couple bucks each sometimes. Anyways this box is 25 pounds was like 18
dollars and 75 cents, an amazing deal and to store these peppers its best to the peppers
at about 45 degrees, that’s going to ensure they’re going to not get any kind of damage
cause of the cold and also store for quite a long time. You know I’ve stored peppers easily for
like two weeks provided they’re in good shape once you get them; so one of the main
things we do once we get these home is we go through them, anyone’s that are damaged
we put those in a bin and those are the ones like we’ll even use tonight or tomorrow
and then the rests of the ones that look pretty good we’ll put them in proper storage conditions
so they can stay for longer so we get to benefit from the peppers. The peppers are one of the most nutrient dense
non-sweet fruits you guys could eat and I do encourage you guys to eat the red, orange,
or yellow peppers whenever you can instead of the green ones that are actually unripe. Alright so we just got my suitcase here if
you want to see how I travel eating raw, be sure to check the link down below for my last
produce haul where I actually go in and share with you guys all the different gadgets and
things I travel with. But the last things I got today was I got
2 cases of one of my favorite fruits, these guys are known as the cactus fruits. Cactus fruits are -the red ones anyways- are
probably one of the most anti-inflammatory fruits and turmeric one of the most anti-inflammatory
roots, that I encourage you guys to eat on a regular bases and I would encourage you
guys to expand the diversity of the foods you’re eating in your diet, I know you might
always get bananas and mangoes and whatnot but try some cactus fruits once in a while,
my girlfriend just loves to peel them and then eat them whole, I love to actually juice
them, I like to juice even amounts of red to greens. The red ones tend to be more antioxidant and
nutrient packed, the green ones tend to be sweeter so they kind of balance each other
out. Anyways I’ve stored cactus fruits for up
to a month actually after purchasing them, provided that they’re in good shape once
you get them and to do this you want to store them between 41 degrees and 46 degrees in
your fridge. So actually I have a fridge that’s actually
set at like 44 degrees and that’s the fridge these cactus fruits are going into, so they’re
going to definitely last maybe up to a month. Alright so that’s the trunk, let’s go
around to the side and see what we got inside the car. Alright let’s check out what else I got
on this produce haul, alright so in the car we got lots of stuff here. So I just got a few random artichokes here,
I want to encourage you guys to eat them, even if you eat raw, to eat some artichokes. Artichokes are one of the most nutrient dense
foods you guys could be eating and yes you can eat them raw, no cooking required just
eat them as you would eat them if they were cooked and I would encourage you guys -especially-
eat the artichoke hearts. I love that, it’s one of my favorite things,
actually I bought these cause, 8 artichokes were like 2 bucks and basically I’m just
going to go ahead and pickle all the hearts in just a salt water brine solution to see
what my home pickled artichoke hearts are going to taste like, cause that was one of
my favorite things before I was raw. Anyways let’s see what else we got, we got
some tomatoes. So we got campari tomatoes, they were 1 dollar
each for 1 pound each for ‘Winset Campari Greenhouse Grown’ and that’s the kind
I like to eat when they’re out of season in my garden, some of you guys are wondering,
“John, how do you store your tomatoes?” So actually I store my tomatoes out of the
fridge in my arid dry climate where inside the house is somewhere around 60 degrees,
these guys will easily store –depending on the shape they’re in when I get them-
easily a month, no problem whatsoever. That being said you don’t want to store
your tomatoes under 55 degrees, because then you’ll get some damage to the tomatoes,
you may lose flavor, all this kind of stuff, so actually I’ll encourage you guys to leave
your tomatoes out on the counter and make sure if there’s are any damages or holes
or anything in there, use those ones first; you want to try the keep the ones intact and
also I find if they have still the green stems on them and whatnot it’ll even last a bit
longer. Alright, next we got some cucumbers, this
is 22 pounds of ‘Baja Organics Persian Cucumbers’ my favorite little cucumbers to eat, these
are what they look like and these guys have a none bitter skin and these guys were 22
pounds for 20 bucks today: And to store your cucumbers you want to store them optimally
