Active Living and Healthy Eating on a Budget

Active Living and Healthy Eating on a Budget


ECHO TV is a co-production of Minnesota’s
emergency community and health outreach
collaborative of health, safety emergency preparedness, ethnic and
non-profit agencies, and TPT Minnesota’s channel. Hello and welcome to ECHO, which means
emergency, community, health and outreach. This program
provides information about health, safety, emergency and civic
topics for audiences who have a limited knowledge of English. In an emergency this TV station will provide information
about the community to keep you safe and healthy. I’m your
host, Calvin Worthen. Our topic on ECHO TV is about active living and healthy
eating on a budget. In a few moments we will talk with expert’s
on this important subject, but first ECHO would
like you to watch this message about our topic. We’d all like to be as
healthy as possible, but it’s not always easy. For most of us
being healthy is something we have to work towards. That means regular exercise and being
active as much as possible, taking the stairs instead of the
elevator, riding a bike or walking instead of driving a car, not smoking and limiting how much
alcohol we drink for a healthier life and eating healthy foods. Eating healthy meals takes time and
planning, some people worry that it might cost too much, yet isn’t our health worth much more.
Sometimes more affordable foods are high in fat sodium and sugar. Advertising may make
those foods look good, but they can make you gain weight
because so many of them have lots of calories and are high in fat. To eat healthy, we
need to start buying healthy food and preparing healthy meals. Even if we don’t have a lot of money to
spend on food, there are ways to make the most of what
we can spend, and their are programs to help us learn how to buy healthy food. And how to prepare healthy meals that
don’t cost very much. The Simply Good Eating program teaches individuals and
families what they need to know to maintain healthy diets and keep active. Simply Good Eating and other programs like it, offer classes
where individuals and families who qualify can learn things like how to make
healthy meals that don’t cost a lot and how to stay physically active. The
classes are held at convenient places like community centers, or food shelves. These classes can show
us healthy ways to make our traditional favorites. It’s so important for everyone to make
healthy food choices. People who eat well, do better at work,
school or play. Older people who eat well stay in their
homes longer and have lower medical bills. The better we eat, the better we feel and
we enjoy life even more. If we don’t eat a healthy diet, there’s
a greater chance we can get certain diseases. By establishing healthy eating habits, we
make it less likely that we’ll get those diseases. So make the effort to eat better,
exercise more and make the best at what we can spend
on food. It will help. Your watching ECHO, a program designed to provide information about health, safety,
emergency and civic topics for audiences who have
limited knowledge of English. We are talking about active living and
healthy eating on a budget. To help us learn more, I would like to
introduce our guest. This is and Angie Thornhill who is a Community Nutrition Educator from the University of Minnesota Extension, and this is Roxanne Johnson who is a
Public Health Nutritionist and Certified Diabetes Educator in
Indian services. Welcome to ECHO. So, first I would like to start off with the question to Roxanne, what
is healthy eating? Well, I get asked that question every day from people since I’m a nutritionist,
but basically, you know, we need to start thinking of food as medicine, instead of, you know, our
preferences for what we like to eat, based on our, you
know, foods that are salty or sweet, or high in fat, so we need to have
the right balance of foods that we’re choosing. When you say balance, you are talking like color or portion? Yes, exactly, the types of foods
that we choose is very important for our bodies and that’s where the health part comes in. What we are choosing provides us those nutrients that are going to improve our health.
Nice. So, they’re based on our culture’s, first of all, so if we rely on some of our cultural foods, you know, those are healthiest for us, especially foods that are not processed. And then we want to have variety, we don’t want to keep eating the same thing day after day. What can I do for a healthy lifestyle, that’s a pretty fancy word there, what are
some basic things I can do for healthy lifestyle? Well, again it’s based on your habits, so you very much want to what you know make sure your not smoking, drinking taking or using drugs. You want to do things in moderation, be
as active as you can. Get regular checkups with your
doctor and just making sure all those
healthy changes are very gradual. Start each day with a healthy
breakfast. Breakfast is so important for us, it gets our metabolism going for the day.
