Best Hot Pepper to Overwinter that Fruits in Cold Weather

Best Hot Pepper to Overwinter that Fruits in Cold Weather


Alright, this is John Kohler with growingyourgreens.com
to give you another exciting episode for you, I’m here in my front yard garden and it
is now December time and finally I’m just pulling out my peppers and cucumbers… well,
what’s left of the cucumbers. I’ve already started pulling out the tomatoes
since they have not already been productive, but what I thought I’d share with you guys
in this episode is the number one pepper plant you guys want to dig up and actually overwinter,
in a greenhouse or indoors, that will produce even throughout the winter time. In my climate here I could just put it in
an unheated greenhouse and it would still thrive and make a brilliant amount of peppers
for me to eat. Now they are quite hot but there’s still
some pepers that are going to really do well in the winter. Anyway, let’s go head in for a quick mini
tour just on our way for the peppers and I’ll show you guys the special pepper plant that
I’m digging up. So here, even in December check it out, like
this is the Bolivian cucumbers and this guy is still viding out, still producing tons
flowers and even little fruits around here, if I look I could find a fruit. Here is one, here is a whole bunch, still
making these amazing fruits. And I still do have some seeds left so you’re
looking at the probably most hearty cucumber even though it’s been dipping down in like
mid thirties, hasn’t gotten to freezing yet even, maybe it’s the upcoming week,
once it freezes these guys for a toast, but even in a little high thirties, mid thirties,
this guy is still producing these little mini cucumbers. Really good, especially in December. Go ahead and head on in. Those cucumbers can get really rambunctious
here, as you guys can see I got all these vines that are growing like wild and even
more cucumbers. But yeah, these guys are still thriving whereas
my other cucumbers over here are finished for the season. So let’s head in and over this fruits bed,
this over here used to be peppers right here, as you guys can see it’s turning to dirt,
I leveled it out and I’m getting all ready to plant new fall and winter crops in there. This next bed basically was peppers on the
side and cucumbers at the middle and the cucumbers are pretty much finished, and then this other
bed here, this was another bed of peppers that I harvested already and we got it replanted
into lettuce and garlic. Here’s some other random… family plants
and purple cauliflower. Anyways, this is what I really wanted to show
you guys. Over here, my next peper bed over here, in
this bed I planted some special pepers. Check it out, here is one of my cucumbers
that are left, they are kind of getting messed up now, they are still edible, I’ve been
juicing these guys. But yeah I mean, nothing like the Bolivian
cucumbers still producing when these guys are just like you can see the vine toasted
out. So I really like how in nature different plants
finish at different times, so once it starts getting cold pretty much my… artichoke,
they got to be cut down, they don’t really like the cold, my cucumbers are next, then
the tomatoes are next and then finally the pepers. And some pepers fair better than others and
that’s what I’m going to show you guys. Check it out like these pepers, these are
maybe long Italians, they are still hanging on even though we’re in mid thirties in
the evenings, days right now in the sixties. You know, nice long Italian peper. But these guys, once it gets pretty cold they
are not going to make it and I do not recommend growing large pepers if you’re overwintering
them, in the winter they need a lot of sun and whatnot and nice weather to produce nice
large pepers like this. Likely this is for mostly when it’s warmer
and not just finally wrapping it up. Now if you do want to grow the pepers over
winter then I would recommend maybe like a Serrano peper or even smaller pepers in that
but I have a special variety that I want to introduce you guys that I have had videos
on in the past. So now I want to show you guys the pepper
plant that I will be saving and overwintering in my unheated greenhouse in my zone nine,
so it’s this guy right here, this is known as the Monsanto peper, also known as rocoto
peper. They come in a few different colors, they
come in yellow, red and orange and they are really nice pepers, even despite the mid thirties
we’ve been into. Now, doesn’t like the frost, maybe if it
gets down to thirty two for an hour or two it would probably be alright, because this
peper plant is from south America in the altitudes where it’s used to actually staying cold
for a long period of time and that’s what really does well. In the desert garden where there is a hundred
degrees plus these plants do not like it, they like it cooler so if you live in like
the coast of Oregon or someplace where it’s kind of cooler, especially in the evenings
because pepers generally like it hot in the evenings, this is the baby for you that is