between 50 and 54 degrees, that’s going to keep them in pretty good shape without
in kind of damage to them. I know a lot of you guys may store them at
a lower colder temperature, it’s not optimal and while you could do that with all the things
that I’m talking about today, I’m interested in storing things as close as I can to the
optimal temperatures that I’m sharing with you guys to lengthen, or maximize the time
that they can be stored. If you go out of these bounds try to get them
as close as possible to that, so then you’re going to minimize the damage which is actually
going to shorten their shelf life. The cucumbers for me have been more challenging
to store than some of the things I’ve showed you guys up till this point, but I should
be able to get like easily 2 to 3 weeks out of these cucumbers and no problem once we
start juicing them, we’ll throw them in the juice and we’ll be through them in no
time at all. Alright next case coming out, we got a whole
case right there ‘Premium Organic Del Monte Bananas’ 40 pounds, 9 dollars this time
at the wholesale produce terminal. I got some of these this time specifically
that were kind of more greenish, so they’re going to last a little bit longer and optimally
for your bananas, I never store these guys in the fridge; I store these out of the fridge,
the optimal storage temperature for bananas are between like 56 to 58 degrees. They are a tropical fruit and if you put them
in the fridge -you’ve all done that before- the skin kind of gets grey and all kind of
funny and especially this time of year when it’s cold in many parts of the country,
you may go to the store and see that greyish looking banana and that’s cause of cold
damage and sometimes the bananas don’t really recover from the cold damage and they don’t
quite taste the same, so I do encourage you guys to avoid those if you guys see them. But you know do the best you can, once these
guys ripen up instead of putting them in the fridge, I just basically peel them and they
go in the freezer and then I end up using these guys for the smoothies. But, the other thing I wanted to say is besides
your refrigerator where you store your food which usually has a single preset temperature
and you can adjust that depending on what you have in there or whatnot, you could also
store food in other parts of your home, so if you have like a root cellar. You know a root cellar has a nice mild temperature
and that’d be a good place to store many fruits and vegetables, maybe your garage,
something like that also may have a cooler temperatures to better allow you to store
the fruits and vegetables at their proper temperature. Alright next case coming out for you guys,
we got a whole case right here, these are ‘Heritage Beef Steak Tomatoes’ these guys
are beautiful, look at them and they’re like nice deep and red and they’re heritage,
so they’re like heirloom. I think this is like 12 pounds and once again
optimal temperature to store these guys 54 to 56 degrees, if you find things at the produce
terminal and often times it says it actually right there on the side of the box. For me these guys actually get stored outside
the fridge, the fridge is just way to cold and once again you know, tomatoes like this
they’ll store easily for a month. Alright what we got coming out next is we
got one whole case of lettuce. I got a lot of lettuce in my garden but I
couldn’t resist the price on these guys, this is basically ‘Organic Romaine Hearts’
3 packs and there are 12-3 packs total and guess how much it was? 6 bucks, that’s 50 cents a 3 pack for organic
romaine, I mean at this price I don’t care if I juice them cut them into salads or whatever,
they’re really a simple meal and to store these guys, they are best stored at like 32
degrees and they’ll last a couple weeks, easily in your fridge provided you get them
in good shape. Most valuable thing I got this trip for the
plants anyways was my tree collards, I got 16 tree collards. These guys basically will grow for years and
provide me endless amounts of collard greens, I want to encourage you guys once again, grow
your own food. Whether you got a balcony or inside an apartment
grow sprouts and micro-greens, if you got a balcony, live in Southern California and
you want to grow the tree collards for sure one of the best investments you guys could
make. Alright next thing we got coming out: I got
the Swiss Chard so you know these Swiss chards are actually a nice size already harvestable,
but these will go in the garden and literally will grow for a year and I won’t have to
buy any Swiss chard because I’m growing these plants. So I mean instead of spending money and having