So I shouldn’t jump into like a workout or a diet plan immediately. No, unless it’s
something that you know you kinda planned out and
thought about, usually people make changes more easily if if they’re
not trying to do too many things all at once. So focus
on those little small habits, you know, like eating, I’m gonna eat more
fruits and vegetables or I’m going to plan to take my lunch to work instead of eating
out. Those kind of things. Try new recipes at home, include new
ingredients, making sure your eating a variety of different types of foods again. Angie, why do people sometimes have a
hard time makings healthy choices. I think it’s
just people don’t know, their just use to what their, their habits, so there’s a lot of
foods that are available, they may not know what it is, how to cook it, what to do with it,
so then they will tend to shy away from it. The other thing is that it can be
really expensive, if you go into the grocery store, it looks
like the healthier foods, as opposed to a canned item if it has a lot of sugar, it can be a
little bit cheaper option. So they sometimes lean towards that because of the budget. So, Roxanne, what should I eat more of? Well, you should focus on the food guide pyramid. It teaches us to eat more
foods, you know, at the bottom of the pyramid
which was the grain group, we wanna make sure some
of those foods are whole grains, so that we’re getting more nutrients out of them. And then, of course fruits and vegetables.
People usually only get maybe two servings a day and you need more like eight to 10 servings. And you know it
doesn’t matter if they’re fresh, frozen or canned. All of those
choices are good for us. You know there’s a few things we
could do with some of those, like the can ones, we can drain out those liquids, but other than
that it’s just, you know, getting in those servings in different forms and you
know, especially with our families sometimes our kids are gonna like
fresh versus frozen, you know, so we have to kinda pay
attention to those kind of things as well. Then of course, we need our dairy foods, we can keep those low-fat. We need our beans, nuts and eggs, lean meats
like fish and poultry. And then of course
the beverages, we want to drink more water instead of sugary beverages. And considering that all those great
things you just mentioned the grains, the greens, the water, the nuts. Now, what are some foods that we should limit? Well of course, we want to watch out for those
sugary beverages, because they are empty calories, you know, they don’t fill us up, so we really want to
take those out of our diet as much as possible. We also want to watch those foods that
are high in fats, sugars and salt, because those
can cause disease if we eat those in excess. So those would include, of course,
package type foods, fast-food, chips, desserts, those kind of things. Nice, Angie, where can we find some help with making healthy eating choices? The University of Minnesota and the
Minnesota Chippewa tribes has the Simply Good Eating program, as its known here. And the Minnesota Chippewa tribes has the Lets Eat the Right Foods, where we sit down and we teach
basic nutrition and healthy choices and as we were saying with the foods you don’t know how to cook, we can do recipes, to show you how to cook them and even taste them, right there, because its interactive. So the class is going on, people are
learning to cook foods, eating and tasting, is it culturally
based as well or or can it be modified for
that? It absolutely can and that’s what we like to do and we have and I am Native American, so a lot of my curriculum is based
around our traditional foods. Sounds good, sounds really good, so were can I find a Simply Good Eating or a Let’s Eat Right
food class? We are absolutely everywhere. So if you go to any community
organizations, were also social service agencies, we partner with the counties, and schools, we offer and you can see if
your talking to your kids about what they did,
they will probably mention that they had a lesson and were there, so you can reach out to
the child’s teacher and get that information. And if you’re at Bois Forte, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, Leech Lake, Mille Lacs and White Earth reservations, you can call the Minnesota Chippewa
tribe at 1-888-903-8543 and then if you’re just in the
community can simply just ask for the Simply Good Eating program, and they will direct you to us. Okay, Roxanne, how do we create a budget for food? Well first of all, when were talking about budgeting, planning is is very key, because we have to know, what kind of foods we’re going to prepare
so that we can eat healthier, so that we will be able to use coupons, we will know what recipes we can use,
we can use some of the Simply Good Eating recipes, we can create shopping lists
ahead a time, so you don’t have to go to the grocery store as much. That kind of saves us on gas and things like that. And then, you know, trying to buy
things that are more local or in season are very important so
shopping and farmers market and, you know, looking to
see what is in the grocery stores that is, you know, from that season. So, you would be saving some money there and then maybe even growing your own food, you
know, having a garden or investing in a community
garden. You can be sharing similar duties with
other people Wow, That sounds very interesting. Angie, how can I get help buying meals? Well a couple different
programs, there’s the Food Stamps Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program. its just simply for everybody else called SNAP. Okay. And what that is it’s just food stamps and it’s just a fancy
name for it, and the money goes on the EBT
card, so that you can get, go grocery shopping, food shelves, you
can go to your local food shelf and they will and their choices are very nutritious.