going to produce some nice fairly hot pepers actually. If I remember, I’m going to put a link down
below to the video where actually I tasted these pepers that are overwintered in my garden,
I think I had a right pepers in maybe like January which is really cool and I try a peper
for the first time in camera and man, that thing lit up my mouth, it’s actually a quite
funny episode just to think about and then actually even to watch. But yeah, these guys even despite the mid
thirties it’s still flowering so you guys can see some of that beautiful purple flowers
right there, and I mean it still has lots of flowers, this is when it flowers, when
the nights are cooler, it doesn’t make fruits for most of the summer until it starts to
cool down in the evenings and the days are cooler also. In addition, we got some fruits that are ready
despite it’s still going in the flowers, wanting to produce more fruit we got some
nice fruits here and we’re going to show you guys some of the nice bell pepper shaped
fruits right there on the screen. Now these are unripe fruit. Now you can harvest your peppers green… I always encourage you guys to harvest your
pepers at full color, at full rightness. Once again it gives you red, orange or yellow, I’m
not sure which variety this is because I didn’t didnt label it. So what I’m going to do now is actually
just to dig up all the non Manzano peppers in this bed and then have room to dig these
guys up and put them into a nice five gallon or even larger sized pots and then we’re
going to go ahead and pull them in the greenhouse for the winter. So I’m going to get doing that, we’ll
come back at you when I got them all potted up. Alright, so as you guys can see I got a bed
cleared out here and what I’m going to do now is actually potting up my Monsanto peppers
in about five gallon pots, the bigger the pot size the better, this is all like kind
of hanging around. I think I got kind of like one spare of fifteen
gallon that are pot of this special plan that I’m into, but they are going into this size. So for overwintering there is two main reasons
why you might want to do it, and number one reason is just to keep the plants alive over
the winter, and maybe not have it produce fruits for you so that next season you can
actually plant alive roots that’s already a nice big mass in the garden and have it
sprout up and you’ll get peppers sooner rather than later the next season. I’m doing it a bit differently, I’m going
to let it just continue to grow and continue to make peppers for me in my greenhouse. If you’re doing the former, you may want
to turn the plant back massively to minimize the amount of growth on there because moving
a plant out of a raised bed works nice and happy into a five gallon pot, definitely going
to be some transplant shock. I’ll show you guys how to minimize the transplant
shock by trying to dig up the biggest root up possible and I’ll show you guys my specific
technique to do it over the next one I’m digging up. Now I’m ready to pot this Monsanto Pepper
into one of the five gallon pots, so here’s a few tips for you. Number one, you want to have two pots ready,
you’re probably thinking John this is only going into one pot, why do you need two pots? You’re right, so you want one pot that is
probably filled with a good potting soil mixer and it’s going to drain well, not going
to retain much water, peppers don’t like it too wet, actually up to the soil level
where you think you’re going to pull out the big root ball the root ball is probably going
to go down almost halfway into this and then I’ll set it on top of some new potting soil
so that new roots can grow down into, so that’s what you want to have available, this is the
donor pot and then of course you want to have a secondary pot with just potting soil because
I want you to pull out the rool ball it is not going to fit the other pot completely, so we’re
going to take some of the stuff out of here and just fill it in around the edges. So to do this since I’m using smaller pots,
I’m not going to use a full size shovel, plus it’s just going to get really big and
awkward to deal with unless you’re transplanting into a fifteen gallon or larger size pot. I got this handy dandy shovel, it’s a Craftsman
but like a mini shovel, I find this perfect for doing transplants and doing a lot of things
around the garden. I think I got it on sale for like five or
ten bucks, definitely a really good investment. So we’re going to come around the base of
the plant and I kind of like to take this circumference of the pot and kind of basically
carve out with my shovel you know, just a circle around the plant about the same size. You want to make this as wide as possible
because you want to get the most root ball as possible in the pot, this is going to ensure
the plant has the least amount of transplant shock, the less roots you can actually cut
off and damage, the higher probability of success you’re going to have. So we’re going to go ahead and pull this