to go to the produce that you buy and eat, you have the plants you could just actually
harvest the outer leaves of the plants and continue to eat from it, eat from it, eat
from it so literally just a one-time investment can literally feed you for a year and if you
buy and invest in fruit trees they could literally feed you for a life time. Next produce item coming out right here check
it out man these guys are special: What I got here is I got some carrots, these are
purple carrots I want to encourage you guys to eat purple carrots whether you’re eating
them, shredding them up, or like I’ll be doing juicing them. They are much more higher in anthocyanins
than the standard orange carrots and because of that I paid like I think maybe four times
as much I can get the ‘Organic Bunny Love’ carrots at ‘Costco’ for like 50 cents
a pound. I paid 2 dollars a pound from a farmer who
actually watches my videos which is kind of fun, so I can have nutrients, anthocyanins
that are minimum or probably like at least 20 times more nutritious than the orange carrots
by getting these purple ones , so that’s definitely a better buy in my opinion. Now, to store the carrots these guys are meant
for storage, they’re best stored in the ground of course, if you’re growing them,
but I’ll be storing these in the fridge in a plastic bag you don’t want to let the
air in or whatever and they’ll store at 32 degrees easily for a month, but I’ll
be juicing these guys up. Next coming out we got this box right here,
let me see if I can get the lid off for you, we got Minneola Tangelos. This is a nice heavy box man this is like
40 pounds –that’s how I get my workout- anyways these Minneola’s will store in the
fridge no problem whatsoever, although they are best stored at like 55 degrees, that’s
optimal. But even if you lower temperatures, I’ll
probably put it into my fridge just at 45 degrees, they’re going to store for several
weeks no problem and these guys will just get turned into juice, we’ll be able to
drink that up fast and quick, we got actually two cases of these, 40 pounds for like 13
bucks, that’s an amazing deal. So we’re getting down to the end of the
produce in the haul today, so let’s see in my cooler bag here got a couple of things:
We got some cabbage here and cabbage once again you know is a cold crop, anti-cancer,
also we got the purple, deep purple and got this at the farmers market they were like
2 dollars for a nice size organic cabbage. These guys will easily store a month no problem,
32 degrees in your fridge, we’ve been juicing a lot of these and they’re a really nice
mellow flavor, also very high in anthocyanins, due to the nice deep pigments, plus they’re
anti-cancer and they’re actually featured in my weight loss juice, I’ll put a link
down below if I remember to, but you want to check out my weight loss juice recipe includes
the cabbage as well as the cucumbers and a whole bunch of other things, so you could
speed up your weight loss and also improve your health. Alright next inside this bag we got a bunch
of lemons, these are just not any lemons these are known as the Meyer lemons and I got like
20 of them, they’re going to last a while; and actually the lemons could last up to 6
months in the fridge –believe it or not- if they’re stored at the proper temperature
between 45 and 54 degrees, I’ve had them stored easily for 3, 4 months no problem whatsoever. I mean think about it, lemons are popular
because they contain citric acid, citric acid is a natural preservative, they’re built
into the lemons. So just store them right they’re going to
last a long time for you and so I tried to buy them on sale, we’ll make lemon dressings
with these, throw them into juices, all kinds of good stuff, lemons are always valuable. Aright next thing coming out we got some ‘Organic
Valencia Oranges’ naval season is upon us now but I got the Valencia’s because they’re
better for juicing in my juice press where I can just juice them up really fast. 13 dollars for 25 pounds at the farmers market,
oranges are best stored between like 32 and 40 degrees, and I’ve had them store easily
for a month once again just like the lemons they have the citric acid that’s going to
help you guys out and of course I also do encourage you guys before storing them and
while they are in storage, you know go through them every once and a while and look: And
there may be 1 or 2 you might pull out that’s kind of moldy or bad, and I just cut off half
of it and use the other half and you got to keep the mold from spreading. So you got to always check out your produce
and give it a once over and see what you need to eat and use it as quickly as you can. Last case coming out right here, got a case