And there’s free and reduced-cost school lunches and the WIC program for Women, Infants and
Children Nutrition Program. You can also call the Minnesota food
helpline to see if your eligible to apply and that number is 888-711-1151. Angie, what about accountability? Is there
anyway, can somebody come to the store with me, and with my stamps card, my SNAPS card, I’m in the store, is there any way
I can get some help and some direction, choosing the right foods and products that I should
consume. Absolutely, and one of the courses that we offer in the Simply Good Eating Program is we will actually go to the grocery store with you. Nice. We will make healthy choices of a
really nice lesson with comparing how much you have to shop for, what you can actually get the most money out of. Yes, tell me some more about this class, I
mean what the Simply Good Eating or Let’s Eat Right classes. So other than the
shopping, we do again, the taste testing, so new foods, we will bring in maybe it’s a recipe that you like, but will make a healthier version of it. Okay. And you can taste it make sure you’ll like it. We provide those recipes for you. We also just, one other things like to do is
demonstrate healthier traditional meals, so that way you can cook what you like
in a healthier way and then we just, you know, the
instructors that we have, like myself, know what it’s like to be a limited income. So we’ve been there, we’ve done it. You know, well be right there with you,
telling how to make those great decision That’s good. That’s very good. So, Roxanne, what are some simple ways to be physically active each day. Well, walking is one of
the best exercises that we can do and it’s for all ages and for all different levels of physical fitness. We can
all, you know, park our cars farther
away when we’re going places, so that we get a few extra steps into our day. You Can Dance, Dance around our house with our kids or incorporate some traditional type activities like powwow dancing,
within my culture, with what we do. You can also take the
stairs instead of elevators, enroll in physical activity classes or even sports, like you know, kids like to be
involved in, soccer, football, basketball.
Those kinds of sports. And then, we also got to stay very
active during the winter months, so, you know, we can go to the mall
and go walking instead of staying at home. We can do it
exercise videos in front of our TV. So, lots of ways to stay active.
Good idea. What are some resources Angie,
that can help my family stay physically active?
In the Simply Good Eating program we do promote physical activity. We can show you where you can find free
or low-cost physical activity in your neighborhood.
A lot of times it’s the YMCA and if your lower income, they do have some
sliding fee or some assistance that they can
help you with. And then you can just have a
conversation with other people that talk about the ways that you can get that into your
day. Nice. Nice. So Roxanne, what are some short term benefits to an active lifestyle? Well, our heart is gonna be healthier. Heart is muscle, so we need to work it with the physical activity, also going to increase our energy, make us be faster thinkers. It can help us burn some calories so
can help with some weight management. Also keeps our muscles,
bones and joints healthy and helps us deal with stress. That’s important. That’s really important. Angie what are some long-term benefits
to an active life? Obviously, a healthier life. Yes. Yes.
You lower your risk of obesity, and the reduced the risk of heart
disease and blood circulatory diseases and help reduce the risk for
high blood pressure and also type 2 diabetes which is very predominate in the native american
cultures. That’s very important to take a stance on that. And also, just to reduce your stress.
Yes. That’s very important. At least I think so. So Roxanne, how is healthy eating and active living
helping families and children? Well, first of all, if if we’re doing
that ourselves then we are acting as role models for our children and then as family if were
leading an active life styles were also, showing our communities that we should be. So, healthier communities, more vibrant families, yes, that’s
enjoyable. Yeah, keep everyone healthy, happy, better attitudes. Our kids, you know, see us eating healthy, so they
pick up those habits and then they practice them. That’s really good. Angie, can anyone participate in the
Simply Good Eating program? Our programs are targeted for lower-income families. If you want to see more information,
if you qualify, you can visit extension.umn.edu/nutrition or you can call the 612-625-7070. We are available in several different
languages, so if you need an interpreter, you can
just ask. They have quite a few different representation there. Also on the Bois Forte, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage Leech Lake, Mille Lacs and White Earth reservation, if you’re, and those nations, you can call
the Minnesota Chippewa tribe at 888-903-8543. That’s very important information to stay
culturally aware and not to so much take on the processed diet and food how how much of a struggle is this in the Native American community? And I know in the African-American
community, this is something that we struggle with because of the lack of variety of foods, and places to buy healthy foods. in certain neighborhoods.Does that
happen as well in the in the Native American community?