ripple and go back and maybe go ahead and dig in here, and ease my foot here and shove
that in the ground and straight down and wiggle it back and forth, pull the ground down, come
up and then we make our circle going around. Wiggle back and forth, hold the ground, pull
it up… this is not rocket science, anybody could do it. Worst thing that could happen if you don’t
do it right and then you’ll learn how to do it better is the plant won’t make it,
no big deal. That’s why I’m doing eleven of these,
I’m sure a good percentage will make it. Alright, put it down… alright, we’re halfway
of our full circle here, alright coming up, I think we have one more to complete our circle
approximately. So now you guys want to take up your shovel
and put it down there, put it down as deep as you can, even deeper than it was before,
rock it down and then we’re going to get our transplant pot ready. And then we’re basically going to pivot
this up you know, use leverage, I learned about that in grade school. Alright, leverage it up and once we got this
big thing out, I kind of hold it on the shovel and then I kind of carefully make sure it
has the appropriate height for all the soil in there and then kind of maybe scoot this
back and then I very carefully place it with the shovel into the pot and don’t remove
the shovel yet, what we’re going to do is we’re going to use the secondary pot of
soil, grab a handful of soil and we’re going to fill around the edges. And we’re going to push the soil around
the edges and use to fill up all the nooks and crannies, and also that’s why you don’t
remove the shovel yet because what we’re going to do is I’m going to take the soil
and put it behind the shovel because if I just let the shovel go then all the soil is
going to fill the pot, so we’re going to go ahead and fill this up. Alright so now we got the soil in and we’re
going to go ahead and remove the shovel, then I like to give the pot shakedown , shake it
down. This is to basically set all the soil into
the pot. The other thing you want to remember when
transplanting in most cases, not all, is you want to keep the level soil that was the original
plant at the same level, so like if the plant comes up to here, don’t overspill it to
here. In the case of peppers I could do it, with
the tomatoes you could do that, but I like to keep them at the same level. Some plants are sensitive and even if you
fill them a little too high, then you’re going to get a stammer on. So we’re going to go ahead and put this
in, shake it down and then I like to push in around the edges before I fill in. And I always like to leave a little bit of
gap between the ledge or the edge of the pot and the soil level, because if you fill it
with the soil too high and then water it, it’s going to overflow, so I like to give
it a good inch. But not too much, because if you leave too
much space you’re missing out on soil you could have where the roots could be growing. Alright, so I think this guy is done, I’ve
got about another nine to go and I might come back at you when I’m finished. So as you guys can see, got all eleven of
these guys potted up, actually finished the last up when it was getting dark so I thought
I’d finish this video for you guys today. I potted these guys up, after I got them into
pots I watered them, that’s very important, I watered them after I put them into pots
and the next morning you’ll notice some of the leaves are kind of droopy on these
guys, some are more droopy than others, some are actually not really affected, but this
is normal after transplant, the plant has literally been picked up and moved. If you picked up all your stuff and moved
in one night, you’d be a bit fragile too, right? So don’t worry if your plants look like
this, hopefully some will come back and some of them may not, and if they don’t come
back that’s alright because you know what? I’ve got extras. And I always want you guys to plant insurance,
you know? Plant two or three of the same kind of plant
just to make sure that you will be able to keep those genetics. If you’re transplanting, transplant a couple,
transplant an extra one just in case, you can always have too much than too few, that’s
a lesson I learned with having a brother. So if you guys enjoyed this episode, learning
about what pepper plant I’m overwintering and why, please make sure you give a thumbs
up, also make sure to share this with somebody that is trying to overwinter their peppers. This is the one that I like the best for cool
weather, also this is good for people that grow in cool weather and want some hot peppers
that don’t generally produce if it’s not hot enough out. Also be sure to check my past episodes, my
past episodes are about 12 now on this YouTube channel. Be sure to hit that subscribe button down
below to know about my new upcoming video that is coming up in three to four days, you
never know when I’ll show up, what you’ll be learning on my YouTube channel. So once again my name is John Kohler with
growingyourgreens.com, we’ll see you next time. Until then remember, keep on growing.