of organic ‘Sun Kiss Mandarin Tangerines’ look at these beauties with the greens on
and everything, these guys are super fresh, these weren’t sold by weight I don’t know
what these guys weigh, I’m going to guess maybe like 20 pounds on these guys, that’s
20 pounds for 13 bucks, an amazing deal for these guys and these guys should be stored
no colder than like 55 degrees. I’ll probably put them in my fridge at 45
degrees and even then they’ll last a couple of weeks without any issues. Okay I think I only got like one last item
I want to share with you guys that’s still in the car. Alright last thing coming out the car tonight
, I mean it’s in the thermal electric cooler, be sure to check my previous episode on how
I travel raw to learn about my thermal electric cooler and what you guys see is right in here. This is the juice man, this is the sugarcane
lemon ginger juice and these guys actually highly perishable, way more perishable than
any of the fruits I got, I like to stores these at like 34 to 36 degrees maybe even
down to 32, cold as possible and even then you know they’ll last maybe like a maximum
of 3 days, before they start to actually oxidize and actually ferment on their own. So yea we’re going to be drinking these
really soon actually, I’m getting kind of thirsty after filming this video. Anyways I got to get the rest of this stuff
in, we’re going to come back at you with a few more tips and tricks so you can guys
can maximize your produce storage at home with my special tips. So, now I’m inside my house and you guys
can see here’s 2 of my refrigerators, I got one more in the main kitchen, this off to
the room off the side and my 3 refrigerators where I keep all my food. Now I don’t just have all my refrigerators
set to the same temperature cause as you guys learned some produce items don’t like it
too cold, they like it a little bit warmer, so in this part I’m going to share with
you guys actually the different temperatures I have in my fridges and how you can even
store things above the preset temperatures that you could set inside you fridge. So this is like the fridge that came with
my house, I really don’t like it because it’s not energy efficient but hey, it came
with the house and until I find something cheaper and better this is what I got, or
until it breaks actually and so this guys is one of the like double doors, I don’t
really like that so much -the side by sides- but anyways inside this refrigerator you guys
can see I got lots of stuff. I got jack fruit in there, I don’t know,
coconuts, all kinds of stuff, I don’t know anyways what I got in each of my refrigerators
is one of these guys, this is a little thermometer on ‘Amazon’ I think they’re under 10
bucks, you can get them on ‘eBay’ for even less. They seem to be fairly accurate, I got like
4 of these and they’re all within like point-one degree of each other, so that’s definitely
good to know, but yea inside this fridge its 41.5 degrees so this is not the super cold
fridge, actually my other fridge maybe a little bit warmer but this one’s even a little
bit colder because you know more tropical-ish fruits don’t like it too cold but some other
things like it really cold and just by dropping the temperature a few degrees you can massively
increase the length that you can store some of your fruits and vegetables. So like I’ve been doing I encourage you
guys to play around with the storage temps as much as I quoted different storage temps
a little bit earlier, I found that even going out of the bounds of what they’re recommending
even works a little bit better. Anyways lets go ahead and head into the white
fridge and show you guys what we got. So the first thing I want to say about my
white fridge is I picked this up on ‘Craig’s List’ it was like 80 or 100 bucks, I mean
they like didn’t need it anymore and this is not a fridge-freezer combo, this is 100%
fridge and this is what I would recommend for you guys, cause it really massively gives
you more space to store things in the fridge, You know, I don’t really store a whole lot
of stuff in the freezers, most of my food is in the fridge unless it’s going ripe
and I need to freeze it or something like that to store for later; I think some of the
bananas from this last load are going to get frozen. But, I like the fridge only fridges and anyways
the handle broke off on this so I just kind of like open it like this. I want to show you guys what’s inside: So
inside here it’s like totally full, we got coconuts up on top, we got cases of blueberries,
we got sugarcane juice sitting in here, we got apples, we got some peppers, got the cactus