Absolutely. Your choices are different
if you actually live on the reservation as opposed to in the city. In the urban
areas we have a lot more choices, and there’s a lot more resources
available to us. Most the time on the reservation there
is only one store and that healthier choices do tend to be
higher-priced items. So again, that’s where the
planning comes into play, it’s not impossible you just have to be mindful. Yes, and then then we need to also
consider, trying to remember to pass on those
traditional meals, so that the diet for the particular
group is something that sustains us. I know for many ethnic groups in America, it is easy
for us to try to adapt to a burger and fry situation and not to knock a burger and fry,
but I believe most cultures here thrive on lots of vegetables and certain types of meat like bisons and and boar and not just a chicken and burger, and so how how important this is to try
to reiterate to the young people the message of, the cultural significance of eating? I think are native families struggle with the change in
diet you know that some of those foods, those traditional foods are not so readily available. You know a lot of the people only eat them during holidays, otherwise their really struggling to get
them back into their day-to-day food choices. Then you have to, you
know, try to pass those down to your children, which comes in, you know, the cooking skills are
important, in trying to teach kids while their young, how to cook. Nice. It’s
important. Well that’s what’s really important. I
believe that the eating is what builds families and and building families is what
builds nations, so I think it’s important for us to try
to remember this, this idea that we can circle around this
food and I’m not really sure if there are culturally
significant food items that come with stories
and things like that but I know in the african-american community through Kwanzaa we would celebrate
through particular food items and introduce a food item to our
young african-americans as that. Does that happen as well, is there something that’s significant, that they can pull the youth into eating through a
traditional message? Well, there’s two different things. We
do have a story about the Three Sisters, it’s the beans, the corn and the squash. Nice. And that the way that those plants work together, its a story on cooperation, and the three sisters having, they wanted
to be by themselves and they just decided that they’d grow better and they’d actually
flourish, I don’t know if you know much about gardens, but those three plants together are unstoppable. And that’s something that we teach to our kids and that’s a vegetable. We have T-shirts and it’s a very
important thing. And the other thing with our youth that I found really connects with them is when we talk about the historical trauma
and what’s happened to our people, with the boarding schools and how our
culture was trying to be wiped out. Yes. So when we go back to how our traditional foods were before that
period and really making a stance to say you had tried to assimillate us, but we’re not going to, and this is how we
use to live. Kids tend to want to be proud of who they are and
want to understand a little bit more about their history, so we can connect it
with food that way. I like that. Revolutionary eating. Absolutely. Trying to take a a turn to understand the past and still
strengthen yourself through very good nutrition and a great story,
which is you know, it gets that emotional, you know
composite in there. That’s very important to have that connection in
your culture and food. I understand from the
African-American community that we have many of a story in traditional
way and in the same with dealing with the struggle of the
country and how culture was wiped away, food is wiped
away, language is wiped away, and it is really powerful and significant that programs like this existed. You could
still kind of shake the ashes and and bring this thing
back up and I think it’s wonderful. Simply
Good Eating, extension.umn.edu/nutrition for more information call 612-625-7070. Let’s Eat the Right Foods, at 1-888-903-8543. And here are some of our key messages
that we want to make sure you leave with as a
ECHO wants to give you that good information about
eating healthy and being active is important for everyone. That’s our
first message, secondly you can make healthy food
choices even on a limited budget and third there are resources to help you buy and
prepare healthy foods. I would like to thank our guests for
joining us on ECHO. Thank you Angie Borneo from the
University of Minnesota Extension and Roxanne Johnson from the Indian
Health Service. We hope you enjoyed our show. If you
would like to see this information again or learn about other healthy, safe,
emergency, or civic topics, visit our website at
www.echominnesota.org. Remember ECHO provides information about health and safety to residents of Minnesota who
do not know English well. Our program airs monthly
at this station and we hope that you stay tuned to ECHO for more information. Thank you for joining us. ECHO TV is a co-production of Minnesota’s emergency, community and health outreach
collaborative of health, safety, emergency preparedness, ethnic and
non-profit agencies, and tpt’s Minnesota channel.