fruits we got to use ASAP cause they’re kind of damaged, got some grapes, got some
romaine hearts. But anyways I wanted to show you guys this
here, the thermostat in this fridge is 32.9 so I try to keep this above 32, I don’t
want stuff freezing inside here, but I want this super cold, especially for the juices. I mean you saw the other fridge that’s like
8 degrees warmer like around 40, I want things at their lowest temperature; that’s going
to prevent the bacteria form growing as quickly and things from fermenting as quickly, because
everything slows down when its colder. Likewise my blueberries, one of the most expensive
things I’ve purchased this last load, I got them in here so that I can keep them for
a nice good long time and those blueberries probably will store easily for 2 weeks, though
I’m probably going to eat them within a week, cause tomorrow half this case is going
to be gone. Lauren and I actually finished I think the
first case the first day we got them and the other thing I want to mention while I’m
in here is these guys right here, now I have two of these guys in here, you know if you
guys have been watching my videos for a while you guys saw my Christmas episode this in
one of the devices I recommend, this is known as a ‘Berry Breeze’. Actually the cheapest place to get these is
on ‘Amazon’ I think when they originally came out they were like 50 bucks, then they
went down to 30, then they went down to like 20 and then on ‘Amazon’ they’re clearance-ing
them out cause I guess there’s a new model coming out or something I don’t know, but
probably like under 15 dollars if I remember I’ll put a link down below this video. You see the little light flashing there, this
unit produces activated oxygen which basically will kill the bacteria and mold and all that
kind of stuff, so this ensures if you got your food at the right temperature and you’re
killing all the mold, the mold won’t be able to grow or its going to grow significantly
slower, that’s means your food’s going to last longer. So I have 2 of these guys I use to have 1
but I’m like, “Man I want to double up I want to make sure my food stays fresh for
longer,” and for a minimal investment I definitely think it’s worth it, doing this
may help to counteract some of the Ethylene that’s let off by the fruit ripening process,
this doesn’t work so good on leafy greens. Leafy greens will still go bad pretty quick,
but this really helps out with the fruits and especially the berries. I got that guy in there, but yea so this is
my cold fridge but actually just with the door open its up to 38 so I got to close the
door man. So this is the last fridge I have in my house,
this is actually my French door fridge, stainless steel, this is the kind of fridge that I like
the most and would recommend you guys to get if you’re going to get just one fridge. Because of the French doors it has actually
a lot more space than the side by sides and it has a drawer on the bottom for frozen foods. And this is computer controlled so I like
that a lot, you can just press the button and you can see the temperature that its set
at, I have this set for 38 and although its set for 38, inside the thermometer reads likes
40 degrees, I mean this isn’t quite as accurate but you could set this just easily with the
little up and down arrows and the other two fridges I have, actually have dial controls
and the dial control doesn’t tell you what you’re setting it at, so that’s why I
have a thermometer in there, it’s very important to know where you’re at. But, anyways this one goes up to a maximum
of 47 degrees, we’re going to set mine back down to 38 and most fridges will probably
go between that range, around 30s to like maybe if you’re lucky up to 50, but mostly
they try to stay in the 40s cause most times fridges you don’t want things too warm actually
because it spoils very fast. The exception is certain tropical fruits and
other fruits you know that don’t like it too cold, some of the vegetables do like it
cold, but some of the tropical fruits can be difficult to store cause if you leave it
out in ambient air temperatures it may expire and go bad fast, if it’s too cold you’re
going to get some damage to it, so you got to have it at just right temperature. So now I’m going to show you guys the last
method that I use in my home to store my food at proper temperature. So now I want to share with you guys the last
way that I store my produce in my house and it’s with this guy right here and for those
of you guys who have been watching me before know this is known as the ‘Thermal Electric
Cooler’ you know I travel with it, it works in the car as well as I have the home adapter
sitting over on this side right here so I can plug it into the wall and it works great. Now, the challenge with the ‘Thermal Electric
Cooler’ is that you cannot set the temperature on it. The temperature on the ‘Thermal Electric
Cooler’ is 32 degrees below the ambient temperature in your room, so this means that’s
if you’re like below 60 degrees, the temperature inside here is going to be freezing and it’s
going to be cold and that’s not going to be good for you produce, so the way I’m
able to control the temperature in this ‘Thermal Electric Cooler’ or even a refrigerator
that doesn’t get down too low –although if your fridge has a freezer you will not
want to do this so it probably works best with one of the dedicated fridges that I have
or even the chest freezer- you could actually use this device to ensure that it does not
get too cold in there and maintain a temperature that you want that’s perfect your fruits
and vegetables that you’re storing specifically. So what I have here is a little temperature
controller, this is called a ‘Baylight’ if I remember I’ll put a link down below
to ‘Amazon’ where I bought this and basically this has 2 plugs: One for heating, one for
cooling, I’m using actually only for the cooling. You could use it for heating too but that’s
beyond the scope of this video, but anyways what this unit does is, it has a temperature
probe that comes out, that’s actually in my cooler here and aside from the temperature
probe that’s down in the bottom, I have also one of those handy thermometers in there
so inside here is 50 degrees, so I’m keeping this a lot warmer than any of my fridges because
the peppers don’t like to be stored to cold, below 45 degrees which all my fridge are,
they’re going to receive some damage and if you store them too warm like just ambient
room temperature than they’re going to expire faster. I want to be able to eat my food and keep
it at a proper temperature as long as I can until I’m ready to use it without having
it to spoil, without having it to go bad, without having it moldy, so very important. So anyways you set this for the desired temperature
so the desired temperature is on the bottom, its 46 degrees and then you set a differential. So my set temperature is 46 degrees and if
it gets 4 degrees warmer than that –or 3 or 4 degrees warmer than that- than the unit
kicks on, it turns on this power so the ‘Thermal Electric Cooler’ can run and when it gets
down to the proper temperature then it shuts off and then this is pretty well insulated
so then it won’t run for hours and then as the temperature creeps up this little unit
sense the temperatures not in range and then it kicks it back on. So in this way you can control the ‘Thermal
Electric Cooler’, ‘Chest Freezer’ or even ‘Dedicated Fridge’ to keep at the
temperature you want to store your fruits and vegetables at the proper temperature so
that they could stay freshest the longest without damage. So I know you might be thinking, “John,
how do you know all the different temperatures to store the fruits and vegetables and where
can I get the list that tells me where to get it?” So you know on many produce boxes that I buy
at the ‘Wholesale Produce Terminal’ that you’ll never see if you’re just buying
retail, it says, ‘Store between these two temperatures,” and those are temperatures
that are guidelines put out by the USDA, luckily I found a USDA document or book, its over
500 pages that goes over all the different fruits and vegetables, you know how much ethylene,
how fast they respirate and the storage temperatures, post-harvest practices, all this kind of stuff
and its actually right here, it’s actually called ‘The Commercial Storage of Fruits,
Vegetables, and Florist and Nursery Stocks’ ‘Agricultural Handbook Number 66 Revised
February 2016 put out by the USDA’ so you know that’s what I got a lot of the specs
for this video today and I found that in general these are pretty good guidelines to follow
but in some cases I tweak them a little bit, so anyways there’s many different parts if
this book here and I just printed out the ones with the peppers here and basically it’ll
tell you the scientific name and introduction, it’ll talk to you about some of the different
varieties, how to eat the peppers, I mean it’s just definitely really good, and I
think that too many raw fooders don’t know intricately and are familiar with all the
different fruits and vegetables and a list of it should be required reading, you know
if you’re really into this stuff to get to know them and how to pick out a good one,
it talked about quality characteristics and criteria, [unintelligible 00:38:20] culture
and maturity into seeds, grade sizing and packaging, precooling conditions –so like
before they’re cooled once out the field what do they do to them-, optimal storage
conditions, controlled atmosphere considerations, retail outlet, display considerations, chilling
sensitivity, ethylene production and sensitivity, respiration rates, physiological disorders,
post-harvest pathology, quarantine issues, sustainability of fresh cut product, special
considerations, I mean there’s lots of info in here man. I mean the text, it’s kind of dry you know
but it’s really packed with information and of course there’s references and further
reading with all kinds of different studies that links to all the information that’s
in here. So anyways I most concerned with optimal storage
conditions and the chilling sensitivity and it says, “Chilling sensitivity-peppers are
sensitive to chilling injury when stored below 45 degrees, symptoms include surface pitting,
water soaked areas, decay, and discoloration of the seed cavity. Symptoms can appear after a few days at 32
degrees and a few weeks at 41 degrees. Sensitivity varies with cultivar, ripe colored
peppers are less chilling sensitive than green peppers.” Actually that would make sense to me because
the colored peppers are less chilling sensitive than the green peppers because they have more
anti-oxidants to protect themselves from different problems or forces such as chilling. Anyways so it says, “A few weeks at 41 degrees–“
Anyways I’ve got pitting on some of my peppers when I’ve stored them in other fridges before,
anyways so knowing this we should never store our peppers below 45, that being said if you
have a whole fridge full of other fruits and your peppers don’t like to be 45 but then
your berries to keep them longer they need to be at 32 or your lettuce needs to be at
32, you got some issues. So you might want to store them in there for
just a few days or have a couple fridges and different temperatures like I do. And then over here it says, ‘Optimal Storage
Conditions-Fresh peppers can be kept for 2 to 3 weeks at 45 degrees with 90 to 95% humidity. Storage life can be extended another week
by packing in moisture retentive films between 45 to 50 degrees.” So actually these peppers came in a moisture
retentive film, I took that off and let’s see here –so anyways it basically just talks
about the different temperatures you want to store them so then following these guidelines,
it’s not rocket science. So I have this you know I don’t want it
to even get below 45 degrees, so I have this set between 46 and I think 48 is where it’s
supposed to be and above that it kicks on, so this controller is very sensitive to keeping
your exact temperatures. So doing that I should be able to get my peppers
easily for 2 to 3 weeks and then if I threw in one of those ‘Berry Breezes’ in here
–which actually I don’t currently have that might even extend it by another week
or something. So I mean these are some of the techniques
I use to store my produce, I think it’s sad that no other raw foodists talks about
this, you know that I’m aware of to the extent that I do and I just make these videos
for you guys to help you guys so you guys can do the best you can whether you’re storing
your produce or whether you’re eating a raw foods diet, you know I’ve had to learn
a lot of these different things over the last 22 years I’ve been doing this now and I
simply share that with you guys so I would encourage you guys to share this video with
others that you guys could think would help, also be sure to click that subscribe button
to be notified with my new and upcoming episodes; you never know what kind of information that
could help you out to eat, and store, and why fruits and vegetables are so good for
you. And also be sure to check my past episodes,
my past episodes are a wealth of knowledge sharing with you guys some the things that
I’ve learned along my raw food journey and finally be sure to like this video. If you liked this video, liked all the tips
you got in this video that was helpful for you like it, if I got enough likes man I’ll
go more into depth into storage and how I do it, cause I mean this just kind of scratches
the tip of the iceberg on how I store stuff and I could go even a lot further and yea
that’s pretty much it. I’m just sharing my life, sharing what I
do on a daily basis, if I buying food, hey you guys get a video on buying food, if I’m
you know storing food you get a video on storing food. Anyways I have fun hope you guys had fun watching
this as well and I guess with that my name is John Kohler with ‘OkRaw.com’ we’ll
see you next time and until then remember: Keep eating your fresh fruits and vegetables,
they’re always the best.